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Wednesday, February 23, 2005

"AMERICAN BLONDE" (1997) (ACRYLIC ON PANEL, 36 X 36 IN) by JAMES WESTWATER
Location: Master Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

"POMP" (1997) (ACRYLIC ON PANEL, 36 X 36 IN) by JAMES WESTWATER
Location: Master Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

"CAEDMON'S FIRST WORD" (1997) (ACRYLIC ON PANEL, 22 X 11 IN) by JAMES WESTWATER
Location: Master Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

"GRIFTER'S REWARD" (1997) (ACRYLIC ON PANEL, 11 X 11 IN) by JAMES WESTWATER
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"GARGLE" (1997) (ACRYLIC ON PANEL, 11 X 11 IN) by JAMES WESTWATER
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

THREE MATCHBOX PAINTINGS by JAMES WESTWATER
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

POSTCARD COLLAGE from JAMES WESTWATER
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

FOURTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE:

UPDATE:


UPDATE:
Congratulations to James Westwater whose retrospective -- looks fabulous! -- is now up at Rule Gallery in Denver! Here are details:

January 21 - March 5, 2005

James Westwater: 10 Years,
Geometric Narcissism, 1995 - 2005


Opening Reception:
Friday, January 21, 2005
6:00 - 9:00 pm

Here is the text from the gallery's official release:

JAMES WESTWATER

The term “Geometric Narcissism,” coined by Westwater, reveals the impetus behind his work. Narcissism generally implies a self-indulgent love of oneself, but also has connotations of a lack of empathy. Geometric Narcissism, or GeoNarc, is appropriate here since it is geometric oval or square shapes that serve as Westwater’s narcissistic stamp, or non-logo. This signature, placed over abstract compositions, appropriated images, and found objects, implies Westwater’s lack of empathy for these objects prior to his branding of them with the representation of himself. Through his narcissism, Westwater indulges his desire to make his mark, and in doing so, produces something greater than the source it came from. The results of Westwater’s indulgences of his ego are works with a minimal tone that at the same time carry the vast richness of history, walking a delicate line between impulse and reason.

From his studios in Santa Fe and Los Angeles, James Westwater’s work has traveled to exhibitions in Japan, London, Paris, New York and Los Angeles. Westwater’s works are held in numerous private and public collections, including Marcy and William Shatner in Los Angeles, Pélé in Brazil, Komar and Melamid in New York, and the Museum of Fine Arts in Santa Fe. Westwater’s recent work has been published in the new book 3-D Art/Techné.

***
Prov.: Linda Durham Gallery, Galisteo, N.M.

Tuesday, February 22, 2005

"SAFE IN MY ARMS (10.5", MASVINGO SERPENTINE) by KIZITO RWANZA
Location: Library, Pygmalion-First Floor

This Shona sculpture was a present from Galatea's first Artist-in-Residence, and it perfectly embodies the notion of Galatea keeping artists safe within her arms. Delighted to have it at home!

***
Prov.: Spirits in Stone, St. Helena, CA (Number: 195166)

Sunday, February 20, 2005

"BANNED IN PORT JEFFERSON" (2004) (5 X 7 IN) PAINTING by THOMAS FINK
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"GOSSIP VI" (2003) (10 x 8 IN) PAINTING by THOMAS FINK
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"DEAR ONE" (2002) PAINTING by THOMAS FINK
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"DOES THE MOON BLEED" (2002) PAINTING by THOMAS FINK
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"HAY(NA)KU 1" (2005) PAINTING by THOMAS FINK
Location: Blue Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

[FOURTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

Galatea adds a fifth painting, "Hay(na)ku 1" to its collection, courtesy of poet-painter Thomas Fink who painted a lovely abstract work with his trademark biomorphic/outer-space references.

The title relates to the poetic form I concocted, the hay(na)ku which are tercets where the first line is one word, the second line is comprised of two words, and the third line consists of three words. Thus, the biomorphic forms includes three sets of three blue lines, relating to the tercets that comprise the hay(na)ku. There's no particular consistency in the lengths of the blue lines since the words that comprise the hay(na)ku, too, have no constraints as regards length of words.

The blue forms are set against a backdrop of the colors red, white, and yellow which, together with blue, comprise the colors of both the U.S. and Philippine flags. The color diction, if you will, is apropos of how I characterize the hay(na)ku as a Filipino "diasporic" form. There are also spherical forms within the blue lines -- again befitting how the spheres can be planets, in turn referencing diaspora.

There's also a scribbling -- as in writing -- pattern in the background, befitting how one writes poems such as the hay(na)ku. As the scribbles occur, gold is the color uncovered, which is apt for how gold is the Buddhist color for enlightenment (how synchronistic that Tom is Buddhist).

Though the above were my thoughts in looking at Tom's work, Tom's answer to my response about his thought process shows I wasn't that far off the mark. He writes:

Dear Eileen,
I'm so glad you like "Hay(na)ku 1" and that you can easily identify the painting as relating to your wonderful poetic form. Since finishing your canvas, I finished #2 (20" x 16") and I expect in the next 6-8 months, I'll do 7-8 more at that larger scale (and maybe 1 even larger one).

Re the thought process of the "Hay(na)ku" series, for 2 or 3 months, I did a lot of drawings that didn't work, perhaps because 1) I didn't know how many gatherings of 3 shapes with the hay(na)ku-istic progressive elongation--1, 2, or 3-- would make for a good, dynamic composition; 2) when I realized that 3 x 3 "lines" would be best, I didn't figure out which should be coming out of a side of the canvas and which floating within the field; 3) I didn't sense which 3 corners should anchor the compositiom and which 1 should not be used; 4) the 3 groupings of 3 were not interacting well with each other compositionally; 5) some of the shapes of the "lines" were clunky; 6) the synergy of some of the first 5 points was, of course, negative. Once I had a decent drawing, it was evident that the colors of the painting should have some relation to the flag of the native land of the inventor of the poetic form.

Thank
you for
your strong encouragement,
Tom


THANK YOU, Tom!

***
Prov.: Direct from Artist

Friday, February 18, 2005

"ENSO" (DRAWING ON FOUR PIECES OF HANDMADE PAPER) by MAX GIMBLETT
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"UNTITLED" (COLLABORATIVE DRAWING ON BUTCHER PAPER BETWEEN MAX GIMBLETT, E.T., T.P. AND NOMI) (2001)
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"[]" (2003) (PRINT, 15/25) by MAX GIMBLETT
Location: Yellow Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

"UNTITLED" (SUMI INK DRAWING AGAINST ASIA SOCIETY PROGRAMS) (2001) by MAX GIMBLETT
Location: Babaylan Lodge

POETRY/ART BROADSIDE by MAX GIMBLETT AND E.T.
Location: Babaylan Lodge

"DOUBLE HEADED CREATURE FEATURE" (ARTISTS' BOOK, 17.5 X 7 X 0.5 IN) by MAX GIMBLETT AND JOHN YAU WITH TOBY HINES
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

DRAWINGS IN TWO OF E.T.'S ART/POETRY JOURNALS by MAX GIMBLETT
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

DRAWINGS IN TWO COPIES OF MAX GIMBLETT MONOGRAPH by MAX GIMBLETT (2003)
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

EPHEMERA by MAX GIMBLETT
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

[FOURTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:


Haines Gallery in San Francisco announces a new exhibition for Max Gimblett. Here's their official announcement which mentions co-exhibitor James Turrell:

MAX GIMBLETT: All Things Wild and Innocent

JAMES TURRELL: Magnatron


3 March - 23 April, 2005

Opening Reception:
Thursday March 3rd, 2005
5:30 -7:30PM

Haines Gallery is pleased to announce a solo exhibition of new paintings by Max Gimblett: All Things Wild and Innocent. Gimblett's refined and harmonious canvases are created utilizing a process akin to alchemy. Employing a variety of materials from precious metals to polyurethane and expoxy resins, he continually challenges the nature of these materials through the process of creation.

Gimblett applies several coats of colored gesso to the surface of his works, which are sanded and then painted with layers of polyurethane and epoxy resins. The surface of these works are often gilded with precious metals and/or marked by expressive black painterly gestures inspired by the calligraphic arts. In an interview with scholar, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, the artist reflects on what inspires his process: "Layers of light bounce through the transparent polyurethane and epoxy. You can see everything through to the primary plane."

Following a highly successful first exhibition at Haines Gallery in 2003, world-renowned artist James Turrell returns to San Francisco with the light installation Magnatron. Magnatron is a simulacrum: an aperture, curved like a television screen, is placed in the wall; inside the wall, just below the aperture, sits a television set transmitting light. The resulting color fluctuation emitted into the space allows the viewer, like a moth drawn to a flame, to be only bathed in its endlessly changing glow. This enigmatic work bring to mid questions of complicity, complacency and comprehension while the viewer quietly confronts what is oftentimes an oppressive apparatus. Turrell's medium is light and preception his motif. In an interview with PBS's Art:21 series, the artist remarked, "I want to create an atmosphere that can be consciously plumbed with seeing, like the wordless thought that comes from looking in a fire."

***
Prov.: Direct from Artist

Saturday, February 12, 2005

"[] (FOAM, CONTACT PAPER, SHADOW BOX-TYPE FRAME)" by STEPHANIE SYJUCO
Location: Babaylan Lodge

[FOURTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:


Stephanie Syjuco is included in two ongoing group exhibitions: BOTANY 12 at Sonoma County Museum of Art through February 13, 2005, and PERSONAL MYTHOLOGIES at the Contemporary Museum Honolulu through March 13, 2005.

Here is the Contemporary Museum Honolulu's announcement:

Personal Mythologies: Earlier, Recent and Future Acquisitions
on view from January 21 - March 13


Personal Mythologies presents works from the collection of The Contemporary Museum that have never, or rarely, been shown publicly in Honolulu, and which complement the presentation of The Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation Gift. The exhibition includes painting, photography, sculpture, and installation, bringing together a selection of contemporary artists and their forbears who function within the long shadow cast by the legacy of Joseph Cornell. Works in the exhibition transport us to fictional realms where dreams and fantasies come alive and where idiosyncratic narratives present us with mysterious situations and near-mythical beings. From 1960 to the present, works by John Ahearn, Joseph Biel, Enrique Martínez Celaya, Douglas Gordon, Trenton Doyle Hancock, Teun Hocks, Eiko Hosoe, José Bedia, Aya Kawaguchi, Joseph Kosuth, Tom Marioni, Yasumasa Morimura, Frank Moore, Nic Nicosia, Catherine Opie, Dennis Oppenheim, Gary Simmons, Stephanie Syjuco, and Jeff Wall reveal different approaches to the use of imagery, text, and subject matter as a means of moving from day-to-day reality to parallel realms situated within the artistic imagination.

Cornell's flair for invention and improvisation with commonplace materials and objects is called to mind by Marioni's glass fronted box containing a personnage created with found objects, while Biel and Moore summon the imagination of Cornell with their fanciful dreamlike imagery. Cornell's attraction to dolls and other toys (including plastic lobsters) is evoked by a mechanized, dancing marionette by Oppenheim as well his large installation of oversized aloha shirts covered with fake lobsters and other plastic novelties. Syjuco's illustrations of electronic hardware-cum-botanical specimens recall Cornell's penchant for pseudo-scientific flights of imagination, while figurative works by José Bedia and Enrique Martínez Celaya suggest the mythological gods and goddesses that often populate Cornell's world. Opie's portrait of the performance artist Jerome Caja in drag, and Morimura's self-portrait as Marilyn Monroe, are reminders of Cornell's many tributes to glamorous film goddesses, while Gordon's double self-portrait reveals a dark, mythic presence lurking beneath the surface of the skin. Eiko Hosoe's photograph from his Man and Woman series recall Cornell's obsession with the classical ballet and works by Ahearn, Hancock, Hocks, Nicosia, and Wall summon Cornell through the construction of personal, impenetrable narratives and explorations of secret desires and compulsions. Kawaguchi, Kosuth and Simmons take a more reflective, poetic approach to explore the indistinct recesses between the visible and unseen, the physical and metaphysical, and imagination and reality. Kawaguchi, a young Japanese artist who is based in Honolulu, investigates the relationship between the "seen" and the "scene" in her observation of nature and its vicissitudes. Her site specific installation created especially for Personal Mythologies plays off of the square window panes that look out onto the museum's Lawrence Newbold Brown Japanese garden. In nine reverse-glass paintings installed across from corresponding panes, Kawaguchi frames meticulously observed aspects of the garden revealing the very personal, subjective choices we all make in the act of looking. Echoing Cornell's ability to construct miniature worlds behind glass-fronted boxes, Kawaguchi's installation presents a fictional world drawn from the overlooked aspects of everyday life.

***
Prov.: New Langton Arts, San Francisco

"MOONLIGHT" (1999) (WATERBASED MIXED MEDIA ON WOOD, 24 X 24 IN) by RICHARD TSAO
Location: Atop Turret Steps, Pygmalion-Second Floor

[THIRD MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:


Richard Tsao has a new exhibition! Here are details from the gallery:

Chambers Fine Art wishes you a Happy New Year of the Rooster!

Christophe W. Mao cordially invites you to a private viewing and reception for

Flood: Paintings by Richard Tsao

Thursday February 24th, 2005 from 6 – 8 pm
Artist will be present

We are pleased to announce the opening on February 24th of Flood, featuring paintings by Richard Tsao. This will be the artist's first solo exhibition at Chambers Fine Art. For the group exhibition Inverse Mirror held in November 2003, Tsao introduced a series of thick canvases saturated with color. The unique appearance of his work is the result of a long and elaborate process. Like the orchid growers of his native Thailand , he develops and nurtures his method-oriented abstractions until they come into full bloom. Beautiful to behold, Tsao's transcendental canvases slowly reveal their nuances and reflect the inner light of the creator and elicit a wide variety of responses in the attentive viewer.

In his introduction to the catalogue, Benjamin Genocchio gives a vivid description of Tsao's studio in Brooklyn , a paint-flooded basement densely hung with paintings in various stages of execution. “Confident enough to let chance do a little of the work for him, he uses a unique immersion-sedimentation technique enabling deposits of paint dye mixed with marble dust and matte medium (as a binder) to build up and mould the surface of his paintings. It's much like a chemical process, the artist soaking his paintings into the watery floor bath, hanging them on the wall to dry, then pressing, scraping and re-dipping them to bring the surface to completion.” Flooding, so much a part of the cycle of seasons in South East Asia , seems with hindsight a natural inspiration for the artist: no doubt the idea for his flooded studio floor springs at least in part from his childhood.

Born and raised in Thailand to Chinese parents, Tsao has lived and worked in New York since 1972. Thus although the encrusted surfaces and vivid colors of his abstractions, mostly quite small in scale, may evoke aspects of life in Bangkok as it was before globalization took over, he is keenly aware of the rich history of abstract art in the twentieth century. At a time when the majority of younger artists are looking in other directions, Tsao continues to develop his unique working method which results in the rugged yet refined abstractions that constitute the present exhibition, Flood.

CATALOGUE AVAILABLE WITH ESSAY BY BENJAMIN GENOCCHIO

CHAMBERS FINE ART
210 Eleventh Avenue, 4th Floor (corner of 25th Street)
New York, NY 10001
(212) 414-1169
www.chambersfineart.com

***
Prov.: Margaret Thatcher Projects, New York

Wednesday, February 09, 2005

MAC MCGINNES POSTER by ELIZABETH MURRAY
Location: TBD

I got this during the auction benefiting the wonderful literary organization Small Press Traffic. Here is is the Benefit Auction description for the work:

MAC MCGINNES POSTER: A poster of a play directed by Mac McGinnes. This was the 1970s Poets Theater production of "Four Plays by Edwin Denby" (at St. Marks Poetry Project, New York) directed by Bob Holman, with sets by Elizabeth Murray, and the poster is designed (and signed) by Murray. It is framed in glass.

***
Prov.: Kevin Killian and Small Press Traffic, San Francisco



Monday, February 07, 2005

"[]" by DULCIE DEE (WATERCOLOR AND MIXED MEDIA)
Location: Red Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

[THIRD MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

You can still catch Dulcie Dee's exhibition, "Collages," at the Philippine Center (556 Fifth Avenue and 46th Street, New York City) through February 11, 2005. This is Dee's first exhibit at the Center in ten years, following her return from residing in the Bay Area while she attended the Academy of Art in San Francisco.

***
Prov.: Direct from Artist



Friday, February 04, 2005

"HORN OF PLENTY" (1999) (OIL ON CANVAS, 18 X 22 IN) by CHESTER ARNOLD
Location: Hallway Outside Dining Room, Pygmalion-First Floor

[SECOND MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:


Chester Arnold was the subject of an article in today's San Francisco Chronicle over this exhibit which he instigated:

"To Never Forget: Faces of the Fallen"
visually portrays the scope of loss in the rows of portraits painted, illustrated, and drawn by students at College of Marin.

January 18 through February 22, 2005

Monday - Friday 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Saturday, Sunday 10:00 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Art Gallery, Fine Arts Building
College of Marin
835 College Avenue
Kentfield, CA 94904

For more information about this exhibit, click on this link or please call 415-485-9494.
From the exhibit's site:

What started as a local art project is bringing tearful responses from across America. In College of Marin’s new “To Never Forget: Faces of the Fallen” exhibit, art students and faculty have painted portraits of each American soldier who has died in Iraq –- more than 1200 –- each a 5x7 face staring straight into the eyes of the viewer.

“Faces” has tapped into a river of emotion in towns and communities across America, many of which have brothers, sisters, mothers, fathers, neighbors and friends in Iraq. More than 100 news outlets have profiled the exhibit, including ABC-TV national news and The Washington Post, The Boston Globe, and New York Newsday. Now, every day the college receives heart-felt responses from family, friends and others around the country needing a chance to remember and reflect on our losses. Some request portraits of their fallen relatives. Others ask that the exhibit tour the country, or be posted online. Visitors have come from as far away as Tennessee to see the faces of their loved ones.

College of Marin art instructor Chester Arnold created the project after reading a newspaper story when the U.S. death toll in Iraq reached 1,000. He did not anticipate completing all of the portraits -- but the project proved so emotionally-compelling for the artists that they couldn't rest until they had painted them all. "Perhaps ‘Faces’ can change the political debate,” said art instructor Chester Arnold. “Instead of ‘red states vs. blue states,’ I hope that we can find common ground as we did after September 11th.”

As the war continues, so do the artists.


***
Prov.: George Adams Gallery, New York



"AGENTS" (1996) (INK, GRAPHITE AND GEL MEDIUM ON CLEAR MYLAR, 17 x 11 IN) by SHARON LOUDEN
Location: Dining Room, Pygmalion-First Floor

"AGENTS" (1996) (INK, GRAPHITE AND GEL MEDIUM ON CLEAR MYLAR, 17 x 11 IN) by SHARON LOUDEN
Location: Dining Room, Pygmalion-First Floor

[SIXTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:


Sharon Louden's exhibit at Numark Gallery in Washington D.C. has received the following reviews:

Washington Post:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A59199-2005Feb2.html

Washington City Paper:
http://secure.washingtoncitypaper.com/cgi-bin/Archive/abridged2.bat?path=q:\DocRoot/2005/050128/BRUSHES&search=Sharon%20Louden&SearchString=Sharon+Louden&AuthorLastName=&IssueDate=mm%2Fdd%2Fyyyy&SelectYear=All&next.x=94&next.y=23

You can catch the exhibit through February 19, 2005!

"The Motley Tails"
Numark Gallery
625-27 E Street NW
Washington, DC 20004-2204
(202) 628-3810 telephone
numarkgall@aol.com
www.numarkgallery.com

Check out the review links as they present illustrations, though I'll reprint the text below from The Washington Post:

A Tailored Garden in Full Flower at Numark
By Jessica Dawson
Special to The Washington Post
Thursday, February 3, 2005; Page C05


There's one question that leaps to mind upon seeing "The Motley Tails," Sharon Louden's quirky extravagance of an installation at Numark: Exactly how many My Little Ponies died for this?

Turns out the stuff of Louden's exhibition wasn't shorn from Hasbro's horse figurines, though the resemblance is awfully strong. To make her room-size work, New York-based Louden collected hundreds of thousands of feet of microfilament fishing line in all manner of Easter egg colors. Long faux tresses in varied degrees of curl, bounce and gloss are fastened into ponytail-like bundles, some as long as your body, and suspended from the ceiling at varying heights. Since they're grouped in random clumps, here a dense patch of tails, there farther apart, visitors can wander around, under and beside them, brushing past their plastic tentacles. "The Motley Tails" could almost pass for a room-size playpen.

Yet as I meandered, ducked, and shimmied past the hanging tails, the idea of a three-dimensional interactive landscape came to mind. Since most of the plastic knots skim the floor, they appear to grow up like trees; Louden's palette, heavy on greens and yellows, furthers the conceit. "The Motley Tails" could be a picturesque garden brought indoors for the winter.

Back in the 18th century, Britain's upper classes went gaga for a new kind of garden. Popular landscape architects such as William Kent snubbed their noses at French-style horticultural symmetry -- the kind of ordered plantings you see at Versailles. Rather than master nature with applied rationality, Kent and company replicated nature's inconsistencies and even one-upped her wildness: They calculated to appear uncalculated.

Just as a stroll became an idyll in the transformed 18th-century garden, so the winter-chilled urbanite can indulge in Louden's fantasy space. Visitors may enjoy her piece from within or admire it from a distance. The long view is my favorite: Taking in the room as a panorama reveals thematic surprises. A violent strand of red runs through a rear tail, as if murder were one of many intrigues woven into this make-believe world.

When Kent drew up his garden plans, he based them not on the parks he visited throughout Europe, as one might expect. Instead, he drew on the artist's idealized version of nature: the landscape painting. He brought the great landscapes of the baroque -- painted by Claude Lorrain, Nicolas Poussin and others -- into three dimensions. His choice of shrubs in varying hues mimicked painterly effects of light and shadow.

Louden does much the same thing. She interweaves variously colored strands to create highlights and lowlights that lend her tails depth and dimension. Likewise, her foundation is painting -- her own.

A handful of wood panel works from the series "The Lingering," also on view here, depict short, sinewy gestures that are the source forms for her installation. "The Motley Tails" picks out those markings and extends them into sinuous lines of microfilament. Like a picturesque garden, the work has a light touch and a conceptually rich underpinning.

Numark's project room, adjacent to Louden's installation, features four wall sculptures by Las Vegas-based artist David Ryan. The pieces occupy a conceptual middle ground between sculpture and painting, formality and expressionism. Each is made from three layers of medium-density fiberboard panels (the cheap but efficient stuff of Ikea bookshelves) cut into irregularly edged cartoon strip balloon-like ovals and laid on top of each other like slices of bologna. My description sounds more complicated than they look. Most cut a sleek, flirtatious silhouette. Snatches of bright color peek out from the edges of their predominantly white surfaces.
The objects may be expressive in form but not in manufacture. Ryan's shapes are laser-cut by equipment programmed to follow the artist's designs, then they're sanded to a machine-tooled smoothness and painted with acrylics. Close in spirit to industrial objects, their lack of apparent human touch would please a diehard minimalist.

Despite their clean lines and surfaces, though, the pictures insist on their own rounded and goopy forms. Their voluptuous curves and low relief remind me of the blobby thick paintings on Plexiglas that District artist Maggie Michael used to make. Their intrigue comes out of the push-pull between clinical production and seductive form.

***
Prov.: Haines Gallery, San Francisco



Thursday, February 03, 2005

DUE TO BLOGGER PROBLEM, ARCHIVES AS OF THIS DATE AND OLDER ARE PRESENTED NON-FORMATTED:

Friday, February 04, 2005
"AGENTS" (1996) (INK, GRAPHITE AND GEL MEDIUM ON CLEAR MYLAR, 17 x 11 IN) by SHARON LOUDEN
Location: Dining Room, Pygmalion-First Floor

"AGENTS" (1996) (INK, GRAPHITE AND GEL MEDIUM ON CLEAR MYLAR, 17 x 11 IN) by SHARON LOUDEN
Location: Dining Room, Pygmalion-First Floor

[SIXTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:

Sharon Louden's exhibit at Numark Gallery in Washington D.C. has received the following reviews:

Washington Post:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A59199-2005Feb2.html

Washington City Paper:
http://secure.washingtoncitypaper.com/cgi-bin/Archive/abridged2.bat?path=q:\DocRoot/2005/050128/BRUSHES&search=Sharon%20Louden&SearchString=Sharon+Louden&AuthorLastName=&IssueDate=mm%2Fdd%2Fyyyy&SelectYear=All&next.x=94&next.y=23

You can catch the exhibit through February 19, 2005!

"The Motley Tails"
Numark Gallery
625-27 E Street NW
Washington, DC 20004-2204
(202) 628-3810 telephone
numarkgall@aol.com
www.numarkgallery.com

Check out the review links as they present illustrations, though I'll reprint the text below from The Washington Post:

A Tailored Garden in Full Flower at Numark
By Jessica Dawson
Special to The Washington Post
Thursday, February 3, 2005; Page C05

There's one question that leaps to mind upon seeing "The Motley Tails," Sharon Louden's quirky extravagance of an installation at Numark: Exactly how many My Little Ponies died for this?

Turns out the stuff of Louden's exhibition wasn't shorn from Hasbro's horse figurines, though the resemblance is awfully strong. To make her room-size work, New York-based Louden collected hundreds of thousands of feet of microfilament fishing line in all manner of Easter egg colors. Long faux tresses in varied degrees of curl, bounce and gloss are fastened into ponytail-like bundles, some as long as your body, and suspended from the ceiling at varying heights. Since they're grouped in random clumps, here a dense patch of tails, there farther apart, visitors can wander around, under and beside them, brushing past their plastic tentacles. "The Motley Tails" could almost pass for a room-size playpen.

Yet as I meandered, ducked, and shimmied past the hanging tails, the idea of a three-dimensional interactive landscape came to mind. Since most of the plastic knots skim the floor, they appear to grow up like trees; Louden's palette, heavy on greens and yellows, furthers the conceit. "The Motley Tails" could be a picturesque garden brought indoors for the winter.

Back in the 18th century, Britain's upper classes went gaga for a new kind of garden. Popular landscape architects such as William Kent snubbed their noses at French-style horticultural symmetry -- the kind of ordered plantings you see at Versailles. Rather than master nature with applied rationality, Kent and company replicated nature's inconsistencies and even one-upped her wildness: They calculated to appear uncalculated.

Just as a stroll became an idyll in the transformed 18th-century garden, so the winter-chilled urbanite can indulge in Louden's fantasy space. Visitors may enjoy her piece from within or admire it from a distance. The long view is my favorite: Taking in the room as a panorama reveals thematic surprises. A violent strand of red runs through a rear tail, as if murder were one of many intrigues woven into this make-believe world.

When Kent drew up his garden plans, he based them not on the parks he visited throughout Europe, as one might expect. Instead, he drew on the artist's idealized version of nature: the landscape painting. He brought the great landscapes of the baroque -- painted by Claude Lorrain, Nicolas Poussin and others -- into three dimensions. His choice of shrubs in varying hues mimicked painterly effects of light and shadow.

Louden does much the same thing. She interweaves variously colored strands to create highlights and lowlights that lend her tails depth and dimension. Likewise, her foundation is painting -- her own.

A handful of wood panel works from the series "The Lingering," also on view here, depict short, sinewy gestures that are the source forms for her installation. "The Motley Tails" picks out those markings and extends them into sinuous lines of microfilament. Like a picturesque garden, the work has a light touch and a conceptually rich underpinning.

Numark's project room, adjacent to Louden's installation, features four wall sculptures by Las Vegas-based artist David Ryan. The pieces occupy a conceptual middle ground between sculpture and painting, formality and expressionism. Each is made from three layers of medium-density fiberboard panels (the cheap but efficient stuff of Ikea bookshelves) cut into irregularly edged cartoon strip balloon-like ovals and laid on top of each other like slices of bologna. My description sounds more complicated than they look. Most cut a sleek, flirtatious silhouette. Snatches of bright color peek out from the edges of their predominantly white surfaces.
The objects may be expressive in form but not in manufacture. Ryan's shapes are laser-cut by equipment programmed to follow the artist's designs, then they're sanded to a machine-tooled smoothness and painted with acrylics. Close in spirit to industrial objects, their lack of apparent human touch would please a diehard minimalist.

Despite their clean lines and surfaces, though, the pictures insist on their own rounded and goopy forms. Their voluptuous curves and low relief remind me of the blobby thick paintings on Plexiglas that District artist Maggie Michael used to make. Their intrigue comes out of the push-pull between clinical production and seductive form.

***
Prov.: Haines Gallery, San Francisco

# posted by EILEEN @ 8:44 AM


Friday, February 04, 2005
"HORN OF PLENTY" (1999) (OIL ON CANVAS, 18 X 22 IN) by CHESTER ARNOLD
Location: Hallway Outside Dining Room, Pygmalion-First Floor

[SECOND MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:

Chester Arnold was the subject of an article in today's San Francisco Chronicle over this exhibit which he instigated:

"To Never Forget: Faces of the Fallen"
visually portrays the scope of loss in the rows of portraits painted, illustrated, and drawn by students at College of Marin.

January 18 through February 22, 2005

Monday - Friday 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Saturday, Sunday 10:00 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Art Gallery, Fine Arts Building
College of Marin
835 College Avenue
Kentfield, CA 94904

For more information about this exhibit, click on this link or please call 415-485-9494. From the exhibit's site:

What started as a local art project is bringing tearful responses from across America. In College of Marin’s new “To Never Forget: Faces of the Fallen” exhibit, art students and faculty have painted portraits of each American soldier who has died in Iraq –- more than 1200 –- each a 5x7 face staring straight into the eyes of the viewer.

“Faces” has tapped into a river of emotion in towns and communities across America, many of which have brothers, sisters, mothers, fathers, neighbors and friends in Iraq. More than 100 news outlets have profiled the exhibit, including ABC-TV national news and The Washington Post, The Boston Globe, and New York Newsday. Now, every day the college receives heart-felt responses from family, friends and others around the country needing a chance to remember and reflect on our losses. Some request portraits of their fallen relatives. Others ask that the exhibit tour the country, or be posted online. Visitors have come from as far away as Tennessee to see the faces of their loved ones.

College of Marin art instructor Chester Arnold created the project after reading a newspaper story when the U.S. death toll in Iraq reached 1,000. He did not anticipate completing all of the portraits -- but the project proved so emotionally-compelling for the artists that they couldn't rest until they had painted them all. "Perhaps ‘Faces’ can change the political debate,” said art instructor Chester Arnold. “Instead of ‘red states vs. blue states,’ I hope that we can find common ground as we did after September 11th.”

As the war continues, so do the artists.

***
Prov.: George Adams Gallery, New York
# posted by EILEEN @ 10:45 PM

Monday, February 07, 2005
"[]" by DULCIE DEE (WATERCOLOR AND MIXED MEDIA)
Location: Red Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

[THIRD MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

You can still catch Dulcie Dee's exhibition, "Collages," at the Philippine Center (556 Fifth Avenue and 46th Street, New York City) through February 11, 2005. This is Dee's first exhibit at the Center in ten years, following her return from residing in the Bay Area while she attended the Academy of Art in San Francisco.

***
Prov.: Direct from Artist

# posted by EILEEN @ 10:49 PM

Wednesday, February 09, 2005
MAC MCGINNES POSTER by ELIZABETH MURRAY
Location: TBD

I got this during the auction benefiting the wonderful literary organization Small Press Traffic. Here is is the Benefit Auction description for the work:

MAC MCGINNES POSTER: A poster of a play directed by Mac McGinnes. This was the 1970s Poets Theater production of "Four Plays by Edwin Denby" (at St. Marks Poetry Project, New York) directed by Bob Holman, with sets by Elizabeth Murray, and the poster is designed (and signed) by Murray. It is framed in glass.

***
Prov.: Kevin Killian and Small Press Traffic, San Francisco

# posted by EILEEN @ 9:58 PM


Saturday, February 12, 2005
"MOONLIGHT" (1999) (WATERBASED MIXED MEDIA ON WOOD, 24 X 24 IN) by RICHARD TSAO
Location: Atop Turret Steps, Pygmalion-Second Floor

[THIRD MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:

Richard Tsao has a new exhibition! Here are details from the gallery:

Chambers Fine Art wishes you a Happy New Year of the Rooster!

Christophe W. Mao cordially invites you to a private viewing and reception for

Flood: Paintings by Richard Tsao

Thursday February 24th, 2005 from 6 – 8 pm
Artist will be present

We are pleased to announce the opening on February 24th of Flood, featuring paintings by Richard Tsao. This will be the artist's first solo exhibition at Chambers Fine Art. For the group exhibition Inverse Mirror held in November 2003, Tsao introduced a series of thick canvases saturated with color. The unique appearance of his work is the result of a long and elaborate process. Like the orchid growers of his native Thailand , he develops and nurtures his method-oriented abstractions until they come into full bloom. Beautiful to behold, Tsao's transcendental canvases slowly reveal their nuances and reflect the inner light of the creator and elicit a wide variety of responses in the attentive viewer.

In his introduction to the catalogue, Benjamin Genocchio gives a vivid description of Tsao's studio in Brooklyn , a paint-flooded basement densely hung with paintings in various stages of execution. “Confident enough to let chance do a little of the work for him, he uses a unique immersion-sedimentation technique enabling deposits of paint dye mixed with marble dust and matte medium (as a binder) to build up and mould the surface of his paintings. It's much like a chemical process, the artist soaking his paintings into the watery floor bath, hanging them on the wall to dry, then pressing, scraping and re-dipping them to bring the surface to completion.” Flooding, so much a part of the cycle of seasons in South East Asia , seems with hindsight a natural inspiration for the artist: no doubt the idea for his flooded studio floor springs at least in part from his childhood.

Born and raised in Thailand to Chinese parents, Tsao has lived and worked in New York since 1972. Thus although the encrusted surfaces and vivid colors of his abstractions, mostly quite small in scale, may evoke aspects of life in Bangkok as it was before globalization took over, he is keenly aware of the rich history of abstract art in the twentieth century. At a time when the majority of younger artists are looking in other directions, Tsao continues to develop his unique working method which results in the rugged yet refined abstractions that constitute the present exhibition, Flood.

CATALOGUE AVAILABLE WITH ESSAY BY BENJAMIN GENOCCHIO

CHAMBERS FINE ART
210 Eleventh Avenue, 4th Floor (corner of 25th Street)
New York, NY 10001
(212) 414-1169
www.chambersfineart.com

***
Prov.: Margaret Thatcher Projects, New York
# posted by EILEEN @ 8:57 AM


Saturday, February 12, 2005
"[] (FOAM, CONTACT PAPER, SHADOW BOX-TYPE FRAME)" by STEPHANIE SYJUCO
Location: Babaylan Lodge

[FOURTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:

Stephanie Syjuco is included in two ongoing group exhibitions: BOTANY 12 at Sonoma County Museum of Art through February 13, 2005, and PERSONAL MYTHOLOGIES at the Contemporary Museum Honolulu through March 13, 2005.

Here is the Contemporary Museum Honolulu's announcement:

Personal Mythologies: Earlier, Recent and Future Acquisitions
on view from January 21 - March 13

Personal Mythologies presents works from the collection of The Contemporary Museum that have never, or rarely, been shown publicly in Honolulu, and which complement the presentation of The Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation Gift. The exhibition includes painting, photography, sculpture, and installation, bringing together a selection of contemporary artists and their forbears who function within the long shadow cast by the legacy of Joseph Cornell. Works in the exhibition transport us to fictional realms where dreams and fantasies come alive and where idiosyncratic narratives present us with mysterious situations and near-mythical beings. From 1960 to the present, works by John Ahearn, Joseph Biel, Enrique Martínez Celaya, Douglas Gordon, Trenton Doyle Hancock, Teun Hocks, Eiko Hosoe, José Bedia, Aya Kawaguchi, Joseph Kosuth, Tom Marioni, Yasumasa Morimura, Frank Moore, Nic Nicosia, Catherine Opie, Dennis Oppenheim, Gary Simmons, Stephanie Syjuco, and Jeff Wall reveal different approaches to the use of imagery, text, and subject matter as a means of moving from day-to-day reality to parallel realms situated within the artistic imagination.

Cornell's flair for invention and improvisation with commonplace materials and objects is called to mind by Marioni's glass fronted box containing a personnage created with found objects, while Biel and Moore summon the imagination of Cornell with their fanciful dreamlike imagery. Cornell's attraction to dolls and other toys (including plastic lobsters) is evoked by a mechanized, dancing marionette by Oppenheim as well his large installation of oversized aloha shirts covered with fake lobsters and other plastic novelties. Syjuco's illustrations of electronic hardware-cum-botanical specimens recall Cornell's penchant for pseudo-scientific flights of imagination, while figurative works by José Bedia and Enrique Martínez Celaya suggest the mythological gods and goddesses that often populate Cornell's world. Opie's portrait of the performance artist Jerome Caja in drag, and Morimura's self-portrait as Marilyn Monroe, are reminders of Cornell's many tributes to glamorous film goddesses, while Gordon's double self-portrait reveals a dark, mythic presence lurking beneath the surface of the skin. Eiko Hosoe's photograph from his Man and Woman series recall Cornell's obsession with the classical ballet and works by Ahearn, Hancock, Hocks, Nicosia, and Wall summon Cornell through the construction of personal, impenetrable narratives and explorations of secret desires and compulsions. Kawaguchi, Kosuth and Simmons take a more reflective, poetic approach to explore the indistinct recesses between the visible and unseen, the physical and metaphysical, and imagination and reality. Kawaguchi, a young Japanese artist who is based in Honolulu, investigates the relationship between the "seen" and the "scene" in her observation of nature and its vicissitudes. Her site specific installation created especially for Personal Mythologies plays off of the square window panes that look out onto the museum's Lawrence Newbold Brown Japanese garden. In nine reverse-glass paintings installed across from corresponding panes, Kawaguchi frames meticulously observed aspects of the garden revealing the very personal, subjective choices we all make in the act of looking. Echoing Cornell's ability to construct miniature worlds behind glass-fronted boxes, Kawaguchi's installation presents a fictional world drawn from the overlooked aspects of everyday life.

***
Prov.: New Langton Arts, San Francisco
# posted by EILEEN @ 5:59 PM

Friday, February 18, 2005
"ENSO" (DRAWING ON FOUR PIECES OF HANDMADE PAPER) by MAX GIMBLETT
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"UNTITLED" (COLLABORATIVE DRAWING ON BUTCHER PAPER BETWEEN MAX GIMBLETT, E.T., T.P. AND NOMI) (2001)
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"[]" (2003) (PRINT, 15/25) by MAX GIMBLETT
Location: Yellow Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

"UNTITLED" (SUMI INK DRAWING AGAINST ASIA SOCIETY PROGRAMS) (2001) by MAX GIMBLETT
Location: Babaylan Lodge

POETRY/ART BROADSIDE by MAX GIMBLETT AND E.T.
Location: Babaylan Lodge

"DOUBLE HEADED CREATURE FEATURE" (ARTISTS' BOOK, 17.5 X 7 X 0.5 IN) by MAX GIMBLETT AND JOHN YAU WITH TOBY HINES
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

DRAWINGS IN TWO OF E.T.'S ART/POETRY JOURNALS by MAX GIMBLETT
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

DRAWINGS IN TWO COPIES OF MAX GIMBLETT MONOGRAPH by MAX GIMBLETT (2003)
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

EPHEMERA by MAX GIMBLETT
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

[FOURTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:

Haines Gallery in San Francisco announces a new exhibition for Max Gimblett. Here's their official announcement which mentions co-exhibitor James Turrell:

MAX GIMBLETT: All Things Wild and Innocent

JAMES TURRELL: Magnatron

3 March - 23 April, 2005

Opening Reception:
Thursday March 3rd, 2005
5:30 -7:30PM

Haines Gallery is pleased to announce a solo exhibition of new paintings by Max Gimblett: All Things Wild and Innocent. Gimblett's refined and harmonious canvases are created utilizing a process akin to alchemy. Employing a variety of materials from precious metals to polyurethane and expoxy resins, he continually challenges the nature of these materials through the process of creation.

Gimblett applies several coats of colored gesso to the surface of his works, which are sanded and then painted with layers of polyurethane and epoxy resins. The surface of these works are often gilded with precious metals and/or marked by expressive black painterly gestures inspired by the calligraphic arts. In an interview with scholar, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, the artist reflects on what inspires his process: "Layers of light bounce through the transparent polyurethane and epoxy. You can see everything through to the primary plane."

Following a highly successful first exhibition at Haines Gallery in 2003, world-renowned artist James Turrell returns to San Francisco with the light installation Magnatron. Magnatron is a simulacrum: an aperture, curved like a television screen, is placed in the wall; inside the wall, just below the aperture, sits a television set transmitting light. The resulting color fluctuation emitted into the space allows the viewer, like a moth drawn to a flame, to be only bathed in its endlessly changing glow. This enigmatic work bring to mid questions of complicity, complacency and comprehension while the viewer quietly confronts what is oftentimes an oppressive apparatus. Turrell's medium is light and preception his motif. In an interview with PBS's Art:21 series, the artist remarked, "I want to create an atmosphere that can be consciously plumbed with seeing, like the wordless thought that comes from looking in a fire."

***
Prov.: Direct from Artist
# posted by EILEEN @ 12:21 PM


Sunday, February 20, 2005
"BANNED IN PORT JEFFERSON" (2004) (5 X 7 IN) PAINTING by THOMAS FINK
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"GOSSIP VI" (2003) (10 x 8 IN) PAINTING by THOMAS FINK
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"DEAR ONE" (2002) PAINTING by THOMAS FINK
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"DOES THE MOON BLEED" (2002) PAINTING by THOMAS FINK
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"HAY(NA)KU 1" (2005) PAINTING by THOMAS FINK
Location: Blue Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

[FOURTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

Galatea adds a fifth painting, "Hay(na)ku 1" to its collection, courtesy of poet-painter Thomas Fink who painted a lovely abstract work with his trademark biomorphic/outer-space references.

The title relates to the poetic form I concocted, the hay(na)ku which are tercets where the first line is one word, the second line is comprised of two words, and the third line consists of three words. Thus, the biomorphic forms includes three sets of three blue lines, relating to the tercets that comprise the hay(na)ku. There's no particular consistency in the lengths of the blue lines since the words that comprise the hay(na)ku, too, have no constraints as regards length of words.

The blue forms are set against a backdrop of the colors red, white, and yellow which, together with blue, comprise the colors of both the U.S. and Philippine flags. The color diction, if you will, is apropos of how I characterize the hay(na)ku as a Filipino "diasporic" form. There are also spherical forms within the blue lines -- again befitting how the spheres can be planets, in turn referencing diaspora.

There's also a scribbling -- as in writing -- pattern in the background, befitting how one writes poems such as the hay(na)ku. As the scribbles occur, gold is the color uncovered, which is apt for how gold is the Buddhist color for enlightenment (how synchronistic that Tom is Buddhist).

Though the above were my thoughts in looking at Tom's work, Tom's answer to my response about his thought process shows I wasn't that far off the mark. He writes:

Dear Eileen,
I'm so glad you like "Hay(na)ku 1" and that you can easily identify the painting as relating to your wonderful poetic form. Since finishing your canvas, I finished #2 (20" x 16") and I expect in the next 6-8 months, I'll do 7-8 more at that larger scale (and maybe 1 even larger one).

Re the thought process of the "Hay(na)ku" series, for 2 or 3 months, I did a lot of drawings that didn't work, perhaps because 1) I didn't know how many gatherings of 3 shapes with the hay(na)ku-istic progressive elongation--1, 2, or 3-- would make for a good, dynamic composition; 2) when I realized that 3 x 3 "lines" would be best, I didn't figure out which should be coming out of a side of the canvas and which floating within the field; 3) I didn't sense which 3 corners should anchor the compositiom and which 1 should not be used; 4) the 3 groupings of 3 were not interacting well with each other compositionally; 5) some of the shapes of the "lines" were clunky; 6) the synergy of some of the first 5 points was, of course, negative. Once I had a decent drawing, it was evident that the colors of the painting should have some relation to the flag of the native land of the inventor of the poetic form.

Thank
you for
your strong encouragement,
Tom

THANK YOU, Tom!

***
Prov.: Direct from Artist
# posted by EILEEN @ 4:26 PM

Tuesday, February 22, 2005
"SAFE IN MY ARMS (10.5", MASVINGO SERPENTINE) by KIZITO RWANZA
Location: Library, Pygmalion-First Floor

This Shona sculpture was a present from Galatea's first Artist-in-Residence, and it perfectly embodies the notion of Galatea keeping artists safe within her arms. Delighted to have it at home!

***
Prov.: Spirits in Stone, St. Helena, CA (Number: 195166)
# posted by EILEEN @ 9:02 PM

Wednesday, February 23, 2005
"AMERICAN BLONDE" (1997) (ACRYLIC ON PANEL, 36 X 36 IN) by JAMES WESTWATER
Location: Master Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

"POMP" (1997) (ACRYLIC ON PANEL, 36 X 36 IN) by JAMES WESTWATER
Location: Master Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

"CAEDMON'S FIRST WORD" (1997) (ACRYLIC ON PANEL, 22 X 11 IN) by JAMES WESTWATER
Location: Master Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

"GRIFTER'S REWARD" (1997) (ACRYLIC ON PANEL, 11 X 11 IN) by JAMES WESTWATER
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"GARGLE" (1997) (ACRYLIC ON PANEL, 11 X 11 IN) by JAMES WESTWATER
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

THREE MATCHBOX PAINTINGS by JAMES WESTWATER
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

POSTCARD COLLAGE from JAMES WESTWATER
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

FOURTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE:

UPDATE:

UPDATE:
Congratulations to James Westwater whose retrospective -- looks fabulous! -- is now up at Rule Gallery in Denver! Here are details:

January 21 - March 5, 2005

James Westwater: 10 Years,
Geometric Narcissism, 1995 - 2005

Opening Reception:
Friday, January 21, 2005
6:00 - 9:00 pm

Here is the text from the gallery's official release:

JAMES WESTWATER

The term “Geometric Narcissism,” coined by Westwater, reveals the impetus behind his work. Narcissism generally implies a self-indulgent love of oneself, but also has connotations of a lack of empathy. Geometric Narcissism, or GeoNarc, is appropriate here since it is geometric oval or square shapes that serve as Westwater’s narcissistic stamp, or non-logo. This signature, placed over abstract compositions, appropriated images, and found objects, implies Westwater’s lack of empathy for these objects prior to his branding of them with the representation of himself. Through his narcissism, Westwater indulges his desire to make his mark, and in doing so, produces something greater than the source it came from. The results of Westwater’s indulgences of his ego are works with a minimal tone that at the same time carry the vast richness of history, walking a delicate line between impulse and reason.

From his studios in Santa Fe and Los Angeles, James Westwater’s work has traveled to exhibitions in Japan, London, Paris, New York and Los Angeles. Westwater’s works are held in numerous private and public collections, including Marcy and William Shatner in Los Angeles, Pélé in Brazil, Komar and Melamid in New York, and the Museum of Fine Arts in Santa Fe. Westwater’s recent work has been published in the new book 3-D Art/Techné.

***
Prov.: Linda Durham Gallery, Galisteo, N.M.
# posted by EILEEN @ 10:46 AM

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