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Tuesday, June 29, 2004

"KEPT BACK" (16 of 20 LIMITED EDITION HAND-MADE BOOKS, APRIL 22, 2002) by DAVID LARSEN
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

I'm amused to put this in an "art collection" blog as this piece (well, like all Art) is really about what cannot be collected. It is a handmade book by Bay Area artist, poet, performer and scholar David Larsen. I'm *listing* it here because a slip of paper inserted within the book says this is one of only 20 copies to be signed and numbered by the artist.

Read The Chatelaine's Poetics (June 29, 2004) for more background on this work.

***
New Langton Arts, San Francisco; Direct from Artist



Monday, June 28, 2004

"WARPED WOMEN," (COLLAGE, MIXED-MEDIA PAINTING) by SUSAN BEE
Location: Red Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

[SECOND MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:

Susan Bee, along with Max Gimblett, Stephanie Syjuco and Santiago Bose, are artists with works in Galatea who are mentioned in this review of my book of art essays and poetry: MY ROMANCE. Here's the review in the current issue of MELUS, guest-edited by Rocio Davis. I'm particularly gratified by Thomas Fink's attention as he is a poet, painter and critic.

BOOK REVIEW:
Eileen Tabios, My Romance. Giraffe Books, 160 pages
by Thomas Fink

In My Romance, which juxtaposes poetry and visual art writings, Eileen Tabios carefully addresses political ramifications of art-making/reception and aesthetic issues. For example, she praises political painter Susan Bee for incorporating "sometimes dysfunctional fragments" of "a troubled world" in order to unify them "through color as well as the surface and gesture of her brushstrokes."

Form has political relevance in Tabios's poetics. The poem "Babaylan" speaks of "Filipina poets colonizing English." Seeking "to avoid narrative because it had facilitated the use of English to consolidate American colonialism in the Philippines"-- her native land -- as "the language for education, commerce, and politics," she favors "abstract" collagistic construction "to subvert meaning." A powerful erotic charge, tinged with surrealism, pervades many poems: "I am swooning into you with eyes of open stones." Poems like "The Color of a Scratch on Metal" and "Perhaps This Second Drift" abound with plural meanings, juxtaposing erotic adventure, aesthetic speculation, and awareness of power relations. Perspective is ever questioned: "Who is subject and who is observer?/ . . . . What if the observer is the controlling agent?"

Amid varieties of "romance," the poet/critic is "learning not to yearn for amnesia." Thus, she foregrounds postcolonial emphases on the relation of language, economics, eros, and "othering":

I do know English and therefore, when hungry, can ask for more
than minimum wage, pointing repeatedly at my mouth and yours.

Such a gesture can only mean what it means: I do not want to
remain hungry and I am looking at your mouth.

I do know English and still will not ask permission. ("I Do")


Of the artists discussed in My Romance, almost a third are Filipino, including noted young artists Stephanie Syjuco and Paul Pfeiffer. Tabios concisely elucidates the history of Spanish and U.S. colonization of the Philippines, post-Marcos corruption, and the Filipino diaspora, and this strengthens her interpretations of symbolic aspects of color. In Carlos Villa's work, gray "references how Filipinos are often faced with the impossible task of choosing between . . . the Philippines or the U.S." "The sanded sections, grids, and grid-ruptures activate the work's flat plane to offer the impression of a multi-layered space," "an active field" in which "spiritual" "presence" moves between "layers." Within the gray, "sanded sections generate a paler version of . . . indigenous Filipino brown," a tan signifying "evolution of-- and dilution of indigenous Filipino culture as a result of immigration, intermarriage, cultural amnesia and/or" globalization. In analyzing Santiago Bose's "Mondrian Squared," Tabios indicates how the artist "snares the Mondrian colors (the colors of the U.S. flag) into gray baskets representing the indigenous or non-colonized Filipino."

Tabios writes compellingly, as well, on artists who explore perception, spirituality, and psychology. In "Teacher," My Romance's cover painting, Max Gimblett, achieves a fissure-spanning "wholeness" when "the circle on the right panel of the diptych extends into the left panel so that it includes within its span the crack between the diptych's two panels" and imitates natural and psychic "fractures." "The circle allows for the break even as it doesn't break," and, by "crowd[ing] the edge of the canvas," it even points "beyond the edges of the painting" to incorporate "the world within the painting." She affirms "the juxtaposition of motion (the moving circle) and stillness (the 'Z' mark)" as "acceptance" of possibilities without the necessity of a reductive "choice." Indeed, My Romance's collaging of poetry, historical data, symbolic analysis of art, and formal evaluation itself embodies a critique of reductiveness and a championing of pluralism with a critical edge.

***
Prov.: A.I.R. Gallery, New York; Direct from Artist



Thursday, June 24, 2004

"ENDLESS LINE #11" (1998) (OIL ON CANVAS ON WOOD) by DARRELL NETTLES
Location: Hallway In Front of Kitchen, Pygmalion-First Floor

Darrell Nettles is one of the artists featured in the summer group show at O K Harris Gallery (New York). We've lived with our painting-sculpture from his "Endless Line" series for six years now and it remains vivid and alive. Darrell also makes fabulous drawings -- the images on this link are wondrously lyrical! One of Darrell's drawings is part of the summer show; here are venue details:

O K Harris Gallery
383 West Broadway (Spring - Broome)
212-431-3600
June days/hours: Tuesday - Saturday 10 - 6 pm
July days/hours: Tuesday - Friday 12 - 5 pm

***
Prov.: O.K. Harris, New York



Tuesday, June 22, 2004

"AMERICAN BLONDE" (1997) (ACRYLIC ON PANEL, 36 X 36 IN) by JAMES WESTWATER
Location: Master Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

"POMP" (1997) (ACRYLIC ON PANEL, 36 X 36 IN) by JAMES WESTWATER
Location: Master Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

"CAEDMON'S FIRST WORD" (1997) (ACRYLIC ON PANEL, 22 X 11 IN) by JAMES WESTWATER
Location: Master Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

"GRIFTER'S REWARD" (1997) (ACRYLIC ON PANEL, 11 X 11 IN) by JAMES WESTWATER
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"GARGLE" (1997) (ACRYLIC ON PANEL, 11 X 11 IN) by JAMES WESTWATER
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

THREE MATCHBOX PAINTINGS by JAMES WESTWATER
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

POSTCARD COLLAGE from JAMES WESTWATER
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

THIRD MENTION DUE TO UPDATE:

UPDATE:


James Westwater will be part of a new three-artist exhibition opening July 17, to coincide with SITE Santa Fe's Fifth International Biennial Exhibition. James also received a wonderful review of his "Pinklings" in the June issue of THE Magazine. Information on both as follows:

TRIKE: Carver Kong Westwater

July 17th to July 23rd, 2004

TRIKE presents the work of three artists currently transplanted in Santa Fe, and derived from the diverse geographies of Kansas, Hong Kong, and Brazil, with stops in London, Los Angeles, New York, and Rome. The exhibition establishes an experimental space for the determining of commonalities and disjunctions between varied approaches to art making. The artists are:

Jon Carver: Hypnagogic Figurator - intimate fragged narratives from memory and imagination.

Franky Kong: Conceptual Opportunist - populist interventions into conceived cultural realities

James Westwater: Displaced Modifier - branded impositions on bought and sold idealisms.

Each artist is challenging himself to create an individual piece that distills his ideas about the role of art and artist. Where these three pieces may or may not converge, provides a glimpse into the state of the contemporary art scene. TRIKE cycles around, but is not bound by, ideas of nomadic anomalism, territory, inclusion and exclusion, cultural velocities, freedom of movement, stoppages, detainment, transgression of boundaries, uncoded flows, and resonant signifiers.

Saturday, July 17th: TRIKE opening reception 5-7pm, and after-party 7-10pm (cash bar, food, live music, and DJ Ultraviolet)

PHIL SPACE, 1410 Second Street, Santa Fe, NM 87505, (505) 983-7945

Press Contact: Franky Kong, (505) 982-3663, frankyandjenni@aol.com

===========

THE Magazine, June 2004:

James Westwater: Pinklings


Expanding Love Lozenge come to rescue my people, grow your pinkling glow ‘til it lights in all directions, ‘til ‘tis a gentle force which covers all the land. James Westwater rises like a lighthouse above a sea of anemic conceptualists.

Westwater, stoppage harmonizer, non-logo brander of lost and surly idealisms, cerebral frequency modulater, former ironist, post-cynic, and now figurative powerhouse, packs a pretty pink punch with his latest batch of schizonated objects and pictures. Okay, let’s take it one at a time.

Stoppage Harmonization is the act of organizing stoppages, or blocking a flow of energy to produce intriguing effects; something like creating patterns with your paddle in the flow of running water. The current current is o’course commodity culture, busy decoding and recoding globally for mo’ of the money flow. While too many of us are backpaddling hard at this point, the shady Mr. Halliburtons are getting paid and getting laid. Westwater’s disruptions are rich in a whole other way. By wrasslin’ to the ground and branding his non-logo mark across appropriated paintings of bucolic farms and old ships at sail, Westwater effects a de-signifier’s strata schism, a shift, a one man iconoclasm, manufacturing a context, a ground from which to launch an infinite relapse, a looped vibration utilizing untapped art resonances in the energetic fields of woulda-been-discarded paintings and the aesthetic frequencies of Westwater’s custom modifications to show the schizophrenic lack in consumptive excess. That’s the cerebral part, the picto-linguistic feedback loop, the infinite invert of the advert, and the weird sounds it makes.

Westwater establishes an artistic terrain where fun and fleshy visuals happily marry idea-art rigor with neither having to make compromising sacrifices. Pinklings – little pink ticklings at our wasteful underbellies and corporate collusion. Why pink? Because as Westwater says, “Pink is the new orange.” Strangely enough the perverse new terrain he claims, the opening he creates and doesn’t fill (holey space), has in this new work gone beyond an ironic comment, beyond the cynicism of some of his earlier pieces. When Diogenes, ancient scorner of materialism and first cynic, was called before and subsequently insulted Alexander the Great, the conqueror legendarily said that if he hadn’t been born himself he would want to be Diogenes. Mainly because, like Westwater, the ancient court jester, the first flaneur, was having such serious fun.

The newest thing about this show was Westwater’s willingness to turn his displaced modifier upon himself, to ask what his own art might be missing, and to discover a powerful figurative undercurrent. Rumor has it he’s been reading a lot about Francis Bacon. Now you connect the dots. The authoritative Scratching and Clawing is the knockout, the flipping of the lighthouse switch, the appropriationist turning back to the body, defending the pink postures of the painter and in the end still lampooning the king.
-- Jon Carver

***
Prov.: Linda Durham Gallery, Galisteo, N.M.


Sunday, June 20, 2004

"TADASHI MURAKAMI'S SUPERFLAT MUSEUM -- LOS ANGELES EDITION" (2004) by TADASHI MURAKAMI AND A LONG LIST OF HELPERS
Location: Library, Pygmalion-First Floor

While visiting Los Angeles this weekend, I took the opportunity to visit Culver City which shows possibilities of becoming a Chelsea-type gallery district. Amongst others, I stopped by Blum and Poe to see the Takashi Murakami show, about which I'd previously heard much, from other artists as well as earlier media coverage.

Coverage is also provided by "blogging la" which specifically focuses on Murakami's supposed transition from artist to "businessman." I don't (yet) have a strong opinion on this judgment, except to say that when it comes to conceptual art, when a concept is a money-maker, why presumably diss that as more *commercial* than *aesthetic*?

Anyway, I got the ten-figurine set being pitched by Murakami (obviously factory-made etc.) because those teensie figures do the job in presenting Murakami's talent, as much as the other more expensive forms (sculpture, video, works on paper). I did find it gratifying that the work on paper behind the front desk proves that when it comes to the gestural, Murakami still has the goods when it comes to directly- or human-made work....

A great businessman? Indeed. But not withstanding those Louis Vuitton handbags, Murakami is also an effective conceptualist and brilliant colorist.

***
Prov.: Blum and Poe, Culver City



Saturday, June 19, 2004

"ENSO" (DRAWING ON FOUR PIECES OF HANDMADE PAPER) by MAX GIMBLETT
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"UNTITLED" (COLLABORATIVE DRAWING ON BUTCHER PAPER BETWEEN MAX GIMBLETT, E.T., T.P. AND NOMI) (2001)
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"[]" (2003) (PRINT, 15/25) by MAX GIMBLETT
Location: Yellow Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

"UNTITLED" (SUMI INK DRAWING AGAINST ASIA SOCIETY PROGRAMS) (2001) by MAX GIMBLETT
Location: Babaylan Lodge

POETRY/ART BROADSIDE by MAX GIMBLETT AND E.T.
Location: Babaylan Lodge

"DOUBLE HEADED CREATURE FEATURE" (ARTISTS' BOOK, 17.5 X 7 X 0.5 IN) by MAX GIMBLETT AND JOHN YAU WITH TOBY HINES
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

DRAWINGS IN TWO OF E.T.'S ART/POETRY JOURNALS by MAX GIMBLETT
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

DRAWINGS IN TWO COPIES OF MAX GIMBLETT MONOGRAPH by MAX GIMBLETT (2003)
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

EPHEMERA by MAX GIMBLETT
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

[SECOND MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

Among artists whose works have inspired my poems, I've spent the most time yet with Max Gimblett as we've also done collaborations (e.g. my "Poems Form/From The Six Directions" project). Not only is Max one of the featured artists in my book of art essays/poems MY ROMANCE, but it is Max's painting "Teacher" whose image is reproduced on the cover. To know Max's work is to experience the beauty of alchemy -- it's obvious by just touring the many wonders at his website.

UPDATE:
Max Gimblett opens two exhibitions this month:

The Auckland Art Gallery - Toi O Tamaki - opens today a major exhibition, "Max Gimblett: the brush of all things", painting, sculpture, and drawing 1977-2004, curated by Wystan Curnow, with catalogue essays by Thomas McEvilley and Wystan Curnow, and an interview with Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett on June 19th. This exhibition will travel to the City Gallery, Wellington, with an opening date of December 12th, 2004.

Gow Langsford Gallery opens "a very decided bright line", an exhibition of current work, on June 29, 2004.

In other news,for June-July 2004, Max is the artist in residence at the Elam School of Fine Arts, Auckland University in Auckland, New Zealand.


***
Prov.: Direct from Artist


Thursday, June 17, 2004

"COLD WATER FLAT" (2001) LIMITED EDITION ETCHING (23 OF 37) by ARCHIE RAND AND JOHN YAU
Location: Charles d'Amboise Wine Cellar

EPHEMERA (SKETCHES AND LETTERS) by ARCHIE RAND
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

"DOUBLE HEADED CREATURE FEATURE" (ARTISTS' BOOK, 17.5 X 7 X 0.5 IN) by MAX GIMBLETT AND JOHN YAU WITH TOBY HINES
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

"PICADILLY OR PARADISE" (SIGNED LIMITED EDITION OF 65, 12.5 X 9.5 IN, FERRIS EDITIONS) by TREVOR WINKFIELD AND JOHN YAU
Location: Library, Pygmalion-First Floor

[SECOND MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

The etching "Cold Water Flat" by Archie Rand and John Yau is part of a limited edition whose inception has an interesting history. The image is in their collaborative book 100 MORE JOKES FROM THE BOOK OF THE DEAD published by Meritage Press. As I was discussing its publication with John Yau, I suggested they may wish to consider running off an edition of this particular image as -- due to its theme -- it may be of interest to several oenophile-friends of mine. Archie Rand agreed, and, yes, I've since placed several in wine cellars across the country.

UPDATE:

Here is a press release about an exhibit featuring John Yau's collaborations with artists including Archie Rand:

VOLUME Gallery
530 West 24th Street (between 10th and 11th Avenue)
NY, NY 10011

Phone-212-989-8700
Fax-212-989-8708
info@volumegallery
www.volumegallery.com

John Yau + 3
Ilse Murdock, Archie Rand, Alison Taylor


June 21-July 13, 2004
Opening Reception: Friday, June 25

John Yau + 3 explores the nature of collaborations as it pairs poet, writer and critic John Yau with three artist collaborators: Ilse Murdock, Archie Rand, and Alison Taylor. Yau is no stranger to collaborations. In 1987, he and Rand began working together, and since then he has collaborated with an extensive and wide range of European and American artists. In all of these projects, it is the direct dialogue between text and image that Yau finds so appealing, “Can words and pictures meet and make something fresh?”

For longtime collaborators Yau and Rand, the process of collaborating has become fluid; sometimes a project is initiated by an image that Rand gives to Yau and sometimes Yau’s words come first. For Murdock, Taylor, and Yau, the collaborative process served as an introduction. Upon seeing their work, Yau responded with words which the artists then integrated into their images. The results are compelling pieces which richly illuminate the creative potential inherent in collaborations.

John Yau has published more than two dozen books, as well as essays for numerous museum catalogs and monographs. Since 1978, he has written for many American and European magazines (Artforum, Art in America, Art News, El Pais, Interview, Tema Celeste and Vogue) and has received abundant fellowships, honors, and awards. A project with James Brown will be published by Carpe Diem Press, and Movies As a Form of Reincarnation, a book with Archie Rand, is forthcoming from Granary Press.

For three decades Archie Rand has been considered one of America's foremost painters. Once a teenage prodigy, Rand has had over 80 solo and 200 group exhibitions and is represented in both national and international collections. He often writes for international art journals, and in 2002 Rand was given the Presidential Award for Outstanding Teaching at Columbia University where he is the Senior Professor of Visual Arts.

Ilse Murdock is a painter whose work explores the themes of eating and waste in contemporary culture. She received her BFA from Parsons School of Design and also studied at the New York Studio School. Last summer her cereal box collages were included in Feigen Contemporary’s 2003 exhibition “OnLine”.

Alison Taylor received her BFA from Art Center College of Design and is currently an MFA student in Columbia University’s Visual Arts Department. Her work has been shown at Baltimore’s American Museum of Visionary Art and at Los Angeles galleries like New Image Art, ACME and Track 16. Taylor’s paintings include a distinctive narrative quality that deconstructs many of the myths surrounding American society.

***
Prov.: Direct from Artists



Sunday, June 13, 2004

"EMIGRANT SAVINGS BANK/BALANCE: $0" (1998) (MIXED MEDIA ON PAPER, 9 x 7 IN) by DAVID SHAPIRO
Location: Yellow Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

[SECOND MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

I love this David Shapiro's drawing which collages an Emigrant Savings Bank ATM machine receipt denoting zero balance; on it, Shapiro draws (lyrical) evocations of eggsprouts (the inexpensive vegetable only heightening the theme of impoverishment).

Shapiro is not just a fabulous artist (I adored his tofu sculptures; which I suspect are in the same series as the eggsprouts drawings) but a filmmaker -- see this link about his and sister Laurie Gwen Shapiro's documentary on Tobias Schneebaum.

UPDATE:
David Shapiro's exhibit at eyewash@/Jack the Pelican received an appreciative review by Stephanie Cash in the current June/July issue of Art in America. Here's an excerpt from the review that was illustrated by a photo of one of Shapiro's installation which, at first glance, looked like the interior view of a grocery:

"David Shapiro's art is garbage -- specifically, two years worth of his own nonperishable trash...

"The cast-off containers were neatly categorized and displayed on low metal shelves, each aisle's contents denoted on overhead signs. Empty beverage containers that once held water, tea, juice, soda beer or other alcohols were most numerous. Flimsy cellophane bags for pita bread or chips were draped over metal rods. Other shelves held pizza boxes, fast-food containers, yogurt cups, egg cartons, cans for tuna and corn, packages for lightbulbs, empty deodorant dispensers, card-board tubes from folls of paper towels and toilet paper, an array of toothbrushes, depleted toothpaste tubes, over-the-counter medicines, dog-food bags, dirty sponges in their original wrappers and garbage bag boxes. Shapiro continued to add new remnants over the course of the show.

"In a 34-minute accompanying soundtack playing on speakers like retail Muzak, Shapiro ruminates on food and its attendant psychological associations. His product choices are explained in wandering tales of tangential memories and his own brand of neurotic cultural commentary. Shapiro informs us that he has to buy bottled water because the board of health told him that the tap water in his industrial neighborhood is unsafe, and that, when shopping with his grandmother as a child, he 'felt Jewish guilt and Irish shame and American nausea because this is the land of superabundance and people are still starving in India while I'm trying to decide between Frosted Flakes and Honey Nut Cheerios and I lose my appetite and get depressed but then I seek comfort in food....'"

"Shapiro's is the kind of show that is self-referential, but not to the point of narcissism. We become participants, in a sense, instead of captive voyeurs. We can scrutinize the artist's shopping choices and make assumptions about his personal habits, yet we can't escape taking a personal inventory of waht our own store might look like. Shapiro's show might make you question the choices you make next time you're at the store, or stop and think what it would be like to be confronted with two years' worth of your own garbage."

***
Prov.: LiebmanMagnan Gallery, New York



Friday, June 11, 2004

"RICE WINE" (2004) (DIGITAL PAINTING) by MELISSA NOLLEDO-CHRISTOFFELS
Location: Red Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

“Poetry! Three hundred years of losing our corn to the West and we celebrate a man and his two novels written in Europe. You cannot liberate a slave with a metaphor! So dance the zarzuela; I will take my rice in a mug; not in the harvest.”
--from "Rice Wine" (1961) by Wilfrido Nolledo


I was moved to receive this lovely digital painting, a gift from the artist Melissa Nolledo-Christoffels, because it was inspired by a short story "Rice Wine" by the artist's father and one of the leading lights of Filipino literature: Wilfrido Nolledo (click on this link to see a photo of the father-writer and artist-daughter.

You can see a reproduction of the digital painting here, where the award-winning story that inspired it is also reprinted in full; meanwhile, here's an excerpt:

The moon was out. The street shimmering below like a lake drifted evenly toward the mountains in the east while mad traffic droned into the dolorous hum of the beggars, kinsmen all, stretched in a column on the' sidewalk, banging their pails, sleeping resignedly on the cold cement, yelling at God. From a distance, in a yard, the smell of rice fermenting in earthen jars oozed from the depths of the earth. Earlier, the sun had aged it into essence and at the rising of the moon, the wind carried it, sweet, sourish, the dead aroma of beans-the wine of rice that the shriveled people on the sidewalk, drunk with its flavor, inhaled and swallowed greedily in their slumber.


***
Prov.: Direct from Artist



Wednesday, June 09, 2004

"AMERICAN BLONDE" (1997) (ACRYLIC ON PANEL, 36 X 36 IN) by JAMES WESTWATER
Location: Master Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

"POMP" (1997) (ACRYLIC ON PANEL, 36 X 36 IN) by JAMES WESTWATER
Location: Master Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

"CAEDMON'S FIRST WORD" (1997) (ACRYLIC ON PANEL, 22 X 11 IN) by JAMES WESTWATER
Location: Master Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

"GRIFTER'S REWARD" (1997) (ACRYLIC ON PANEL, 11 X 11 IN) by JAMES WESTWATER
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"GARGLE" (1997) (ACRYLIC ON PANEL, 11 X 11 IN) by JAMES WESTWATER
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

THREE MATCHBOX PAINTINGS by JAMES WESTWATER
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

POSTCARD COLLAGE from JAMES WESTWATER
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

SECOND MENTION DUE TO UPDATE:

UPDATE:
James Westwater received a wonderful review of his recent exhibition at Klaudia Marr Gallery in Santa Fe; the exhibit was entitled "Pinklings: new paintings and objects."

Here's an excerpt from the review written by Sara King and published in the June/July 2004 issue of Art in America:

"In these works the artist continues to use pop representation and abstract form to explore the relationship between nature and culture, the structure of psychological predicaments and questions of artistic authorship -- preoccupations that have played out in his works over the past twenty years. The artist's latest series, based on illustration of life-saving techniques from a Red Cross manual, takes a darker, more introspective turn and a different stylistic approach. Devoid of Westwater's familiar signifiers and rendered with vigorous brushwork, these large scale gestural works are both lyrical and ambiguous."

Congratulations, James!

***
Prov.: Linda Durham Gallery, Galisteo, N.M.



"DON'T TOUCH ME" (2003) (MIXED MEDIA, 9.5 x 1.1 x 2 IN) INSTALLATION by STELLA LAI
Location: Foyer, Pygmalion-First Floor

"FOUR SEASONS VACATION -2" (2003) (gouache on paper, 30 X 22 in) by STELLA LAI
Location: Yellow Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

"FOUR SEASONS VACATION -4" (2003) (gouache on paper, 30 X 22 in) by STELLA LAI
Location: Yellow Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

"PUCHAA MASK" (2002) (YARN, 13 x 9 x 8 IN) SCULPTURE by STELLA LAI
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"PUCHAA IN BOX" (MIXED MEDIA, 2001) SCULPTURE by STELLA LAI
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"PUCHAA'S SHORTCUT" (2002) (ROTATING MOTOR AND MIXED MEDIA, 9 x 4 x 4 IN) SCULPTURE by STELLA LAI
Location: Library, Pygmalion-First Floor

"UNTITLED" (PUCHAA DRUNK AMONG WINE BOTTLES)" (2003) DRAWING by STELLA LAI
Location: Library, Pygmalion-First Floor

"MTR SUPER HERO" (2003) (SILK SCREEN PRINT & HAND PAINTED PUSHPIN, #2/25) by STELLA LAI
Location: Turret Guest Bathroom, Pygmalion-First Floor

"[ ] PUCHAA AND CHECHE" DRAWING by STELLA LAI
Location: Library, Pygmalion-First Floor

EPHEMERA (DRAWINGS IN E.T.'S ART/POETRY JOURNAL, GALATEA GUEST BOOK, NLA AUCTION CHAPBOOK, & INVITATION AND INDIVIDUAL MASK MOLD FROM "DON'T TOUCH ME" INSTALLATION)
Location: Library, Pygmalion-First and Second Floors

[THIRD MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

Stella Lai was our discovery at the first San Francisco Art Fair we attended, where she also attracted the attention of many critics and curators...

UPDATE:
Stella is in a new exhibition in Florida! Here are details:

Worm-Hole Laboratory presents:

Gypsies Curse

Curated by José-Carlos Diaz

Opening reception
Thursday June 10th 2004 from 7 PM to 10pm

Artwork by Karen Azoulay, Rachel Foullon, Sally Heller, Aimee Jones, Stella Lai, Cristina Lei Rodriguez and Mary Elizabeth Yarbrough

Buena Vista Building
Miami Design District)
180 NE 39th Street, 2nd Floor
Miam, Florida.33137

Exhibition runs from June 10, 2004 through July 8, 2004
Open Saturdays 2–5pm or by appointment
For more information please call 305.798.6529

***
Prov.: Lizabeth Oliveria Gallery, Los Angeles; Direct from artist



Tuesday, June 08, 2004

TWO BOWLS AND PITCHER (the latter 1994) by PAULITA PACHECO
Location: Family Room, Pygmalion-First Floor

I love the birds on Paulita Pacheco's works. Pueblo affiliation is with Santa Domingo.

***
Prov.: [Native American] Museum, Santa Fe



Thursday, June 03, 2004

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TWO DRAWINGS IN E.T.'S ART/POETRY JOURNAL (2001) by G. SCOTT MACLEOD
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

[FIFTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

One of the highlights of my 2001 residency at the Helene Wurlitzer Foundation of New Mexico was meeting Montreal-based artist Scott MacLeod. It was great seeing him make these Taos-inspired paintings here. In my journal, he made drawings (one of them of a "Gotland Grave") related to his "Ancestral Homes" series; some images here (I was really pleased to hear later that his series were exhibited in 2002 at the Swedish American Museum Center in Chicago). I really love this series as it's narrative-laden while also working effectively as purely visual (even abstract) imagery. I also had a chance to listen to Scott sing -- an all around Renaissance Man.

UPDATE:
And now you also can hear Scott sing! Here's latest info:

A Brief Canadian History has three new down loadable songs.

http://www.abriefcanadianhistory.com/ordercd.html

You are welcome to down load the tunes and print out the liner notes below. We will eventually have downloadable liner notes on the website. I will keep you posted.

Enjoy the music pass it around naturally it my hope that this will generate gigs and interested so please pass it on.

All the best,
Scott MacLeod

6333 St-Laurent Boul
Montreal, Quebec
H4C 2S3
514.271.1468
www.abriefcanadianhistory.com

MacLeod 9, A Brief Canadian History

1. Dawson City Gold Rush 4:31
2. The Great Depression – Dirty Thirties 2:03
3. Les Patriotes 3:13

Why are we still searching for our identity?

A Brief Canadian History

I have created A Brief Canadian History because I like to tell stories with music and images. In my songs I have created vignettes about individuals, groups, and events that hold a significant yet often obscured place in our Native and Canadian history.

The title reflects our relatively brief period of European occupation and colonization in Canada. Being conscious of our history is an ongoing and necessary process, as the present and future, in turn, become history.

The performance and this music CD have been designed to promote the education of our history, both the concept of Canada and our relatively unknown Native heritage, and this has been done by conceptualizing a project that combines music, spoken word, theatre, and slide projections. The second aim of this performance is to promote tolerance, celebrate Canada’s multiculturalism and promote Canadian history as a topic of study.

My interest in history came from my grandfather Bert MacLeod who was a history teacher and promoter of Scottish and French culture through his heritage projects The Highland Village of Iona and Fortress Louisbourg in Cape Breton. The main impetus for taking this project on the road and to the schools was two-fold. First, as a traveling artist, I have come to realize just how little is generally known about Canada. The second, and final, main thrust was provided by an article published in the Montreal Gazette in 1999, it was titled “Fear of the original” by May Ebbitt Cutler, the former Tundra book publisher. This article stated that the arts in Canada have suffered due to fear of originality. I agreed with her, being an artist and musician myself I knew this first hand. May’s criticism was that our high art establishments have to a large extent, continued to promote mostly non-Canadian art. This has been done with our tax dollars, money that should be supporting our own talent. The result of this approach is that our museum curators, orchestras, theatre companies and publishers have overlooked our best artists and as a result many are never discovered or supported in Canada. In fact many of our artists have been pushed into exile and often appreciated elsewhere. A few that come to mind are; J.W. Morrice,Paul-Emile Borduas, Claude Vivier, Joni Mitchell, Neil Young and Leonard, all of whom, built their careers abroad or in the larger markets south of the border. Furthermore imagine all the Native artists that have never been seen or acknowledged. I know this is changing and things are improving here in Canada but we have a long way to go if we are to have artists that define a nation in its own eyes and in the eyes of the world.

I would like to thank my Canadian and Quebec inspirations, Leonard Cohen for putting my city in print and music, Richard Desjardins for opening my ears to Quebecois music, Francoise Sullivan for her multi-disciplinary approach to making art, Hugh MacLennan for defining the English/French dynamic in “Two Solitude’s,” Glenn Gould, for his trilogy, “The Idea of North,” “The Latecomers,” and “The Quiet in the Land,” Tom Thomson for painting the spirit of the north, Emily Carr for painting the beauty of the West, Greg Curnoe the artist for defiantly not leaving the north, Daniel Lanois for his unique sound and storytelling, The Tragically Hip for supporting the young Canadian bands of the north, and so many more. Please find out who they are.

In conclusion I give to you Canada, “A Brief Canadian History”, a show that one day will tour across Canada, let’s hope it helps to build interest and enthusiasm for Canada and all of its complexity. Lets hope it answers in full old questions and illuminated some new answers.

G. Scott MacLeod
Montreal, Quebec 2004

*These three songs are a sample from a much larger project.

DAWSON CITY GOLD RUSH

Gold was discovered in 1896 in the creeks of a native fishing camp at the junction of the Klondike and Yukon Rivers and this caused what was known as the Klondike Gold Rush. Termed the “Paris of the North” Dawson City was the largest city west of Winnipeg, 40,000 at its peak with telephone service, running water and steam heat. Elaborate hotels, theatres and dance halls were erected, and Scottish philanthropist Andrew Carnegie donated $25,000 for a public library in 1903. The town was staked out by Joe Ladue and named after George M. Dawson, Director of the Geological Survey of Canada, who explored the region in 1887. In 1899 the Gold Rush was over and 8000 people left Dawson that summer. By 1902 the city only numbered 5000 and Dawson officially became an incorporated city.

1898
The real gold of the Klondike
Was in entertainment
Because the stakes were already claimed

So bring your pans and horses
And set up your miner’s tents
There is no gold for you in Dawson
Just money to be spent

CHORUS

‘Cause even an angel
Couldn’t be good in Dawson
Midnight sun on the Yukon
Got ‘em through the crossing
Montreal Marie
Snake Hips Lilly
And Klondike Kate
Would help pass a lonely miner’s day

1899
The stampede for gold is over
And 8000 leave
But a town is born

So bring your pans and horses
And set up your miner’s tents
There is no gold for you in Dawson
Just money to be spent

CHORUS


THE GREAT DEPRESSION
The Dirty Thirties
.

Few countries were affected as severely as Canada during the Great Depression of the 1930s. One in five Canadians became dependent on the government for relief. Unemployment never declined below 12%. The Depression’s severity was due to a poor welfare structure and misguided government policy. Saskatchewan was plagued by crop failures and the lowest price for wheat in recorded history. Farmers, young people, small businessmen and the unemployed bore the burden of economic hardship. Conservative R.B. Bennet and W.L. Mackenzie King refused to provide work for the jobless insisting that the provinces should provide care. The depression spawned political reform movements such as the democratic socialism of J.S. Woodsworth and T.C. Douglas.


The dirty 30’ were the great depression years
We road the rails in search of work
Our destinies unclear
Arrested for vagrancy with no clemency

CHORUS
Union folk come along
And sing those union songs
Unions be strong
Our time is not long

Dust and debt destroy our prairie long
And do nothing politicians carry on
While we can’t make our loans
And the banks foreclose

CHORUS

R.B. Bennet is afraid of Western Socialists
Woodsworth and Douglas are no communists
Communist, Socialist who cares
All we want are jobs and health care

CHORUS


LES PATRIOTES

The name given after 1826 to the Parti Canadien and to the popular movement that contributed to the REBELLIONS OF 1837-38 in Lower Canada. The primary francophone party, led mainly by members of the liberal professions and small-scale merchants, was widely supported by farmers, day-labourers and craftsman. Its more distinguished leaders included Louis-Joseph PAPINEAU, Jean-Oliver Chenier and Wolfred Nelson. The torching of Patriotes’ homes, imprisonments, exiles, trials and hangings followed the Rebellions of 1837-38. The failure of the rebellions led to the disappearance of the Parti patriote. Some former leaders, however,returned to active politics in the united PROVINCE OF CANADA.

Fernande Roy Canadiain Encyclopedia

Cent quarante prisonniers
Sont déportés
1839
Les Patriotes en exile

C’est un temp de colere
Sur un bateau de prisonniers
Je pense à mes camarades morts
Par les fusils anglais

Et nous sommes deux peuples
Sans pays
Et si tu vois mon pays
Mon pays malheureux

Cent quarante prisonniers
Sont déportés
1839
Les Patriotes en exile

Et nous sommes deux peuples
Sans pays
Et si tu vois mon pays
Mon pays malheureux X3

MUSICIANS
Scott MacLeod: Vocals, acoustic and electric guitar, harmonica
Jonathan Moorman: Fiddle, bouzouki
Jamie Hebert: Bass
Kat Brown: Vocals
Christina Sciascia: Vocals

Produced by Scott MacLeod
Recorded, mixed and mastered by Jamie Hébert
Recorded at Regent Ave. Studio, Montreal, Quebec, Canada 2003 & 2004.

Thank you:
Quebec Team: Pierre Ross, Walter Makowski, Nancy Stokes, Carl McQuaid,Dave Chisholm, Joe DiLeo, Paul Hebert, Ros Wyse, Marc Jalbert, Lorrain Tibbets, Christine Long, Genevieve Kathleen Waller, Pauline Naidoo,Jacques Garcia, Heather Markgraf-Lowe, Sylvia Kocman, Huntley Addie,Delores LaPratt, Natasha Pedros, Angele Dostie, Mike Burns, Dave Hickey,Bevan Skerratt, John Dodge, Stef Mercier, Kingsley Gordon, Becky Fletcher, Murray Elliott, Norma Nixon, Quebec Provincial Teacher’s Association, Hurley’s Irish Pub, Dollard Centre for the Arts, the kids of Northview Elementary School, St-Anthony’s Elementary, John Rennie High School, Riverdale High School, Armand Corbeil, La Salle Catholic High School, and Hudson High School.

Ontario Team: The Honorable Laurier L. LaPierre, O.C., Les Seaforth,Michael Tait, The Harbourfront Centre, and Jo Ann Lane,

Vancouver team: Chief Bill Williams, Mel and Aaron Nelson-Moodie, of the Squamish Nation, Drew Leitham, Shell Neufeld from the Witness Organization, Marian Gilmour from Heritage Hall, The McGraw family,Daniel J. Collins of Propaganda Foto Studio.

And finally to all those who have attended our performances and bought our CD’s and t-shirts.

Fi-rinne productions 2004
All songs © SOCAN 2004
For more information or donations go to www.abriefcanadianhistory.com
abriefcanadianhistory@hotmail.com

***
Prov.: Direct from Artist



"[] (KETCHUP)" 1978) (SIGNED PRINT) by RALPH GOINGS
Location: Galatea Offsite-San Francisco Office

"[] (KENTUCKY FRIED CHICKEN)" 1978) (SIGNED PRINT) by RALPH GOINGS
Location: Galatea Offsite-San Francisco Office

I suspect that no one paints glass and through glass better than Ralph Goings.

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Prov.: O.K. Harris, New York



"[] (SIX WATERCOLORS)" by DALE WITTIG
Location: Galatea Offsite-San Francisco Apartment

Proving how the price of the object has no relationship to aesthetic value, Dale Wittig's work -- which we acquired through one of Printed Matter's "Cheap Art" sales has been a pleasure to live with for years now. (Click also on the Artnet link to see one of Claes Oldenburg's pretzels, also in Galatea's collection.)

***
Prov.: Printed Matter, New York



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