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Sunday, August 08, 2004

ANTIQUE BUNG HAMMER
Location: Library, Pygmalion-First Floor

For obvious reasons, Galatea is always interested in wine-related accouterments. We picked this bung hammer up because of its sculptural quality -- it's heftier than the ones pictured on this link.

***
Prov.: Mostly French, Calistoga, CA



PITCHER by RICHARD ESTEBAN
Location: Dining Room, Pygmalion-First Floor

POT (PURPLE) by RICHARD ESTEBAN
Location: Dining Room, Pygmalion-First Floor

POT (GREEN) by RICHARD ESTEBAN
Location: Living Room, Pygmalion-First Floor

[SECOND MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:

Moved pitcher from Charles D'Amboise Wine Cellar to Dining Room. Added two new pots.

Richard Esteban is among the finest of contemporary Provencal ceramic artists. (According to Mostly French,) Richard learned his craft in Vallauris, one of the few great pottery centers in France, along with Cliousclat, Biot and Uzes. He began his apprenticeshipt at 16 and learned to throw with the last old throwers of these famous ateliers. He continued his apprenticeship in Cliousclat with Philip Sourdive, one of the few master potters still allive in France at that time.

Richard now has his own atelier in Aigues Vives, not far from the Mediterranean. There, each piece of pottery is thrown, slipped, dried in the sun and then glazed with "alquifoux." The ancient process, which is not often used today, gives the colors a transparency and intensity which has not been equaled by enamel.

Richard's work is known for its intensity of color and frequent use of traditional pottery shapes and designs (e.g. the leche frite, pichets, poelon, baratee a beurre, pegau, among others). The color and simple shapes give his work their stunning appearance.

***
Prov.: Mostly French, Calistoga, CA



Friday, August 06, 2004

"TWL" (renamed "BLACK LIGHTNING" after its image appeared on my book entitled with same name) (1997) (OIL ON WOOD, 22 X 22 IN) by THERESA CHONG
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"EIGHT (A&B)" (1998) (OIL ON WOOD) (TWO PANELS, EACH 40 X 20 1/2 IN, HUNG 1/2 INCH APART) by THERESA CHONG
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

DRAWING ON RICE PAPER (Details to Come) by THERESA CHONG
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

MONEY & STAMP SERIES (2000) (PRINTS) by THERESA CHONG
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

DRAWINGS FOR POETRY COLLABORATION by THERESA CHONG
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

DRAWING WITH BOOK (Details to Come) by THERESA CHONG
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

DRAWING WITH BOY (Details to Come) by THERESA CHONG
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

[THIRD MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:

Theresa Chong is currently exhibiting at what looks to be a very interesting four-person exhibit at KerriganCampbell in NYC. Here are details:

Sensitive Dependence on Initial Conditions:
Theresa Chong•Yvonne Estrada•Eva Lee•Henry Mandell

Curated by Lisa Hatchadoorian
DATES: July 23–September 3, 2004

LOCATION:
317 East 9th Street (between 1st and 2nd Avenues)

HOURS:
Thursday through Sunday, noon - 7pm, or by appointment

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
New York. The abstract drawings of Theresa Chong, Yvonne Estrada, Eva Lee, and Henry Mandell refer to a history of abstraction, gesture, and mark making embedded within the recent tradition of art. At the same time, their nuanced, and layered works visually weave in concepts of science, such as entropy and chaos, which are predicated on change, disorder, and unpredictability. All four artists create drawings of complex systems displaying structures and patterns that mimic the irregularities found in nature. Their artwork also captures the inherent and simple beauty of undulating lines, points, marks, and symbols that are tools employed to chart a visual and theoretical course through space in both science and art.

The most recent series of drawings by Theresa Chong utilize aspects of the handmade and the mechanical to conceptualize an area that is both vast and minute. On an inky blue-black or white sheet of wispy rice paper, Chong maps a course through the picture plane made up entirely of gently swooping lines and dots that cluster and break apart according to their own internal logic and structure. Chong doodles and visualizes her abstract gestures on the computer and then transfers the mechanized marks by hand onto the rich, texturized rice paper field. Visually, her drawings present an all-over expanse that can be likened to clusters of starry matter in space. Artistically, her pared down gestures unfold and loop back on themselves, taking the eye with it. Scientifically, her deft use of line conjures up concepts of chaos theory where order masquerades as disorder and spontaneous change is constant.

The intimate, and humorous drawings of Yvonne Estrada present an interconnected and slightly surreal world that consists of various abstract and stylized gestures, combined with floating biological forms, calligraphic motifs, and repetitive decorative marks. Estrada mingles these different types of marks and gestures in layered, poetic compositions that expand and release the markings from their original meaning as inscriptions on a flat field. She creates a quasi-scientific/artistic hybrid space where the placement and aesthetic use of her lexicon of symbols yields unpredictable results and amusing juxtapositions of form and meaning.

Eva Lee, like Theresa Chong, creates her abstract drawings with the most basic of marks: connective dots and lines. Her creative process though, takes place entirely on the plane of the paper. The artist courts chance and an unpredictable nature in her work, as she is never sure what the final outcome will be from her minute starting points. Lee generates an abstract conception of space that is malleable, fluid, constantly moving and turning on its own axis. Akin to Yvonne Estrada, Lee also recycles a group of standard forms in the shapes of circles, gourds, and biomorphous organisms that populate her deep, endless semi-cosmic space.

The undulating, repetitive, and layered abstractions of Henry Mandell are created solely on a computer from sentences of text that refer to weather in its endlessly unpredictable patterns. Playing and toying with minute variations in line and letter placement, his drawings disguise any legibility or inherent meaning from the words themselves. Language is broken down and built up as pure form in an endless lyrical sequencing. His treatment of text treads a boundary between the deterministic loops and curlicues of our own handwriting and thought process to the mechanistic patterns and chance uncertainties that occur within the computer as various systems play themselves out in the same space over time.

For images or more information about “Sensitive Dependence on Initial Conditions,” please contact the gallery, 212 505 7196 or via email, info@kerrigancampbell.com.
***
Prov.: Danese Gallery, New York; Direct from Artist



Tuesday, August 03, 2004

TEST

"[] (HAND, MAPPED OUT, PAINTED/DRAWN AGAINST HAND-MADE PAPER) by SANTIAGO BOSE
Location: Babaylan Lodge

[FIFTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:


The Philippine Inquirer just featured an article on Santi Bose's new monograph:

The Life and Times of Santi Bose
By Sylvia L. Mayuga
INQ7.net

RIGHT now – as the Philippines hunkers down to hard decisions on how to spend the next six years, the US begins to consider a replacement for George W. Bush, and the Third World fights for survival at the WTO conference – is the best time to dive into a new book on the life and times of the late Filipino artist Santi Bose.

“Espiritu Santi: The Strange Life & Stranger Legacy of Santiago Bose” was launched (cover photo) last weekend with the same uncanny sense of shifting global zeitgeist as Ermita magazine, the first publishing venture by editor Krip Yuson and publisher Boy Yuchengco in 1976.

That was the third year of Marcos’ martial law. This year 2004 is the third in Dubya’s war on “terrorism.” This kind of coincidence is what my generation learned (from that scholar of the human soul Carl Gustav Jung) to call “synchronicity” – a pattern of parallelism and relationship between events apparently separated in time.

Jung challenged the “axiomatic truth” of the “principle of causality” enshrined in the Critique of Pure Reason by the philosopher Immanuel Kant – the book that set the tone for the so-called “Age of Enlightenment.” Ironically, that age’s enthronement of reason became the seedbed of modern colonialism’s ongoing violence against both man and nature.

“(A) great challenge is setting in,” Jung wrote in 1949. “The axioms of causality are being shaken to their foundations: we know now that what we term natural laws are merely statistical truths and thus must necessarily allow for exceptions…If we leave things to nature, we see a very different picture: every process is partially or totally interfered with by chance so that under natural circumstances, a course of events absolutely conforming to specific laws is almost an exception.”

In short, life has a lot more mystery than reason can grasp – and it would do itself and the planet a favor to recognize hidden synchronicities in nature and human affairs.

So what does all that have to do with Espiritu Santi? Simply this: that Santi Bose, born on the year Carl Jung articulated the law of synchronicity, is well worth knowing as the original mixed media artist of our generation. To speak of his life is to speak of his times, his artist comrades-in-arms, and the vital tracks they left together for kindred spirits to follow.

Now in their 50s and 60s, Santi’s generation entered adulthood in the dialectical boot camp of Cold War, fell in love between the crossed missiles of the American Eagle and the Russian Bear, married between the crossed swords of dictatorship and communist insurgency at home, had children under the hovering threat of nuclear extinction.

Santi himself, half-Tingguian and half-Ilocano, was born and raised in Baguio when it was still an American military R & R station. An early sketcher and doodler high on rock ‘n roll, he discovered Filipino student activism where it was best learned in the early 70s – at U.P. Diliman. Strumming the guitar, experimenting with photography and mind-bending drugs, finding his gift for the visual pun going over big with his peers, Santi’s daemon emerged soon enough in times that seemed designed to provoke it.

His studies were constantly interrupted by strikes and protest action. The declaration of martial law aborted the opening of his first one-man exhibit. As the Marcos dictatorship seeped into everything that made life worth living to an artist, scarce was the job that didn’t make a sellout necessary. And so Santi and his young family left Manila and moved up to Baguio (image, 132KB) – and that made all the difference.

What followed were two decades of driving introspective stakes deep into the main problematic that united the artists of his generation: who and what the Filipino is; how he and his community might survive a global hegemony under which the Philippines often seems a mere distant outpost of powerful America (image, 136KB).

This odyssey became the flash point of all of Santi Bose’s exuberant eurekas, the departure point of his restless search for ever-new materials and forms to defy Western artistic conventions and their matrix in a skewed global economy – and the root of new wisdom in indigenous spirituality and Philippine tribal cultures the times compelled him to perceive in their universality.

From the lyricism of his first paintings framed behind rescued old windows, to the evolution of collages, installations and performance pieces that began ranging the world with him in 1980, to his co-founding of the Baguio Arts Guild in multi-form integration with the people of Baguio and communities in the Cordillera hinterlands, Santi Bose articulated his hard-earned credo consistently:

“The best art chronicles its time and context. It reveals the inner aspiration of its audience. It articulates its moment. For me the best piece of installation is the phenomenon of the Banaue rice terraces. Not only is it life-giving; if it is considered as an art installation, the people’s lives are centered on it.”

The beauty of a life lived in the unique heartbeat of a generation breaking old molds and casting new ones together at home and abroad belonged as much to Santi Bose as to his coevals. “Espiritu Santi” has recovered and set down much of it in as many new voices as old ones that could still be tracked down in diaspora.

New limitations surrounded this brilliant new production by the old barkada but the sheer joy is that the same fire burns in enduring collective vision, once again overleaping time and space to farther limits.

***
Prov.: Direct From Artist



Sunday, August 01, 2004

"DON'T TOUCH ME" (2003) (MIXED MEDIA, 9.5 x 1.1 x 2 IN) INSTALLATION by STELLA LAI
Location: Foyer, Pygmalion-First Floor

"FOUR SEASONS VACATION -2" (2003) (gouache on paper, 30 X 22 in) by STELLA LAI
Location: Yellow Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

"FOUR SEASONS VACATION -4" (2003) (gouache on paper, 30 X 22 in) by STELLA LAI
Location: Yellow Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

"PUCHAA MASK" (2002) (YARN, 13 x 9 x 8 IN) SCULPTURE by STELLA LAI
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"PUCHAA IN BOX" (MIXED MEDIA, 2001) SCULPTURE by STELLA LAI
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"PUCHAA'S SHORTCUT" (2002) (ROTATING MOTOR AND MIXED MEDIA, 9 x 4 x 4 IN) SCULPTURE by STELLA LAI
Location: Library, Pygmalion-First Floor

"UNTITLED" (PUCHAA DRUNK AMONG WINE BOTTLES" (2003) DRAWING by STELLA LAI
Location: Library, Pygmalion-First Floor

"MTR SUPER HERO" (2003) (SILK SCREEN PRINT & HAND PAINTED PUSHPIN, #2/25) by STELLA LAI
Location: Turret Guest Bathroom, Pygmalion-First Floor

"[ ] PUCHAA AND CHECHE" DRAWING by STELLA LAI
Location: Library, Pygmalion-First Floor

EPHEMERA (DRAWINGS IN E.T.'S ART/POETRY JOURNAL, GALATEA GUEST BOOK, NLA AUCTION CHAPBOOK, & INVITATION AND INDIVIDUAL MASK MOLD FROM "DON'T TOUCH ME" INSTALLATION)Location: Library, Pygmalion-First and Second Floors

"FOR ___" (DRAWING) (2004) by STELLA LAI
Location: Red Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

[FOURTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

Just had dinner with Stella Lai and Julio Morales (Julio creates the next addition to Galatea's Art Collection; more details to come). Afterwards, Stella created the new drawing "For ____" which I plan to give to a friend who reads this blog, hence the anonymity for now. And here's news on their next exhibition!

The Gallery at Intersection
STATE OF THE NATION SUMMER AUCTION
August 10-20, 2004
446 Valencia (btwn 15/16)
Mission District
San Francisco, CA 94103
(415) 626-2787


Intersection's summer auction and biggest fundraiser of the year features the work of 50 Bay Area and National artists responding to the theme "state of the nation." Join us in supporting San Francisco's oldest alternative arts space and take home art by some of the Bay Area's best known artists, including;

Kim Abeles, Brad K. Alder, Katherine Aoki, Mike Arcega, Conrad Atkinson, Claudia Bernardi, Victor Cartagena, Scott Chernis, Jim Christensen, Binh Danh, Einar & Jamex de la Torre, Sergio de la Torre, Ala Ebtekar, Tia Factor, Robert Gutierrez, John Herschend, Jason Jagel, Xylor Jane, Stella Lai, Noah Lang, Richard Lang, Jose Ramon Lorma, Kara Maria, Mats!?, Alicia McCarthy, Michael McConnell, Sean McFarland, Leah Modigliani, Julio Morales, Michele Muennig, Tucker Nichols, Aaron Noble, Abner Nolan, Elisabeth Oppenheimer, Juan Carlos Quintana, Kyle Ranson, Will Rogan, Tim Rollins + K.O.S., Brion Nuda Rosch, Andrew Schoultz, Judith Selby, laura Splan, Jackie Sumell, Deth Sun, Sara Thustra, JP Villegas, Megan Wilson and Sandra Wong.


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