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Sunday, November 28, 2004

"AGENTS" (1996) (INK, GRAPHITE AND GEL MEDIUM ON CLEAR MYLAR, 17 x 11 IN) by SHARON LOUDEN
Location: Dining Room, Pygmalion-First Floor

"AGENTS" (1996) (INK, GRAPHITE AND GEL MEDIUM ON CLEAR MYLAR, 17 x 11 IN) by SHARON LOUDEN
Location: Dining Room, Pygmalion-First Floor

[FIFTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:


Sharon Louden, along with Chan Chao, will be exhibited by Numark Gallery at Scope Miami! Here's Numark's press release:

NUMARK GALLERY participating in SCOPE MIAMI
Townhouse Hotel, 150 20th Street -- ROOM 314
December 2 -5, 2004

CHAN CHAO
Echo -- new body of photographs

The gallery will have on hand several SHARON LOUDEN paintings from her upcoming show at Numark Gallery opening January 7, 2005.

INFO ON CHAN CHAO, ECHO --
Photographer Chan Chao captures the humanity of his subjects by photographing them at close range, front and center. The subject of Chao’s newest body of work, 'Echo', is the female nude. Returning to a subject he dealt with earlier in his career, the female nude is Chao’s most fully realized and provocative motif. Like Lucien Freud’s paintings or Rineke Dijkstra’s photographs, Chao’s unromanticized compositions challenge notions of the idealized female human form. Certainly not unaware of the feminist and political critique of the exposition of the female nude by male artists throughout art history, Chao tackles the subject of the nude as a vehicle to an emotionally forthright and honest psychological portrait.

Chao’s most recent body of work, “Burma: Something Went Wrong,” which was included in the 2002 Whitney Biennial, pictures pro-democracy guerillas, women and children caught in the ongoing struggle against Burma’s oppressive military regime. The series received a large degree of critical acclaim. Peter Schjeldahl, art critic for the New Yorker, singled out Chao’s work in his review of the 2002 Whitney Biennial:

“Chan’s heartbreaking pictures remind me why I like art. Addressing their subjects with scrupulous formality, [he] extend[s] [his] medium to see and say what is there to be seen and said… [and…] stand out sharply.”

INFO ON SHARON LOUDEN, TAILS INSTALLATION & THE LINGERING PAINTINGS --

Sharon Louden's installations and drawings give character to individual gestures through the illusion of movement, placement, and direction of marks. Her exhibition at Numark Gallery, opening January 7, 2005 will feature in the main gallery space a large-scale installation 'Tails', groupings of anthropomorphic sculptures assembled with thousands of strands of monofilament (fishing line) clamped by cage clips. Related to the 'Attenders' installation she created for the Kemper Museum (MO) in 2003, the Numark Gallery installation will be the first 'Tails'-related sculpture to utilize color.

The artist states:

"My mission is to take simple materials and transform them into things that are gestural and come alive as individual, humorous entities unto themselves…. By making massive groupings that are repetitive in nature, the groups appear to take over and gain their own presence as figures that live in the world."

The 'Lingering' series of minimal paintings, which Numark Gallery will take to Scope-Miami, relate directly to the 'Tails' large-scale installation. Embodying minimal gestures of line in empty space -- lines of gel and acrylic media drawn on a porcelain-like white surface created by many layers of sanded Venetian gesso -- the paintings developed originally from simple lines observed in bodies of motion.

For additional information on Scope-Miami, please visit www.scope-art.com or contact Michael Sellinger at 212.268.1522, michael@scope-art.com.

To view images by Chan Chao or Sharon Louden, please visit our website at WWW.NUMARKGALLERY.COM or Sharon Louden's website at WWW.SHARONLOUDEN.COM.

Numark Gallery
625 - 27 E Street, NW
Washington, DC 20004
www.numarkgallery.com
T - 202.628.3810/F - 202.628.1925

***
Prov.: Haines Gallery, San Francisco



Thursday, November 25, 2004

"ENSO" (DRAWING ON FOUR PIECES OF HANDMADE PAPER) by MAX GIMBLETT
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"UNTITLED" (COLLABORATIVE DRAWING ON BUTCHER PAPER BETWEEN MAX GIMBLETT, E.T., T.P. AND NOMI) (2001)
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"[]" (2003) (PRINT, 15/25) by MAX GIMBLETT
Location: Yellow Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

"UNTITLED" (SUMI INK DRAWING AGAINST ASIA SOCIETY PROGRAMS) (2001) by MAX GIMBLETT
Location: Babaylan Lodge

POETRY/ART BROADSIDE by MAX GIMBLETT AND E.T.
Location: Babaylan Lodge

"DOUBLE HEADED CREATURE FEATURE" (ARTISTS' BOOK, 17.5 X 7 X 0.5 IN) by MAX GIMBLETT AND JOHN YAU WITH TOBY HINES
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

DRAWINGS IN TWO OF E.T.'S ART/POETRY JOURNALS by MAX GIMBLETT
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

DRAWINGS IN TWO COPIES OF MAX GIMBLETT MONOGRAPH by MAX GIMBLETT (2003)
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

EPHEMERA by MAX GIMBLETT
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

[THIRD MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:


New Zealand's Bartley Nees Gallery announces a new exhibition coming up for Max Gimblett:


Max Gimblett
The Rose of Paracelsus --­ recent paintings


Bartley Nees Gallery, Wellington, New Zealand
7- 23 December 2004, 11- 29 January 2005

We are delighted to be able to have Max Gimblett¹s recent 2004 paintings available for viewing in the gallery, at the same time that his major survey show 'The brush of all things' is on at City Gallery Wellington. This is Max¹s first solo show with us and we are proud to have an artist of his stature show in our gallery. The title of the show comes from the short story of the same name by the Argentinian writer Jorge Luis Borges. In taking his title from a story which is at core a meditation on the nature of the metaphysical/human journey, Gimblett is perhaps commenting on the process of viewing art and the fact that we all bring our own life experiences to the experiencing and ‘reading¹ of art - which is in itself an act of meditation.

Images and more information about the exhibition will be online from 7 December
 
With best wishes
Alison Bartley and Tim Nees

--

Bartley Nees Gallery
147 Cuba Street, Wellington
Opening hours: Tuesday - Friday 11am - 5.30pm, Saturday 11am - 3pm
Phone: 04 801 9795
Please visit our website at http://www.bartleyneesgallery.co.nz/
to view our current exhibition and our online catalogue of works in stock

***
Prov.: Direct from Artist



Tuesday, November 23, 2004

"[] (Color Abstract)" by VENANCIO "V.C." IGARTA
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"[] (Color Abstract)" (1984) by VENANCIO "V.C." IGARTA
Location: Yellow Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

"[] (Color Abstract)" (1984) by VENANCIO "V.C." IGARTA
Location: Library Bathroom, Pygmalion-First Floor

"[] (Self-Portrait)" (INK ON PAPER) by VENANCIO "V.C." IGARTA
Location: Babaylan Lodge

"[] (Self-Portrait)" (INK ON PAPER) by VENANCIO "V.C." IGARTA
Location: Babaylan Lodge

(SECOND MENTION DUE TO UPDATE)

UPDATE:


Update, via today's entry on my primary Blog, The Chatelaine's Poetics:

FOR VENANCIO "V.C." IGARTA

Igarta arrived in the U.S. in 1930 at age 18. In California, he worked in the lettuce farms of San Fernando Valley and the asparagus farms in Stockton. The Great Depression was underway and many Filipino migrant works became jobless after being targets of racial prejudice. In our conversations, Igarta often mentioned a sister he left behind in the Philippines whose advice he never forgot during his most difficult years: "Never beg." Traveling eastward, Igarta arrived in New York City in 1934, jobless and penniless.

Igarta began his art studies in 1937 at the National Academy of Design where he invested his meager salary of $1.50 a day on enrollment costs. The following year, he moved his studies to the Art Students League. He also would come to have his first exhibition in 1938 when one of his watercolors was chosen for a juried show at the Pennsylvania Academy. In May 1942, his "Northern Philippines" was exhibited at the Ferargil Gallery, and then featured in FORTUNE as part of a review. The publicity benefited Igarta as the painting would come to be part of a national juried show at the Met. Subsequently, he would come to show in other major museums and with such renowned artists as William de Kooning, Fernan Leger, Man Ray, Ben Shahn and Rufino Tamayo.
--from "Meditations on Ilokano Abstractions"


As regards December gigs, I certainly should include the exhibit "POETRY and its ARTS: Bay Area interactions 1954-2004" -- read poet/curator Steve Dickison's notice below as it's self-explanatory.

I'm moved to be part of this exhibit, not so much for myself as for the foremost -- but often ignored -- artist from the Manong Generation, V.C. Igarta. Three of his color field works -- including his very FIRST ONE which has never been exhibited before -- will be part of this exhibit because he was part of my "Six Directions" project. I'm glad to help recover/reveal some of V.C.'s art works because, as I wrote in an article on him for OurOwnVoice:

In front of my computer where I compose poems, fiction and essays— where, in other words, I live the lives I prefer to live by writing them out—hangs a self-portrait by the artist Venancio "V.C." Igarta. He had sketched the drawing when he turned 87 years old, captioning it "Am getting blind." Stuck to the lower-right-hand corner of its frame is a June 2000 newspaper clipping with the headline "Painter VC Igarta dies at 89." I retain this depressing image over my computer to remind me: Igarta asked me to write about him and his art, but I didn't—couldn't—while he was alive.
Which is to say, I became active in trying to do what I can to lift Igarta's works out from obscurity only after his death, and this exhibit provides another means for me to honor V.C. Igarta's life and (in) paintings.

Anyway, here's the official:

The Poetry Center
presents


WHAT: POETRY and its ARTS: Bay Area interactions 1954-2004
WHEN: Exhibit opening: Saturday December 11, 2004 (noon to 4:30 pm)
Closing date: Saturday April 16, 2005
Galleries open to the public Wed.-Sat., noon to 4:30 pm
WHERE: @ California Historical Society, 678 Mission St. (4 doors east of 3rd St.,
downtown San Francisco, near Montgomery BART), 415-357-1848
CONTACT: The Poetry Center, telephone: 415-338-2227, email: poetry@sfsu.edu

The exhibit POETRY and its ARTS: Bay Area interactions 1954-2004 will open to the public on Saturday December 11, 2004, and will occupy the galleries at California Historical Society in downtown San Francisco's museum district for 17 weeks, until April 16, 2005. More than 100 original works --many never publicly exhibited-- by over 80 individuals will be on display. This first-of-its-kind exhibit represents a collaboration between the Poetry Center at San Francisco State University, currently observing its 50th anniversary with poetry programs throughout the city, and the California Historical Society. The exhibit offers a multi-faceted window onto the rich interactions that have taken place over the past half-century, centered around San Francisco's celebrated poetry community.

The exhibit, curated by Poetry Center Director Steve Dickison, is focused on:

~ art made by poets
~ poet-artist collaborations
~ works by artists in poets' circles

The exhibit will prominently feature San Francisco poet and visual artist Norma Cole's site-specific installation Collective Memory, a multimedia work situated in the foyer of the gallery, made in collaboration with the Poetry Center and sponsored by the Creative Work Fund. Cole's activities will involve the composition of a work of poetry within the space of the gallery, with subsequent publication as a fine-print artist's edition by Granary Books of New York City.

A broad spectrum of individual artworks, beginning in the 1950s with original pieces by prominent poet-artists close to the Poetry Center from its early days, will lead up to a diverse array of contemporary artworks that carry on the Bay Area's interactive poet-artist traditions.

Exceptional earlier pieces exhibited in the show include:

* Kenneth Rexroth's distinctive, delicate work with pastels
* rarely shown collaborations and individual works by Robert Duncan and Jess
* Kenneth Patchen's fantastical painted beasts
* Allen Ginsberg's West Coast photos from 1955 during the time of his poem Howl to 1984
* Saburo Hasegawa's wildly exuberant calligraphic work based on Lao Tsu's Tao Te Ching
* an original private press work by William Everson (Brother Antoninus), who undertook the printer's trade while in a World War II Conscientious Objector camp in Waldport, Oregon
* paintings by poets Michael McClure, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Diane di Prima
* Mary Oppen's torn-paper collage depicting her husband, poet George Oppen
* calligraphic works by friends and Reed College alumni Lew Welch, Philip Whalen, and Gary Snyder, students of legendary calligrapher Lloyd Reynolds
* surreal balladeer Helen Adam's otherworldly collage-work
* David Meltzer's collages mining the iconography of Jewish Kabbalah
* Fran Herndon's collages invoking pop-culture icons Willie Mays and Marilyn Monroe
* rare visual works by poets Robin Blaser, Jack Spicer, Madeline Gleason, and Barbara Guest
* major early paintings by Black Mountain College alumni Tom Field and Paul Alexander, regarded as signal works of the time
* the generation of assemblage artists that coalesced in the Bay Area during the 1950s will be represented with works by Wallace Berman, Jess, Bruce Conner, and George Herms

Among new pieces in the exhibit, highlights include recent works by Bay Area painters Carlos Villa, Amy Trachtenberg, Gustavo Ramos Rivera, Arnold J Kemp, and Oliver Jackson. The exhibit will not focus intensively on books, though several outstanding examples of area book-arts will appear on display. Individual photo-portraits and historical shots by area photographers will accent the painted, drawn, handprinted, and constructed artworks.

"In many ways, this exhibit is a tribute to the poet-artist galleries that had short but significant lifespans in San Francisco of the 1950s and '60s: King Ubu Gallery, the Six Gallery, Batman Gallery, Borregard's Museum, Buzz Gallery, and the North Beach coffeehouses and bars that did double duty as art-spaces. The San Francisco of this period served as a geographic confluence of radically realized individual and collective visions. Poets and artists together as friends, lovers, rivals, and audience to one another's practice, creatively imagined a city perched on the country's far coast, and worked together to bring that city into being."
--Steve Dickison, curator of the exhibit

POETRY and its ARTS: Bay Area interactions 1954-2004 is dedicated to extraordinary San Francisco artist Jess (1923-2004), companion of the late poet Robert Duncan, pioneer of California assemblage art, and great friend to the poets, and to San Francisco literary editor Donald M. Allen (1912-2004), whose 1960 anthology The New American Poetry 1945-1960, and subsequent work as editor and publisher, was instrumental in opening up audiences for an innovative counter-tradition of American poets, many of whom have works on display in the exhibit.

The exhibit will also feature several additional public programs, details to be announced, to take place within the gallery space and at other San Francisco locations.

In conjunction with the exhibit, three special evenings of poetry-related film and video are scheduled to take place November 18, December 2, and December 12, under the series heading Moving Picture Poetics. The series is curated by San Francisco cinema artist Konrad Steiner, and is a collaboration between the Poetry Center and San Francisco Cinematheque. For program details, show times, and locations, contact San Francisco Cinematheque, http://www.sfcinematheque.org, 415-552-1990, or the Poetry Center's website: http://www.sfsu.edu/~poetry.

Gallery admission for POETRY and its ARTS is $3 for adults. Students with ID, $1.00. High school students, with identification, can be admitted free of charge, and docent tours designed for high-school age audiences can be arranged by contacting the Poetry Center, 415-338-2227, e-mail: poetry@sfsu.edu. Galleries at California Historical Society, 678 Mission Street (4 doors east of 3d St.) are open to the public Wednesday thru Saturday, noon to 4:30 pm.

POETRY and its ARTS: Bay Area interactions 1954-2004
ARTISTS IN THE EXHIBIT


Juvenal Acosta
Helen Adam
Etel Adnan
Paul Alexander
Gordon Baldwin
Dodie Bellamy
Franco Beltrametti
Bill Berkson
Wallace Berman
Ronald Bladen
Robin Blaser
Jack Boyce
Joe Brainard
Frances Butler
Rene Castro
John Cage
Enrique Chagoya
Chuong Huang Chung
Tom Clark
Norma Cole
Bruce Conner
Kate Delos
Diane di Prima
Robert Duncan
Ernie Edwards
Amy Evans McClure
William Everson
Lawrence Ferlinghetti
Tom Field
Russell Fitzgerald
Christa Fleischmann
Jack D. Forbes
Kathleen Fraser
Nemi Frost
Juan R. Fuentes
Allen Ginsberg
Madeline Gleason
Guillermo Gomez-Peña
Robert Grenier
Barbara Guest
Donald Guravich
Philip Guston
Lou Harrison
Carla Harryman
Saburo Hasegawa
Bobbie Louise Hawkins
Mary Ann Hayden
Lyn Hejinian
George Herms
Fran Herndon
Jack Hirschman
Tanya Hollis
Leo Holub
V. C. Igarta
Deborah Iyall
Oliver Jackson
Colter Jacobsen
Harry Jacobus
Jess
Alastair Johnston
Lawrence Jordan
Larry Keenan
Arnold J Kemp
Kevin Killian
R. B. Kitaj
Joanne Kyger
Marianne Kolb
Robert LaVigne
David Levi-Strauss
Clarence Major
Michael McClure
William MacNeil
David Meltzer
Jack Micheline
Michael Myers
Arthur Okamura
Mary Oppen
Kenneth Patchen
Raymond Pettibon
John Kelley Reed
Harry Redl
Kenneth Rexroth
Felicia Rice
Stan Rice
Gustavo Ramos Rivera
Tasha Robbins
Rena Rosenwasser
Tina Rotenberg
Floyd Salas
Leslie Scalapino
George Schneeman
C. R. Snyder
Gary Snyder
Jack Spicer
Eileen Tabios
Glenn Todd
Amy Trachtenberg
Truong Tran
Carlos Villa
Lew Welch
Philip Whalen
Jonathan Williams
Will Yakulic

# # #

=================
Steve Dickison, Director
The Poetry Center & American Poetry Archives
San Francisco State University
1600 Holloway Avenue ~ San Francisco CA 94132
http://www.sfsu.edu/~poetry

***
Prov.: Direct from Artist



Monday, November 22, 2004

"[] (HAND, MAPPED OUT, PAINTED/DRAWN AGAINST HAND-MADE PAPER) by SANTIAGO BOSE
Location: Babaylan Lodge

[SIXTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:


Poet, fictionist and critic/editor Juaniyo Arcellana offers a review of Santiago Bose's monograph in the current issue of the Philippine Star. I was honored to be included in this book with two art essays and several poems dedicated to Santi, and which will also be featured in my 2005 book, I Take Thee, English, For My Beloved (Marsh Hawk Press, 2005). Here's Juaniyo's review:

Santiago A La Bose
By Juaniyo Arcellana
The Philippine STAR 11/22/2004

 
Or Ermita a la Bose. The publication earlier this year of the commemorative tribute Espiritu Santi: The strange life and even stranger legacy of Santiago Bose (Water Dragon 2004) more than does justice to the artist who passed away in December 2002. It is almost an unwieldy coffee-table-size soft-cover book that is however reader-friendly and captures the spirit of the old Ermita magazine of 1976 – for which Bose was art director – as well the artist’s own wildly paradoxical work.

Boy Yuchengco, publisher of Ermita and one of the main men behind Espiritu Santi, says, "Sinadya namin ‘yon," when referring to the strange tribute being just about the size of the magazine that has achieved a kind of urban legend.

One can’t help but get personal when reading through Espirtu Santi, the same way one can hardly remain a fence-sitter when perusing an installation or oil or mixed media piece by Bose, who was as much a cultural shaman as anyone in his generation (born in the late 1940s-early 1950s). Yet even the late artist himself in an interview admitted that maybe they liked to project themselves as shamans simply because it was a smart, magical way to get the ladies into bed.

Or as Robbie Robertson, guitarist of The Band, in the film The Last Waltz commented on how life was on the road for a musician in the early, struggling years: "You don’t get paid much, but you get a lot of pussy."

That Bose was an inveterate ladies’ man was no secret, and in Espiritu Santi we get to read accounts of friends as well as various women who knew him, not necessarily in the Biblical sense. But whatever wild oats the artist sowed in his lifetime, and for whatever mystical oats he may still be sowing in the afterward, these should not detract or lessen the impact of the truly original Filipino art that he created with a distinct worldview, not only raising the bar for local artists but also scrambling all our preconceived notions of what art should be.

What a treat it is then to get glimpses, albeit reduced to fit, of Bose’s work in this book, from the balancing act reaching critical mass in "Circo Simpao," to the mural he painted on the wall of a school in Sagada, to his first ramblings of blue clouds against pink skies, to the ominous cross-laden "Chance Meeting Between Father Tropa and Joseph Boyce." The colors and subjects Bose used almost made the viewer feel like he was looking at a painting for the first time, but I’m sure you’ve heard that one before. What more if you saw the work live, the very acrylic or bark or amulet’s metal staring you in the face that you could almost smell Baguio or some such natural mystic in the air, in which rarefied atmosphere the artist grew up as a bohemian par excellence always on the lookout for anything that would nurture his art.

And so we get to read the aftermath of his death, and how around a week before D-day he was seen at favorite hangout Penguin by proprietor Ami Misciano, "nagpapaalam na pala si gago," the subsequent gnashing of teeth and exchange of e-mails over the sad news, the artist dead at 53, burning out rather than fading away as that Neil Young song goes. Then during the launch of this book at Penguin for what would have been the guy’s 55th birthday last July, his works were on display at the gallery, including the self-portrait on the wooden door of perception.

Yet even those with hardly a rudimentary knowledge of art and theory might recognize echoes of some primal kin in Bose’s work, the same way pedestrians might stop perfunctorily over a stall of herbs and talismans sold by a toothless old woman in Quiapo, and catch a whiff of grassroots medicine or similar heady brew. The guy was an original, what else can one say, and more than that, he had a sense of humor such that when he smiled, you weren’t sure if he was laughing with or at you.

So when his editor at the old Ermita, Krip Yuson (who with Yuchengco forms the 1-2 punch behind this project), says at some point in the indigenously post-cubist text that Bose, unlike Elvis, has not left the building, we believe him.

There are some project proposals by Bose that have yet to be realized but, while ambitious, seem completely necessary in these days of global unraveling and concurrent dysfunctional politics. We speak of the Freedom Islands installation and performance exhibit that would gather 30 artists from claimant countries to the Spratly Islands – now, isn’t that more sensible than the so-called Bayanihan Fund, which for all its good intentions is at best laughable?

Or consider his work-forever-in-progress, yes perhaps even in the great beyond, entitled "Behind the Immigrant," wherein he is pictured with a white paper over his face in various tourist spots and with assorted important personages, etcetera, such that even while laid in his bier a photo was taken of the white paper over his face, Santi the immigrant to the other world.

Aside from the art criticism and the varied works obviously inspired or provoked by the Bose, easily most revealing would be the essays here by the women who knew him best: Wife, lovers, daughters. Peggy Bose’s words don’t have a hint of bitterness, rather tenderness and compassion for her wandering, brilliant man. Australian Pat Hoffie mentions the Black Madonna of Quiapo, which we surmise might have been a little trick Santi played on her, like the "selamat pangit" he pulled on his Indonesian friends. Lilledeshan Bose sounds shattered but slowly beginning to pick up the pieces, how well she conveys in words what her father’s art imparted to us in visuals.

But if Espiritu Santi is any indication, and if Bose’s life and work should serve as a cipher, then both art and literature have no boundaries. The possibilities are endless when the bululs and anitos (the gods not the incoherent motels) are listening, and we suddenly can no longer say that everybody knows this is nowhere.

***
Prov.: Direct from Artist



Monday, November 15, 2004

"UNTITLED" (2002) (GOUACHE ON WOOD PANEL) by CLARE ROJAS
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"UNTITLED" (2003) COMMISSIONED SITE-SPECIFIC MURAL INSTALLATION (GOUCHE/LATEX ON WALL) by CLARE ROJAS
Location: Master Bedroom Hallway, Pygmalion-2nd Floor

[FOURTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:


Clare Rojas just opened up a new exhibition, as follows:

CLARE ROJAS
TABLE TURNER

November 12 - December 18. 2004

Deitch Projects 76 Grand Street space has been recreated inside the 18 Wooster Street gallery to accommodate Clare Rojas' installation, a walk-in fusion of drawing, painting, sculpture and video animation.

Deitch Projects
18 Wooster Street
New York, NY 10013
212 343 7300


***
Prov.: Lizabeth Oliveira Gallery, Culver City, CA



FOUR "DECAYING ORANGE" PHOTOGRAPHS (2004) by MEL VERA CRUZ
Location: Babaylan Lodge

FOUR "EROTIC LEMON" PHOTOGRAPHS (2004) by MEL VERA CRUZ
Location: Babaylan Lodge

"[] SILK-SCREENED COLLAGE ON CARDBOARD (WHITE)" (2004) by MEL VERA CRUZ
Location: Babaylan Lodge

"[] SILK-SCREENED COLLAGE ON CARDBOARD (BLUE)" (2004) by MEL VERA CRUZ
Location: Babaylan Lodge

[THIRD MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:


Mel Vera Cruz sends over four more photographs of an orange decaying. Whereas his lemons depict the fruit erotically, the oranges can be viewed to depict the decay of romance. Interesting juxtaposition!

Thanks Mel!

***
Prov.: Direct from Artist



TWO SMALL PITCHERS by SYLVIE AND FRANCOIS FRENAIS
Location: Library, First Floor

PLATTER by SYLVIE AND FRANCOIS FRENAIS
Location: Galatea Offsite - San Francisco Apartment

[SECOND MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:


Picked up platter.

Sylvie and Francois Frenais create their pottery in the littel valley of Sampigny les Maranges in Burgundy, just outside Beaune. They studied in the Rhone Valley at Cliousclat with Richard Esteban and Jane Norbury, two of their favorite potters. The Frenais live in an ancien moulin (old mill) in a bucolic spot next to a stream where they have their home and large studio. They often get their inspiration from ancient pottery pieces and techniques. In France, they sell only at their own studio or at "Tuile a loup" in Paris on the rue Daubenton (in the 5eme).

***
Prov.: Mostly French, Calistoga, CA



COIFFEUSE (CIRCA 1880, BURGUNDY) (WALNUT W/ MARBLE)
Location: Galatea Offsite - San Francisco Apartment

Accompanied by a Reproduction "Smokers' Bench"

***
Prov.: Mostly French, Calistoga, CA



Friday, November 05, 2004

"[] (FOAM, CONTACT PAPER, SHADOW BOX-TYPE FRAME)" by STEPHANIE SYJUCO
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

[SECOND MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:


Stephanie Syjuco is featured in the group exhibition BOTANY 12 at Sonoma County Museum of Art, October 15, 2004 - February 13, 2005.

(Some of you gentle readers may remember the article I'd written on Stephanie's work, published by OurOwnVoice.)


***
Prov.: New Langton Arts, San Francisco



Wednesday, November 03, 2004

test

"TWL" (renamed "BLACK LIGHTNING" after its image appeared on my book entitled with same name) (1997) (OIL ON WOOD, 22 X 22 IN) by THERESA CHONG
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"EIGHT (A&B)" (1998) (OIL ON WOOD) (TWO PANELS, EACH 40 X 20 1/2 IN, HUNG 1/2 INCH APART) by THERESA CHONG
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

DRAWING ON RICE PAPER (Details to Come) by THERESA CHONG
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

MONEY & STAMP SERIES (2000) (PRINTS) by THERESA CHONG
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

DRAWINGS FOR POETRY COLLABORATION by THERESA CHONG
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

DRAWING WITH BOOK (Details to Come) by THERESA CHONG
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

DRAWING WITH BOY (Details to Come) by THERESA CHONG
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

[FOURTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

AND

"MOONLIGHT" (1999) (WATERBASED MIXED MEDIA ON WOOD, 24 X 24 IN) by RICHARD TSAO
Location: Atop Turret Steps, Pygmalion-Second Floor

[SECOND MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:


PAPER AND PROCESS
Richard Tsao, Gwenn Thomas, Il Lee, Alexandra do Carmo and Theresa Chong

Opening Reception: Tuesday, November 9, 2004, 6 – 8 PM
Exhibition Dates: November 9 - December 10, 2004
Exhibition Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, 9am – 3pm and by appointment

Art Projects International
29 Greenwich Street, Suite 5B
New York, NY 10013
For more information: 212.343.2599 or http://www.artprojects.com

PRESS RELEASE
The disparate works on paper by the five artists in Paper and Process are a vital reflection of the rich pluralism of today’s contemporary art world. The exhibition offers conceptual investigations, studies of abstract line and form, and imagery as diverse as dinosaurs and floral patterns. The works are the result of a range of activity from simply applying ink to paper with pen, to digital processes, to unorthodox approaches to printing.

Richard Tsao shows for the first time in the U. S. examples from his Portrait series as well as his new Spaceship series of monoprints. In Portraits, photographically derived images of people, sometimes barely visible and other times more strongly colored, are contrasted with images borrowed from a variety of sources including historic Chinese stone inscriptions of gods or imprints of leaves. In Spaceships, bright blocks of bleeding color are applied over and against linear patterns of orchids. Tsao uses the press as a tool, like a brush for painting, to create studied variations on a theme.

Gwenn Thomas has created several new series of prints and works on paper that relate to her signature works on canvas. These dynamic, masterful orchestrations of abstract forms and marks—drawn rectangles of solid color, silhouettes of cut bits of cloth, depictions of paint strokes or a wayward bit of newsprint—are realized by hands-on manipulation of printing plates, generating digital prints, and drawing with ink.

Il Lee uses ballpoint pens to create—out of thousands of tangled lines—solid, mountainous forms and series of line-enmeshed shapes. Lee draws vigorously and with incisive focus. His rigorous process, hidden by the freedom of the mark-making, allows the viewer to retrace the history of each line and better understand the creation of the complex forms and multiple effects. With fidelity to his ballpoint pen medium, Lee makes intimate drawings as well as large works with monumental
presence.

Alexandra do Carmo wields a 005 Sakura pen to create drawings that are variations of a single image of a Tyrannosaurus rex from a children’s book. Isolated or floating across the paper, faint to ghostly-faint, red-brown, pointillistic renderings of T-Rex’s head, or parts of the head, repeat, creating ethereal landscapes that belie the fierceness of their progenitors.

Theresa Chong’s drawings with their dark grounds and multitudes of tiny white squares connected by fine lines are elegantly abstract, lyrically diagrammatic. On a computer, she makes layered compositions that she then enhances and translates by hand onto Japanese handmade paper. Maps without destinations, these constellations in gouache and pencil of finely rendered form and line have a luxuriant ntelligence.

Artists’ Profiles:

Richard Tsao, born in Bangkok, came to New York from Thailand in 1976. He lives and works in New York. Recent exhibitions include: Portraits, 100 Tonson Gallery, Bangkok, Thailand (2004); The Inverse Mirror, curated by Paul Laster, Chambers Fine Art, New York, NY (2003); and Paintings, Margaret Thatcher Projects, New York, NY. His solo exhibition Paintings and Works on Paper at the Queens Museum (Bulova), NY was curated by Jane Farver and Christina Yang.

Gwenn Thomas, born in Rhode Island, studied at The Cooper Union School of Art in New York and at the Sorbonne in Paris. She lives and works in New York. Recent exhibitions include: Multiple Encounters, Indira Gandhi National Center of the Arts, New Delhi, India (2004); The Michael Hoffman Tribute Collection, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, PA (2004); Gwenn Thomas, New Arts Program Exhibition Space, Kutztown, PA (2004); Gwenn Thomas: Recent Work, Art Projects International, New York, NY (2002); Gwenn Thomas, Galerie Hafemann, Weisbaden, Germany (2001).

Il Lee, born in Korea, studied in Seoul and New York, and now lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. Recent exhibitions include: Open House: Working in Brooklyn, curated by Charlotta Kotik, Brooklyn Museum of Art, Brooklyn, NY (2004) and Il Lee: New Drawings and Paintings, Art Projects International, New York, NY (2004). His latest new works are on view in NextNext Art at the Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM), curated by Dan Cameron, Senior Curator of the New Museum of Contemporary Art.

Alexandra do Carmo, born in Portugal, now lives and works in New York and is currently participating in the Whitney Independent Study Program. Recent exhibitions include: Wild M5, Sala do Veado, Nacional Natural History Museum, Lisbon, Portugal (2004); Micron 005 performance, Lugar Comum-Fabrica da Polvora, Barcarena Portugal (2004); Micron 005, Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, New York, NY (2002).

Theresa Chong, born in Seoul, Korea, lives and works in New York. Recent exhibitions include: New Works on Paper, Danese, New York, NY (2003); Young & Brash & Abstract, Anderson Gallery, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (2002); Finely Drawn: A Recent Gift of Contemporary Drawings, Weatherspoon Art Gallery, Greensboro, NC (2001); and The Draftsman’s Colors: 14 New Acquisitions from Johns to Chong, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY (2001).

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Prov.: TC: Danese, New York City & Direct from Artist
RT: Margaret Thatcher Projects, New York City



Monday, November 01, 2004

"BANNED IN PORT JEFFERSON" (2004) (5 X 7 IN) PAINTING by THOMAS FINK
location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"GOSSIP VI" (2003) (10 x 8 IN) PAINTING by THOMAS FINK
location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"DEAR ONE" (2002) PAINTING by THOMAS FINK
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"DOES THE MOON BLEED" (2002) PAINTING by THOMAS FINK
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

[FOURTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:


Thomas Fink is the featured artist in the newly-released Tin Lustre Mobile! Here's the more official announcement -- go check it out!

POETIC INHALATION ANNOUNCES

Tin Lustre Mobile volume 4 issue 7 is illustrated by the artistry of Thomas Fink...

With Featured Poets:
g. calhoun truluck
fortunato caragliano
ishle park
jd nelson
steve timm
shannon holman
w.b keckler

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Prov.: Direct from Artist


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