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Sunday, July 25, 2004

BREAD (UNTITLED)" (2003) (WOOD & STRING, 3.5 x 10.5 x 5 IN) SCULPTURE by ULRIKE PALMBACH
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

and

"UNTITLED" (2003) (MIXED MEDIA) by KATHRYN SPENCE
Location: Library, Pygmalion-First Floor

[SECOND MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

Ulrike Palmbach's sculptures never fail to move me -- it's why she's one of 18 artists featured in my book of art essays and poems MY ROMANCE.

I've admired Kathryn Spence's work since seeing one of her enchantingly-lumbering creatures. I adore ours, two sweet little mud critters in a box. Mud babies -- I coo over them everytime I look into their box.

UPDATE:

Ulrike Palmbach and Kathryn Spence are among the artists who will exhibit at

WHAT'S DOIN'
A Group Show
July 31-August 31, 2004
Stephen Wirtz Gallery
49 Geary Street
San Francisco, CA 94108
www.wirtzgallery.com


Reception for the Artists: Saturday, July 31, 2-5 p.m.
Bar and Jazz Piano

***
Prov. (Ulrike Palmbach): Stephen Wirtz Gallery, San Francisco

Prov. (Kathryn Spence): New Langton Arts 2003 Benefit Fundraiser (don. by artist and Stephen Wirtz Gallery, San Francisco)



Tuesday, July 20, 2004

"MAN IN THE BOX" AKA "THE PATRIOT ACTS" (2004)  (LIMITED EDITION PRINT) by "MILAGROS MCCOY" AKA MELBA ABELA
Location: Babaylan Lodge
 
I met Melba Abela in June when I did a poetry reading during the opening of her art exhibition with Terry Acebo Davis at the Asian Art Museum.  This is one of her "political works" from her "other personality -- Milagros McCoy who occasionally writes or matches word and image texts for publication."  Thanks Melba!
 
***
Prov.: Direct From Artist
 
 


Monday, July 19, 2004

"[] (HAND, MAPPED OUT, PAINTED/DRAWN AGAINST HAND-MADE PAPER) by SANTIAGO BOSE
Location: Babaylan Lodge
 
[FOURTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]
 
UPDATE:
A moving letter from Santi Bose's daughter, Lilledeshan, which also points to a new site on Santi's work:
 
http://www.juantamad.com/santiagobose/index.php
Santiago Bose Tribute
Sunday, 3 pm, July 25
921 Poinsettia St, Santa Ana, 92701.
 
My dad would've been 55 on July 25, 2004. After his death he had a major retrospective at the Cultural Center of the Philippines. He also got the Gawad CCP award. A book (scroll down to July 5 post) will be launched about him in Manila on his birthday. It makes me sad that my sister and I are a continent away while my family is celebrating his life and art, so for his birthday, I am putting together a small tribute, a commemoration: at 921 Poinsettia St, Santa Ana, 92701.
 
We will have
1. An altar
2. A talk on Santiago Bose's life and work (by me and Diwata, probably)
3. Slideshow of his work and video show of his installations
4. Q&A
5. Prayer
6. Eating! (chips and dip and maybe other Filipino food)
 
This will be on Sunday, 3pm, July 25.
Email me for details or directions.If you live in SoCal, please go--but if you're going, PLEASE r.s.v.p. other wise we might not have enough food.
 
ABOUT SANTIAGO BOSE: (stolen from the BWF website)WORKS ONLINE: http://www.juantamad.com/santiagobose/index.php
 
Baguio City-born Santiago Bose, passed away on December 3, 2002. As one of the most significant contemporary artists of the Philippines,Bose also earned his reputation as a grass roots activist, educator,community organizer, and scholar. Bose has long been credited as a forerunner in his use of local materials. From his early art making years in the 1970s and 1980s, the artist's work would often include indigenous media, ranging from bamboo and volcanic ash, to the castoffs and debris of an over-industrialized nation (found objects,bottles, "trash"). Bose consistently and unapologetically addressed difficult social and political concerns, specifically of thePhilippines--and although he approached his subject(s) with deep criticality and gravity, it was never without a sense of humor and wit, however irreverent.
 
p.s. [insert shameless self-promotion here] My band is also doing a show at Long Beach the night before; http://thevelvetash.com.
 
***
Prov: Direct from Artist
 

Sunday, July 18, 2004

"[] (MANOSCRITTI)" (2003) by DAVID C. SCHER (167/500 SIGNED EDITION HAND SILK-SCREENED BY KAY ROCK MANUAL SCREEN PRINTING)
Location: Library, Pygmalion - Second Floor

I love this copy of Pierogi Press #10 (http://www.pierogi2000.com/pierogi_press/covers.html) out of Brooklyn. I was sent this copy of this literary/arts journal because it includes the title poem from Barry Schwabsky's OPERA which I published through Meritage Press (for more information, see http://meritagepress.com/opera.htm). According to Susan Swenson, Pierogi's editor and publisher, the journal is usually produced in limited, numbered editions (usually 500 copies). But what's nifty is how the cover of each issue presents the work of a different a different artist "which is hand silk-screened and signed."

So this issue presents the delightful work of David C. Scher -- certainly frame-worthy if one chose to disassemble it from the rest of the journal. But I'm keeping it as is because I love the subversive nature of the actual art work (vs a reproduction of it) being a publication's cover: it tweaks the notion of visual art being untouchable!

Prov.:
Pierogi, Brooklyn, N.Y.


Thursday, July 08, 2004

"AGENTS" (1996) (INK, GRAPHITE AND GEL MEDIUM ON CLEAR MYLAR, 17 x 11 IN) by SHARON LOUDEN
Location: Dining Room, Pygmalion-First Floor

"AGENTS" (1996) (INK, GRAPHITE AND GEL MEDIUM ON CLEAR MYLAR, 17 x 11 IN) by SHARON LOUDEN
Location: Dining Room, Pygmalion-First Floor

[SECOND MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:
Ah -- I love artists (or anyone) who thinks out of the box. Kudos to Sharon Louden for this, as reported by Artnet.com:

ARTIST SELLS SHARES TO FUND WORK

Faced with a depressed economy and a shortage of grant funding, New York artist Sharon Louden decided to raise the $20,000 she needed for a large new art project by “securitizing” it herself, drawing up a prospectus and selling shares in the work to investors. The scheme tapped into what one of her fans referred to as the “psychic pleasure” of supporting young artists as well as a more bottom-line-oriented interest in the notion of art as investment, according to a recent story in the Washington Post. Loudon found nine investors, who kicked in between $200 and several thousand dollars to underwrite a 6,000-square-foot work for the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art in Kansas City.

The Attenders, as the installation is called, uses some 850 miles of black and gray monofilament fishing line, assembled into myriad hanging bundles that are dispersed through the space; the artist considers them “emotional extensions of herself” that are meant to be touched and encountered by observers as part of an interactive experience. After the museum exhibition, Loudon sold the work to the Progressive Corporation, which is a major corporate art collector, for the lobby of the company’s new call center in Phoenix. The deal earned returns for the investors of between 50 and 75 percent, Loudon said -- and some of the investors asked her to plow the profits into her new venture, an animation project. An exhibition of Louden’s work goes on view this September at Anthony Grant, Inc., on 57th Street in Manhattan.

***
Prov.: Haines Gallery, San Francisco



Wednesday, July 07, 2004

"OPEN CAREFULLY" (2000) (PLASTIC, PRINTED PAPERS, PAINTED STONES, INK AND SCOTCH TAPE, 9.25 x 5.5 x 2 IN, 177/1,000 AND 374/1,000) by RICHARD TUTTLE
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

"SPHERICITY" (1993) (DRAWING FOR BOOK OF SAME NAME WITH MEI-MEI BERSSENBRUGGE, KELSEY STREET PRESS, 23/50) by RICHARD TUTTLE
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

"FOUR YEAR OLD GIRL" (1998) (PRINT FOR BOOK OF SAME NAME WITH MEI-MEI BERSSENBRUGGE, KELSEY STREET PRESS, 13/60) by RICHARD TUTTLE
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

[SECOND MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

I enjoy living with the prints of Richard Tuttle presented in collaboration with the wonderful poet Mei-mei Berssenbrugge.

I also enjoy the artist multiples I acquired during Richard's 2002 exhibition, "Two With Any To" at Sperone Westwater. Here's a description of the multiple from the gallery's press release at the time of the exhibit:

Designed, assembled and painted by the artist, this object blurs the boundary between the book, the catalogue and the multiple. It consists of a hand painted plastic container which is suggestive of a clam shell shape. There are two compartments within this oval: one holds five painted stones; the other contains a small booklet of ten thumbnail images of recent sculptures.s "Open Carefully" is completed by a fan made out of five printed paper strands, that connect the booklet to the outside of the container. Notions of inside, outside, top, bottom, front, and back are all confounded in this mysterious object.

and

"WARPED WOMEN," (COLLAGE, MIXED-MEDIA PAINTING) by SUSAN BEE
Location: Red Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

[THIRD MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:
Susan Bee and Richard Tuttle are paired together in a group exhibition entitled "Mixed Company: Women Choose Men" -- through to July 17,2004 at A.I.R. Gallery, 511 W. 25th St., #301, New York, N.Y. (Tues.-Sat., 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.).

***
Prov.: Sperone Westwater, New York; Kelsey Street Press, Berkeley, CA; A.I.R. Gallery, New York



Monday, July 05, 2004

"[] (HAND, MAPPED OUT, PAINTED/DRAWN AGAINST HAND-MADE PAPER) by SANTIAGO BOSE
Location: Babaylan Lodge

[THIRD MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

This work was a gift from Santiago Bose. Nothing I can say would ever capture how meaningful this artist is to me, as reflected partly in a poem I wrote for him:

Footnote 69 to The History of Fallen Angels
--for Santiago "Santi" Bose

Why must every word define
heartbreak? Word after

word after. The blind
watchdog’s eyes are red

under the noonday sun--
so what? A blind dog’s

eyes lit into “luminous red.”
So what? You are turning

my wine into vinegar fit
only for burning acid

into a god’s fresh wound.
Why are we sponging

vinegar into a wound?
Why is a blind dog

the one who keeps watch?
Why use words for Poetry?

There must be a necessity
to my wreaking poems

over men parachuting into burning
seas when the scene is only

a photograph tacked near Virgin
Mary within a freezing stone grotto

that plummeted into darkness
after you startled me into whirling

my skirt into a wind that blew out
all the flickering votive candles.

UPDATE:
To be launched this month in Manila will be a major overview of the legacy of Philippine artist Santiago "Santi" Bose. Edited by one of the Philippines' leading poets Alfred "Krip" Yuson, the book is entitled ESPIRITU SANTI: The Strange Life and even Stranger Legacy of Santiago Bose (WATER DRAGON, Inc., 2004). Krip was kind enough to share its useful Table of Contents -- useful for showing Santi's "strange" legacy. But it's a strangeness that befits the wide-ranging, varied effect of Santi's art as well as persona, in turn befitting the vicissitudes of this artist's life. The book includes two of my essays on Santi (whose influence, by the way, helped inspire my book My Romance) as well as seven poems, including the above. Following the Table of Contents is Krip's esssay as Editor: "Afterword/Afterward":

Table of Contents

Part 1 - Bye Bye, Bad Boy...

A Letter to Friends by Krip Yuson / 6
Obituary / 7
Bye, Bad Boy by Chit Balmaceda Guttierrez / 7
And from the World Wide Web… / 8
Santi in the Other World by Frank Cimatu / 10
Dragonfly by Desiree Caluza / 11
A Beautiful Mind by Karlo Altomonte / 11
Elegy, sort of by Conrado de Quiros / 12
Santo Santi, Viva Bose! by Ruben Defeo / 12
Santi shantih Santi by Alfred A. Yuson / 14
Et Espiritu ni Santi by Boy Yuchengco / 20
Singular Artist by John L. Silva / 22
A Fool for Art by Luis Francia / 23
Santi’s Last Mambo by Elizabeth Lolarga / 24
Eulogy by Alan Rivera / 26
Santiago Bose: Behind the Emptied Page by Eileen Tabios / 28
Santiago Bose 1949 – 2002 by John Batten / 32
Portrait of an Artist as Father by Lilledeshan Bose / 35

Part 2 - Nomad In No Man’s Land
Childhood Roots of a Baguio Artist by Jonathan Best / 40
Excerpts from An Interview with Santi Bose by Jonathan Best / 42
Santiago Bose: Magic, Humour and Cultural Resistance by Pat Hoffie / 57
Excerpt from Renewing Historical Memory by Alice Guillermo / 60
Cultural Conflicts: Santiago Bose by John Batten / 66
A Shaman Hits the Island: Lower East Side Report by Jimmy Durham / 68
Santiago Bose: How the Filipino Becomes a Nomad by Eileen Tabios / 70
Journals of a Cultural Drifter by Jeannie Javelosa / 76

C O L O R F O L I O / 79

Part 3 - In Search of the Exiled Bulul
Walls and Landscapes by A.S. Consignado / 88
An End to Detail by Peggy A. Bose / 89
Allusions of Space Revelry by Sammy Cudal Sta. Maria / 91
Bose’s Baguio Connection by Amadis Ma. Guerrero / 92
Extraordinary Mural by Amadis Ma. Guerrero / 92
Excerpts from Santiago Bose: Filipino Artist by Jonathan Best / 94
Bose’s ‘Tribal Memorabilia’ by Leonidas V. Benesa / 96
Excerpt from Bose’s Identity Game by Leonidas V. Benesa / 97
Excerpts from Santiago Bose: Brave in Art’s Wilds by Pet G. Cleto / 98
Excerpts from Bose’s Levels by Marian Pastor / 99
An Exuberant Banquet of Images from Bose / 100
Excerpt from Grim Tales from a Brother Grim by Alfrredo Navarro Salanga /
101
Peregrination on Paper: A Review of Santi Bose’s ‘Archives of a Lost
Revolution’ by Alfrredo Navarro Salanga / 101
Excerpt from Introduction to the Philippines Participation: 4th ASEAN
Exhibition of Paintings and Photography by R. Paras-Perez / 102
Art by Necessity by Jose Esteban Arcellana / 103
Artists as Builders of a City by Andrew D. Magsambol / 104
Excerpts from Santiago Bose: Teller of Theoretical Dramas by Rachel
Patanne- Mayo / 105
Santiago Bose by Julie Ewington / 106
Artist With a Taste for Rebellion by Martin Stevenson / 107
Excerpt from At Home and Abroad: 20 Contemporary Filipino Artists by
Patrick D. Flores / 109
‘Bad Boy’ Santi Bose by Carlomar A. Daoana / 110

Part 4 - In His Own Write
Baguio Graffiti / 114
A Savage Look at Indigenous Art: Notes in Transit / 118
Decentering from Indifference: Fragmented Notes on NYC and Baguio City /
120
Bootstrap Art / 124
Confessions of a Talisman: Philippine Amulet Drawings / 125
Eyes of Gauze, or Why Art Matters / 126
The Return of Abaka Man / 128
Speaking in Tongues: A Conversation with Frida Kahlo /130
Imagined Borders /132
Duality of Worlds /133
The Exiled Bulul / 134
Excerpt from a Concept-Proposal: Converting Baguio Botanical Garden into
an Art Park / 137
Excerpt from a Concept-Proposal: Project Freedom Island /138
A Letter to Friends /140
Ethnic Foragings: Through Sagada and the Big Apple and Back /144
Reinventing the ‘Pandesal’ Mentality /146
Letter of Resignation /148

Part 5 - Santi Lives!
Sanctus Sanctus Santi by Pandy Aviado / 152
Whatever You Are, Wherever You Are Now by Sylvia L. Mayuga / 152
Bose and the Forbidden Fire by Rachel Patanne-Mayo / 153
Artist Santi Bose’s home in Sagada's morning mist by Desiree Caluza / 153
Excerpts from Santiago Bose: His Works and Words by Alice G. Guillermo /154
A Personal Sketch by Peggy A. Bose and Lilledeshan Bose /160
Curriculum Vitae / 164
Excerpts from The Last Interview with Santiago Bose by Howie Severino /166

POETRY
State of Mind by Victor Peñaranda/170
Eyes of Gauze by Alfred A. Yuson / 170
Jaguar by Eduardo Geronia, Jr. / 170
Footnotes by Eileen Tabios /171
Brown Man’s Burden by Barbara Jane P Reyes /172
Now Showing by Barbara Jane P. Reyes /173
Santi Astroscope by Rick Dangerous / 174

Guide to Visuals / 176
Staff Box and Contributors / 178
Afterword / Afterwards / 180

-----

A F T E R W O R D / A F T E R W A R D S
by Krip Yuson

Rummaging for forgotten valuables recently, in fact a few days before this book went to press, I found an odd item in a drawer among all sorts of papers on stock options, futures, and preferential bonds. You better believe it. It was a receipt for a courier delivery of something from Santiago Bose of 37 Cut-Off Road, Quezon Hill, Baguio City.

Can’t remember, for the life of me, what it had been. Very possibly, it was some artwork for use in Caracoa, the poetry journal I occasionally edited, in the ’80s.

Santi was always generous, to friends, strangers and foes alike. With friends, he was a soft touch. He’d give up artworks, or lend them readily, at a word. For strangers, he had utterly philantrophic pick-up lines. And for perceived rivals for attention, or those whom he imagined had crossed him, he had the grossest max-out putdowns, jokes, even stand-up skits conducted ex tempore, his punchlines preceded by his trademark serial guffaws.

Such generosity of nature must not go unrewarded. Hence this book, which is foremost a labor of love by many of us who found him super-kulit. It is also a well-deserved testament to the life he led, one of full creativity and unmitigated joy, of gregarious gossip-mongering and totalitarian tampo.

We hope it goes a long way in memorializing what Santi was all about, which was many things, all and sundry, all beneficence of spirit and mischief.

Random is as random goes. As Santi propelled himself from the muscular iconographer and eventual iconoclast that he was, to cardiovascular concerns we all shared in, so did we attempt to gather what we could of a life of art that knew no bounds.

This is not meant to be a scholarly treatise on, or anything approaching full documentation of, Santi’s life and legacy. We do not even propose that his demise was untimely. Most likely, he willed it to happen when it did, to make a caustic point, or to force us to work -- and play -- with the grand assortment of collage pieces and untied ribbons he had strewn all along the way.

In his own impressive, uniquely ironic way, Santi as rugged individualist personified community and the sense of the communal spirit at work, and play. He lived for others. He was a sportive macho for other ladies. He was Fun Man, funnyman, zany, hyper, weird, an irrepressible comedian for whom art, life, death, causes, family and friends were all grist for the highly inventive mill of his commentary and parody.

The irreverence was as much for show as it was intended to remind himself, methinks, that he owed the universe no favors but the picayune and picaresque. He had a lover’s quarantine with the galaxy, it might be said. The way he would say it, as when he’d quip how he seemed to be off on his biodata when he meant biorhythm. The malaprop became another weapon of choice for him, he who was always clad in buttery armor because of all the built-in chinks, and with both heels Achillean, in his kind of fated heroism.

Random straggler and nomad he was. So too do we randomly collect obra maestra after obra maestra, as well the memorabilia he has left us, as gifts of the one magus who dared to be benevolently insane with his high-spirited talents and genius.

The reader may wonder about the lack of standard orthography and/or style in the munificent text found in this volume. I say: as with Santi, what you see is what you get. What we saw, at first blush, is mostly what we retained. Thus, there is Tingguian and various other spellings of the term. There is bulol and there is bulul, as Santi himself titled one of his written pieces. Personally I would favor the former, but only because that’s how I first read it. Bul-ol might be closer to the right true path of the indigene, if not the ingenue.

But then there is Santy and there is Santi. That’s progress for you. That’s development, maturation, an antidote to stasis. Santiago Bose never stayed at rest. He doesn’t, still.

You will find repeat text in this volume. What he said or wrote -- for Santi was an indefatigable writer, too -- and what was written of him was often quoted and re-quoted. We have kept the repeats purposefully in place. We have also kept Commonwealth writing as it is, with its British spelling. We have kept variances in names, such as Jimmy Durham and Jimmie Durham, as how the earlier Santy or the latter Santi wrote his friend’s name down.

We have tried to attribute sources as best we could, give credit where credit is due. But we need cash. And that’s another word for fast-tracking and cheating time, of its own silly tricks.

We give you ESPIRITU SANTI: The Strange Life and Even Stranger Legacy of Santiago Bose, as a tribute to our friend. We don’t have to understand him. We only have to have the usual cosmic fun with Santi Bose -- the clown, bad boy, lover, organizer, drag-down tangler, misfit, miscreant, maestro, virtuoso, and deeply major influence on Philippine and international art, as much as on our own way of thinking and living.

Viva Santi! He hasn’t left the building. Bose lives on.

***
Prov.: Direct from Artist



Saturday, July 03, 2004

"RICE WINE" (2004) (DIGITAL PAINTING) by MELISSA NOLLEDO-CHRISTOFFELS
Location: Red Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

(SECOND MENTION DUE TO UPDATE)

This lovely digital painting, a gift from the artist Melissa Nolledo-Christoffels, was inspired by a short story "Rice Wine" by the artist's father and one of the leading lights of Filipino literature: Wilfrido Nolledo.

You can see a reproduction of the digital painting at this link, where the award-winning story that inspired it is also reprinted in full.

UPDATE:
Melissa Nolledo-Christoffels sends a note on her "FIRST EXHIBIT"!!! Congratulations, Melissa!

Hi folks--

Just wanted to share the news that I'll be participating in (my first) group exhibit this coming September 17 at the Arts and Books Gallery in Los Angeles. You can view some of my other work at (although those on this link will not be part of the exhibit): http://framedperspective.com/artwork.htm If you have friends in Los Angeles, please pass this invitation on to them!

Melissa

Arts & Books Gallery
4166 Santa Monica Blvd
Los Angeles CA 90029
323 645 2435


Banggaan (Art Collisions in the Internet)
Digital Art and Photography
September 17 - October 16, 2004


The Arts and Books Gallery proudly presents "Banggaan" a Tagalog word which means "collision." "Banggaan" is a group show by 15 artists and photographers who have been interacting worldwide via the internet with digital art and photography for the past five years. the artists and photographers represented with their respective country of location are: Lynda Reyes, Vics Magsaysay, Lucio Martinez, Rodolfo Samonte, Ed Labadia, Mel Veracruz and Melissa Nolledo-Christoffels, (U.S.A.); Edd Aragon, Alfredo Roces, (Sydney, Australia); Ben Razon, Benjo Laygo, Heber Bartolome & Glenn Bautista, (Philippines); Claro Cortez, China & Alexandra Reilly, (Austria).

BANGGAAN
Cyberspace is for artists to explore. In this new millennium, a new frontier, "a new age", presents itself for artists to create novel expressions. the internet has opened a world that brings artists from all corners of this earth together, one on one, to exchange sentiments and ideas, and to directly and openly converse visually and digitally through distant space, free from the restricted barriers of museums, galleries, and mass media. It is a new world for Art.

***
Prov.: Direct from Artist



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Thursday, July 01, 2004

"BASEBALL HOSTESS" (2004) (OIL ON BOARD) by MARVIN HUMPHREY
Location: Library, Pygmalion-First Floor

"ICED MUFFINS" (2003) (OIL ON CANVAS) by MARVIN HUMPHREY
Location: Library, Pygmalion-First Floor

"LANDSCAPE (RAIN ON SPRING MOUNTAIN)" (2001) (OIL ON CANVAS, 11 x 14 IN) by MARVIN HUMPHREY
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

(SECOND MENTION DUE TO UPDATE)

UPDATE:

Just acquired our third Marvin Humphrey work (the first listed). Mr. Humphrey is one of the mail delivery people for St. Helena. I stumbled across his work when he had an exhibit at the St. Helena Library. His show was sold out, but we contacted him directly and got his "Iced Muffins." Being a writer, I often go to the post office and I soon noticed that on the bulletin board there, they would hang one of his paintings. That's how we got his "Landscape" painting, and now this latest "Baseball Hostess" painting of cupcakes! He's a treasure as his paintings have a popular local following. After someone acquires his painting from the post office bulletin board, another Humphrey painting soon would hang. I have yet to see a single painting that would disappoint.

It also all makes me very curious about him -- he's clearly well-educated and well-trained ... and with possibly a great sense of humor (?), what with the painted-onto-canvas frame on "Landscape" and how he delivers lush, abstract-expressionist style brushstrokes while creating figurative images....

***
Prov.: St. Helena Post Office; Direct from Artist



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