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Friday, March 18, 2005

"AGENTS" (1996) (INK, GRAPHITE AND GEL MEDIUM ON CLEAR MYLAR, 17 x 11 IN) by SHARON LOUDEN
Location: Dining Room, Pygmalion-First Floor

"AGENTS" (1996) (INK, GRAPHITE AND GEL MEDIUM ON CLEAR MYLAR, 17 x 11 IN) by SHARON LOUDEN
Location: Dining Room, Pygmalion-First Floor

[SEVENTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:


Sharon Louden recently received a wonderful review of her painting exhibition at Anthony Grant by Jonathan Goodman in Art in America:

SHARON LOUDEN AT ANTHONY GRANT
By Jonathan Goodman


This show of Sharon Louden's paintings and sculptures demonstrated her propensity for the enigmatic gesture. Having graduated with a master's degree from Yale in 1991, Louden is better known for her drawings and sculpture, which have been exhibited extensively in the U.S., than for her paintings. The medium-size works in the series titled "The lingering" were all done in 2003-04 and created with watercolor, acrylic, and gel medium on wood panel. They consist of brushstroke-like forms that accumulate in one area of otherwise blank white panels. In each work, some of the marks are made only with outlines and others are filled in with washes. Although the press materials describe the shapes as "anthropomorphic," to this viewer they are suggestive of bacilli seen through the lens of a microscope. Whatever the origins of the imagery, an interesting tension exists in reading the marks as nature-based and as purely abstract--as explorations of form, tonal values, movement and over-all gestalt.

Within each painting, individual elements appear to drag themselves away from the pile-up, as if they were trying to escape. A particularly compelling grouping at the bottom left of one painting is done in a reddish sepia color. Some of the marks seem to be rising upward into the surrounding empty matter.

Louden also showed a series of sculptures, titled "Yellow Tails" (2004). The sculptures consist of groupings of lustrous white and yellow monofilament, about 3 feet or longer in length, hanging from the ceiling. Small clusters are held together by clips and joined in bunches. Several of these larger bunches are then hung close together, their brightly colored, light-catching ends resting on the floor. Like the "The Lingering" paintings, simple components are combined to create complex structures that suggest biological forms. They are as enigmatic as the paintings, provoking many interpretations, symbolic or allegorical. Both series in this show are small triumphs of material being.

*****
Prov.: Haines Gallery, San Francisco, CA

DUE TO BLOGGER PROBLEM, ARCHIVES AS OF THIS DATE AND OLDER ARE PRESENTED NON-FORMATTED:

Tuesday, March 08, 2005
"UNTITLED" (2002) (GOUACHE ON WOOD PANEL) by CLARE ROJAS
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"UNTITLED" (2003) COMMISSIONED SITE-SPECIFIC MURAL INSTALLATION (GOUCHE/LATEX ON WALL) by CLARE ROJAS
Location: Master Bedroom Hallway, Pygmalion-2nd Floor

"ACHILLES" (2005) COMMISSIONED PAINTING by CLARE ROJAS
Location: Living Room, Pygmalion-First Floor

[SIXTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:

Clare Rojas is part of a new group exhibition at Lizabeth Oliveria Gallery. Here's the gallery's press release:

Lizabeth Oliveria Gallery is delighted to present Art Part II: Dazzle Dogs, an exhibition by Clare Rojas, Erin Rosenthal and Andrew Jeffrey Wright, March 5th - April 9th. There will be a reception for the artists on Saturday, March 5th from 7-9pm with a musical performance by Peggy Honeywell.

Clare Rojas's recurring repertory of whimsical animals, beguiling figures, and dream-like landscapes initially seems to reference classic fairy and folk tales, popular culture, and western art. However, the closer one looks at her meticulously painted scenes, the more one discovers her own idiosyncratic iconography. Filled with archetypes that are both magical and malevolent, Rojas's work elicits different associations and meanings from each viewer.

Rojas was born in Columbus, Ohio. She received her BFA in Printmaking at the Rhode Island School of Design in 1998, and her MFA at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2002. Rojas has exhibited her work at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; The Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia; the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts; and The Luggage Store in San Francisco. Her recent exhibitions include solo exhibitions, Table Turner at Deitch Projects, New York and Will Poor Will at the Belkin Satellite at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. Currently her work is on view in the Beautiful Losers exhibition at the Orange County Museum of Art, CA. Rojas is the first recipient of the Headlands Center for the Arts Tournesol Award, and in 2003 Rojas also received the prestigious Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Award.

A reoccurring theme in Erin Rosenthal's work is invented and evolving personal mythology. Through a rediscovery of ancient memory and belief in peace, her characters and the worlds they inhabit reflect a synthesis of cultural beliefs. Rosenthal is repeatedly intrigued by the precarious dynamic between modern civilization and the natural world. She aims to create work that although narrative in content and form, allows the viewer space to free-associate and construct his/her own interpretation.

Erin Rosenthal was born in 1976 in Providence, R.I, and holds a B.A. in Film/Animation/Video from the Rhode Island School of Design. In 2000-2001, she received a Fulbright Scholarship for film study at the Academy of Fine Arts Krakow, Poland. Her work has been seen in Forest For Us, The Space at Alice, Providence, RI; Summer Printing Pool, Gallery Rocket, Tokyo, Japan; Paper Rodeo Traveling Show, The
Beguiling, Toronto, Ontario; and Space 1026 & Friends, Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia, PA.

Andrew Jeffrey Wright lives in Philadelphia, PA. where he is a co-founder of Space 1026, an art collective. Wright’s artwork ranges from painting, screen-printing and drawing to artists’ zines collaborating with a variety of artists. His work has been seen in numerous exhibitions including, Beaver College, Exhibition of Collectives: The Royal Art Lodge, Paper Rodeo; The Skull Show, Hanna, Tokyo, Japan; #20, w/Hisham Akira Bharoocha, Bjorn Copeland, Scott Wolniak, Champion Fine Art, Brooklyn, NY; Outerspace Hillbilly, w/Barry McGee, Leif Goldberg & Clare Rojas, Luggage Store, San Francisco, CA; Odd Fellows, w/Marcel Dzama & Michael Dumontier, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia, PA; and Headlands Center for the Arts, Project Space with Barry McGee, Devin Flynn, Dan Murphy, Isaac, Lin, Clare Rojas and Paper Rad, Sausalito, CA.

The Manipulators, his animated film made in collaboration with Clare Rojas, has received numerous awards, including Best Animation at the New York Underground Film Festival (2000). Wright received his B.F.A. from the University of the Arts, Philadelphia.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
lizabeth oliveria gallery
2712 s. la cienega blvd.
los angeles, ca 90034
(t) 310.837.1073
(f) 310.837.1740
web@lizabetholiveria.com

***
Prov.: Lizabeth Oliveira Gallery, Culver City, CA
# posted by EILEEN @ 7:08 PM


Wednesday, March 09, 2005
"[] (HAND, MAPPED OUT, PAINTED/DRAWN AGAINST HAND-MADE PAPER) by SANTIAGO BOSE
Location: Babaylan Lodge

[SEVENTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:

Pusod, Center for Ecology, Culture and Bayan (Berkeley, CA) presents a March 19, 2005 book launch and film premiere focused around the works of Santiago "Santi" Bose. Click here for more information. The book launch is for a monograph on Santi's work, ESPIRITU SANTI: The Strange Life and Even Stranger Legacy of Santiago Bose, which includes two of my art essays and several of my poems (further reprinted in my new book I TAKE THEE, ENGLISH, FOR MY BELOVED).

Also featured will be a film by Santi's daughter, Lilledeshan Bose:

"my break ups into a million pieces" (16 min) is about a young woman's migration to Southern California after the death of her father, famous painter Santiago Bose. Directed by amir motlagh and written by Lilledeshan Bose, this 16-minute film, shot in digital video and super 8, is an exploration of personal and spiritual identity, death, romantic relationships and the myth of Americana from a Filipino perspective. Co-produced by Motlagh and Bose, the film-essay is punctuated with original music written by Bose with various Orange County bands and features many artists (painter Reza PorMansor, producer Alex Xenophon) from the Santa Ana underground. With gorgeous shots of Los Angeles freeways and endless blue skies, "my break ups into a million pieces" marks the transition to new country and a new life: the rush of a brave, sunshiney new world.

WRITER'S BIOGRAPHY
Lilledeshan Bose is an award-winning writer and musician. Born and raised in the Philippines, she moved to America two years ago. She works as an editor at a daily newspaper in Riverside, Calif. Before she moved to America, she was the features editor of Seventeen Magazine Philippines. She also wrote a teen novel called "Una and Miguel"(Adarna House, 2002). Her works of essay, fiction and poetry have appeared in international anthologies and publications such as Philippine Daily Inquirer, Asiaweek, Cosmopolitan and FHM. Her works have been translated in four languages. She is a graduate of the University of the Philippines, Diliman, where she majored in creative writing. She misses her father dearly. www.lilledeshan.com

DIRECTOR'S BIOGRAPHY
Amir Motlagh's filmography as a writer/director includes the films "Dino Adino," "Lover @ 11:47" and "Still Lover." In 2004 he added to his output, finishing two beautifully crafted documentaries titled "Pumkin Little" and "my break ups into a million pieces" both set for release in 2005. The first three films have played in over 30 festivals and film-related shows, winning five awards including an "Audience Award" at DancesWithFilms 2003, "Best of the Fest" YardFest 2003, "Outstanding Lead Actor" WestFest 2003 and two "Audience Awards" at Friday Night Shorts. His film "Still Lover" was also named, "Top Ten Atom Films of 2004" and is going on an 18-city world tour in 2005. In 2005 Motlagh also released a lo-fi 6 part video series titled, "Lessons in Self-Destruction." Motlagh is also a trained actor and holds a BA degree in Psychology from UCLA. He seeks smart producers to work on two feature films that will define a new genre.

Here are event details:

SATURDAY, MARCH 19
8-10PM
Pusod
1808 5th St.
Berkeley, CA, USA 94710
For info, call: (510) 883-1808

***
Prov.: Direct from Artist
# posted by EILEEN @ 2:30 PM

Thursday, March 17, 2005
"UNTITLED" (2002) (GOUACHE ON WOOD PANEL) by CLARE ROJAS
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"UNTITLED" (2003) COMMISSIONED SITE-SPECIFIC MURAL INSTALLATION (GOUCHE/LATEX ON WALL) by CLARE ROJAS
Location: Master Bedroom Hallway, Pygmalion-2nd Floor

"ACHILLES" (2005) COMMISSIONED PAINTING by CLARE ROJAS
Location: Living Room, Pygmalion-First Floor

[SEVENTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:

The exhibition at Lizabeth Oliveria Gallery, Art Part II: Dazzle Dogs, featuring Clare Rojas, Erin Rosenthal and Andrew Jeffrey Wright, and up through April 16h has received a wonderful review over at L.A. Weekly. Here is text of review in its entirety, but do check out the L.A. Weekly link for the lovely illustrations of exhibit:

Call Them the Dazzle Dogs
Lizabeth Oliveria Gallery gives the boulevard more bark
by ARTY NELSON

It’s a little after 9:30 on a Saturday night, and I’m watching a 7-foot-tall skeleton aptly named Sleepy Bones shuffle and pirouette about in an elongated cube crowded with people. Sleepy Bones is talking, somewhat cryptically, about how much planet Earth has changed in the last few centuries. Over in the corner, a guy wearing nondescript pants and a polka-dotted smock pings away on a toy organ and drum while a kind of alterna–Little Red Riding Hood character ad-libs in an Anglo-Swedish accent, occasionally asking Sleepy Bones questions that the skeleton sort of responds to in strings of almost rhyming couplets. As audience members, we are very much in the middle of this drama, shifting back and forth in our limited-edition sneakers to accommodate Sleepy’s reckless dance, and although I’m at an opening at the Lizabeth Oliveria Gallery on La Cienega just north of Washington, I’m thinking that this is a very Rhode Island School of Design flashback seeing as how Clare Rojas and Erin Rosenthal, two of three artists in “Art Part II: Dazzle Dogs,” met there (the other artist in the show, Andrew Jeffrey Wright, lived in Providence, but didn’t go to RISD).

On the gallery walls are paintings with quilted borders, bright acrylics dominated by geometric shapes either painted on paper or directly on the wall, collages of groovy godlike creatures, and even a cluster of painted pebbles. From the rafters dangles a many-limbed papier-mâché sculpture. On a table by the back entrance, there’s a stand selling buttons for a buck, some zines and other art tchotchkes, and despite the fact that this is all happening in L.A. gallery world’s most recently anointed white hot corridor, La Cienega, the scene feels very far from anything slick or wealthy-collector-friendly, or any overly careerist constructs currently ruling the Land of Art. Rather, this feels like art in the grand bohemian tradition, messy and brimming with young ideals and questions and when the lights go down, more than likely, not many auto-sleds will be pointed toward Brentwood or Malibu.

Last May, Lizabeth Oliveria moved her gallery down from San Francisco almost on a whim after meeting L.A. gallerist Anna Helwing at the Art Chicago fair. “A year prior to that I would have never imagined being in Los Angeles,” she says. “I primarily work with emerging artists, and although I think San Francisco has an exceptionally strong group of those artists, it was really hard to actually get people to come through the gallery, especially when you’re talking about a more global scene. Since I’ve opened down here it’s been pretty amazing the amount of curators and critics and collectors that routinely come through.” When asked about the concept behind “Dazzle Dogs,” Oliveria confesses a laissez-faire attitude. “I approached Clare, who did a solo show with me up in San Francisco, and really she was the one who suggested including the other two artists,” she says. “Generally speaking, the way I work with artists, not just in this show but always, is that I trust the artists to do whatever they want with the space. This show was about having faith in Clare and subsequently trusting her instincts accordingly.”

As one takes in the show’s vibe — the bright palettes and handmade feel — no doubt, there’s a strong aesthetic overlap at work in “Dazzle Dogs.” Shades of folksy Americana mingle with state-of-the-art-pop culture bashing?, all mixed together with ’60s love and ’70s funk-deco patterns. The sum clearly concocts a whole that’s more psycho-loco than the parts. The effect feels like you’re in the midst of an art tribe that lives off the grid, but still cosmically borders the urban chaos.

Rojas has been on a roll as of late, contributing to museum shows at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Philly, Yerba Buena in S.F., and MOCA in Chicago. Her paintings — usually on paper, wood and stone — combine folk influences with an other-galaxy flavor and a feminist spirituality. In Rojas’ work, landscapes are filled with singing ponies, bearish torsos stuffed with precious gems perform handstands, bearded men are skewered on sharp, ornately decorated peaks, and birds are fused from lovely abstract shapes. Rojas says she wants her paintings to have the perspective that one might have staring off into a forest, a narrative taken in at a distance, but to still convey a vibrant emotional intensity.

Lately, Rojas has begun taking aim at society’s double standards by incorporating male nudes in her work. “There’s such an imbalance today. It’s hard to put a finger on it, but it’s everywhere in our culture, and I think that everyone’s so beaten down that we’ve become kind of numb to the repercussions,” she says. “But nature’s balanced, and things will happen as a result. Those images of women are not about sex or sexual freedom; they’re about money and selling. It’s not about nudity; it’s about the context.” One of her images features a naked man with a boner hugging a huge beer bottle.

Rojas also has a musical alter ego, Peggy Honeywell, whose framed lyrics are on display at the show. Occasionally, Rojas fashions sculptures upon which Honeywell performs.

Like Rojas, Andrew Jeffrey Wright is a multifaceted artist on the rise. His brightly colored patterned paintings, insane flowering bursts of Skittle-like pellets mixed with coy comic panels, screen prints and small, culturally subversive figurative works on paper create an effect that is not only visually dynamic but also politically astute. Mr. T fused with ET, Mr. eT With Soda (2004) resounds in a way that elevates both icons to a whole other perverse plane. Black and White Bart Simpsons play basketball one on one, while elsewhere plaid suitcases labeled “Weekend Drugs” are packed and at the ready. Along with impressive hand skills, Wright co-made the four-minute film Ich Bin Ein Manipulator (2003) with Rojas, a sly animated send-up, and “Dazzle Dogs” highlight, that mines the feel-bad-because-you-are-not-good-enough conceit behind the glossy-magazine industry.

“We’ve found that it’s a lot easier to get people to pay attention to something if they’re laughing than if we’re just hitting them over the heads with harsh facts,” says Wright.

Fulbright scholar Erin Rosenthal makes paintings, prints, sculptures, works on documentaries, plays the character Sleepy Bones and still finds time to wield the drumsticks for the band Urdog (she’s headed out on a three-week European tour after installing this show). For Rosenthal, the narrative is very important, and one can find consistent motifs in any single showing of her work as well as throughout the entire body. Her images are filled with extraterrestrial Buddhas, trees that appear alive and people constructed from ornate and bright patterns, not to mention the occasional pack of French fries.

“In my mind, when I make an image there’s always a story, and I like to think, an implied action as well. What’s important to me, though, is that the narrative not be didactic,” she says. “I like to leave a lot to the viewer’s imagination and interpretation. Some images are just really loaded and so heavy, so I find myself, every step of the way, making sure that I’m maintaining what I believe is a delicate balance.”

Rosenthal’s dangling sculptural piece, Out of Body ESP (2004), is abstract but still very much rooted in the figurative tradition, resembling a kind of outstretched super body soaring across the ceiling, the only difference being that this particular body includes a torso region comprised of a patch of clouds, bolts of lightning, eight different-size eyeballs and a two-arm section that looks like bicycle handlebars reaching out toward a heart that forms the prow of the sculpture. A body disjointed but yearning for a sense of wholeness, exploding across the sky.

As the evening progresses, the Nordic, alterna–Red Riding Hood character continues asking Sleepy Bones questions, but it’s clear Sleepy is beginning to lose steam, its loping elliptical orbits tightening more and more into herky-jerky twists until finally the tall skeleton waves farewell, disappearing back to its home — somewhere in Middle-earth, or Providence, Rhode Island.

*****
Prov.: Lizabeth Oliveria Gallery, Culver City, CA
# posted by EILEEN @ 11:46 AM


Friday, March 18, 2005
"AGENTS" (1996) (INK, GRAPHITE AND GEL MEDIUM ON CLEAR MYLAR, 17 x 11 IN) by SHARON LOUDEN
Location: Dining Room, Pygmalion-First Floor

"AGENTS" (1996) (INK, GRAPHITE AND GEL MEDIUM ON CLEAR MYLAR, 17 x 11 IN) by SHARON LOUDEN
Location: Dining Room, Pygmalion-First Floor

[SEVENTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:

Sharon Louden recently received a wonderful review of her painting exhibition at Anthony Grant by Jonathan Goodman in Art in America:

SHARON LOUDEN AT ANTHONY GRANT
By Jonathan Goodman

This show of Sharon Louden's paintings and sculptures demonstrated her propensity for the enigmatic gesture. Having graduated with a master's degree from Yale in 1991, Louden is better known for her drawings and sculpture, which have been exhibited extensively in the U.S., than for her paintings. The medium-size works in the series titled "The lingering" were all done in 2003-04 and created with watercolor, acrylic, and gel medium on wood panel. They consist of brushstroke-like forms that accumulate in one area of otherwise blank white panels. In each work, some of the marks are made only with outlines and others are filled in with washes. Although the press materials describe the shapes as "anthropomorphic," to this viewer they are suggestive of bacilli seen through the lens of a microscope. Whatever the origins of the imagery, an interesting tension exists in reading the marks as nature-based and as purely abstract--as explorations of form, tonal values, movement and over-all gestalt.

Within each painting, individual elements appear to drag themselves away from the pile-up, as if they were trying to escape. A particularly compelling grouping at the bottom left of one painting is done in a reddish sepia color. Some of the marks seem to be rising upward into the surrounding empty matter.

Louden also showed a series of sculptures, titled "Yellow Tails" (2004). The sculptures consist of groupings of lustrous white and yellow monofilament, about 3 feet or longer in length, hanging from the ceiling. Small clusters are held together by clips and joined in bunches. Several of these larger bunches are then hung close together, their brightly colored, light-catching ends resting on the floor. Like the "The Lingering" paintings, simple components are combined to create complex structures that suggest biological forms. They are as enigmatic as the paintings, provoking many interpretations, symbolic or allegorical. Both series in this show are small triumphs of material being.

*****
Prov.: Haines Gallery, San Francisco, CA
# posted by EILEEN @ 10:36 PM
"PATCHWORK: X-27 EXPLORER" (ROBOT SERIES) (2005) (VINTAGE PAPER, STITCHING HOLES. GRAPHITE, WATERCOLOR, INK) (4 X 4, FRAMED) by LISA SOLOMON
Location: Library, Pygmalion-First Floor

[SECOND MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:

Lisa Solomon is one of the artists featured in "Stuff n' Things," a group exhibit coming up at the San Pablo Art Gallery. Other artists will be John Rogers, Shalene Valenzuela and Lexa Walsh. There will be an Artists' Reception from 1-3 p.m. on Saturday, April 2 when the exhibit opens. The show will be up until May 22, 2005. Here's venue details:

Art Gallery
The San Pablo Art Gallery features local artists and group exhibitions on a monthly basis and is open Saturdays & Sundays 12:00 pm to 4:00 pm. The Art Gallery is located inside Maple Hall in the San Pablo Civic Center on the corner of San Pablo Avenue and Church Lane. We invite you to take a 360° Virtual Tour.

San Pablo Art Gallery
City of San Pablo
Maple Hall
13831 San Pablo Avenue
San Pablo, CA. 94806

Gallery Coordinator: Anne Austin, (510) 836-2663
Call (510) 215-3206 for more information

*****

Lisa (whose "Musings" blog is at this link that also features an image of a sweet robot, like the work I'm enjoying at home) also was mentioned and one of her works illustrated in Artweek when Marisa Olsen reviewed the "Emerge show."


***
Prov.: Graystone, San Francisco; 2005 San Francisco International Art Expo
# posted by EILEEN @ 2:15 PM
"MOONLIGHT" (1999) (WATERBASED MIXED MEDIA ON WOOD, 24 X 24 IN) by RICHARD TSAO
Location: Atop Turret Steps, Pygmalion-Second Floor

[FOURTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:

Richard Tsao's ongoing exhibition "Flood" at Chambers Fine Art in New York has received a wonderful review. Here it is:

ART REVIEWS
from Around New York
John Haber
in New York City

DIARY OF A CRITIC

3.2.05 RICHARD TSAO

For one extended moment, Richard Tsao took me beyond Petah Coyne's earth and completely into the space of vision. His modest canvases leave ample space for the white walls of Chambers Fine Art, where his paintings hang through early April. A still more intense white surrounds each work. That glow comes from using the gallery fixtures as broad spotlights, but it seems to arise from the work itself. If Robert Ryman enables white paint to cast colored shadows, Tsao uses concentrated color to fill a room with points of light.

Eventually, I had to break that moment and get closer, if only to see how he does it. The water-based medium contains fabric pigment and marble dust. He could tell you what else, but he would have to kill you first. The highly reflective components give even pale tones the depth of pure primary colors. As he pours paint, without a brush, the colors may blend, bleed into one another, or add to each other's intensity. Sometimes the cracks take on the fine detail of deliberate drawing. As with Morris Louis's darker poured paintings, the components visible along the sides come as a surprise and serve as part of the image, too.

They also call attention to its material support, and up close one perceives the paint as a series of thin layers on equal footing with canvas. The ground media give the layers considerable strength, even when they stick out irregularly from the edges. Occasionally Tsao peels off a chip as it dries and transplants it elsewhere. Like much of the color, those thin patches may make one think of flower petals as much as marble chips, and that labor over a painting's ground may have something in common with tending soil. The catalog essay, by Benjamin Genocchio, suggests a connection to the flower markets of the artist's childhood in Thailand.

The rough edges also make the canvases appear like fragments torn from something more continuous. The images, too, evoke a larger scale in space and time. They may recall river beds and lunar or planetary surfaces, and Tsao is fond of titles like Flood and Sci-Fi. No question such associations make poured paint comfortingly familiar, attractive, and self-referential. Color-field painting has a history, after all.

The associations have something else in common, too, however. They all exist in a space neither fully organic nor inorganic, like abstraction finding its way between the human image and material object. They suggest not just poured media and flowing color, but the marks of processes long past. They allow one again to see paint as both itself and trace, substance and image.

They help keep the work from coming off as a little too pretty, a little too neat, or a little too close to camp, like paintings of artificial flowers or retreads of Jules Olitski. I take comfort in knowing that work in progress normally lies all over Tsao's Brooklyn studio rather than on white walls, and he has had to negotiate with his landlord to keep the liquids from turning the place into another uninhabited world. I imagine it as yet a greater mutual saturation of the tactile and visual.

***
Prov.: Margaret Thatcher Projects, New York
# posted by EILEEN @ 1:54 PM

"PATCHWORK: X-27 EXPLORER" (ROBOT SERIES) (2005) (VINTAGE PAPER, STITCHING HOLES. GRAPHITE, WATERCOLOR, INK) (4 X 4, FRAMED) by LISA SOLOMON
Location: Library, Pygmalion-First Floor

[SECOND MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:


Lisa Solomon is one of the artists featured in "Stuff n' Things," a group exhibit coming up at the San Pablo Art Gallery. Other artists will be John Rogers, Shalene Valenzuela and Lexa Walsh. There will be an Artists' Reception from 1-3 p.m. on Saturday, April 2 when the exhibit opens. The show will be up until May 22, 2005. Here's venue details:

Art Gallery
The San Pablo Art Gallery features local artists and group exhibitions on a monthly basis and is open Saturdays & Sundays 12:00 pm to 4:00 pm. The Art Gallery is located inside Maple Hall in the San Pablo Civic Center on the corner of San Pablo Avenue and Church Lane. We invite you to take a 360° Virtual Tour.

San Pablo Art Gallery
City of San Pablo
Maple Hall
13831 San Pablo Avenue
San Pablo, CA. 94806

Gallery Coordinator: Anne Austin, (510) 836-2663
Call (510) 215-3206 for more information

*****

Lisa (whose "Musings" blog is at this link that also features an image of a sweet robot, like the work I'm enjoying at home) also was mentioned and one of her works illustrated in Artweek when Marisa Olsen reviewed the "Emerge show."


***
Prov.: Graystone, San Francisco; 2005 San Francisco International Art Expo

"MOONLIGHT" (1999) (WATERBASED MIXED MEDIA ON WOOD, 24 X 24 IN) by RICHARD TSAO
Location: Atop Turret Steps, Pygmalion-Second Floor

[FOURTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:


Richard Tsao's ongoing exhibition "Flood" at Chambers Fine Art in New York has received a wonderful review. Here it is:

ART REVIEWS
from Around New York
John Haber
in New York City

DIARY OF A CRITIC

3.2.05 RICHARD TSAO


For one extended moment, Richard Tsao took me beyond Petah Coyne's earth and completely into the space of vision. His modest canvases leave ample space for the white walls of Chambers Fine Art, where his paintings hang through early April. A still more intense white surrounds each work. That glow comes from using the gallery fixtures as broad spotlights, but it seems to arise from the work itself. If Robert Ryman enables white paint to cast colored shadows, Tsao uses concentrated color to fill a room with points of light.

Eventually, I had to break that moment and get closer, if only to see how he does it. The water-based medium contains fabric pigment and marble dust. He could tell you what else, but he would have to kill you first. The highly reflective components give even pale tones the depth of pure primary colors. As he pours paint, without a brush, the colors may blend, bleed into one another, or add to each other's intensity. Sometimes the cracks take on the fine detail of deliberate drawing. As with Morris Louis's darker poured paintings, the components visible along the sides come as a surprise and serve as part of the image, too.

They also call attention to its material support, and up close one perceives the paint as a series of thin layers on equal footing with canvas. The ground media give the layers considerable strength, even when they stick out irregularly from the edges. Occasionally Tsao peels off a chip as it dries and transplants it elsewhere. Like much of the color, those thin patches may make one think of flower petals as much as marble chips, and that labor over a painting's ground may have something in common with tending soil. The catalog essay, by Benjamin Genocchio, suggests a connection to the flower markets of the artist's childhood in Thailand.

The rough edges also make the canvases appear like fragments torn from something more continuous. The images, too, evoke a larger scale in space and time. They may recall river beds and lunar or planetary surfaces, and Tsao is fond of titles like Flood and Sci-Fi. No question such associations make poured paint comfortingly familiar, attractive, and self-referential. Color-field painting has a history, after all.

The associations have something else in common, too, however. They all exist in a space neither fully organic nor inorganic, like abstraction finding its way between the human image and material object. They suggest not just poured media and flowing color, but the marks of processes long past. They allow one again to see paint as both itself and trace, substance and image.

They help keep the work from coming off as a little too pretty, a little too neat, or a little too close to camp, like paintings of artificial flowers or retreads of Jules Olitski. I take comfort in knowing that work in progress normally lies all over Tsao's Brooklyn studio rather than on white walls, and he has had to negotiate with his landlord to keep the liquids from turning the place into another uninhabited world. I imagine it as yet a greater mutual saturation of the tactile and visual.

***
Prov.: Margaret Thatcher Projects, New York

Thursday, March 17, 2005

"UNTITLED" (2002) (GOUACHE ON WOOD PANEL) by CLARE ROJAS
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"UNTITLED" (2003) COMMISSIONED SITE-SPECIFIC MURAL INSTALLATION (GOUCHE/LATEX ON WALL) by CLARE ROJAS
Location: Master Bedroom Hallway, Pygmalion-2nd Floor

"ACHILLES" (2005) COMMISSIONED PAINTING by CLARE ROJAS
Location: Living Room, Pygmalion-First Floor

[SEVENTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:


The exhibition at Lizabeth Oliveria Gallery, Art Part II: Dazzle Dogs, featuring Clare Rojas, Erin Rosenthal and Andrew Jeffrey Wright, and up through April 16h has received a wonderful review over at L.A. Weekly. Here is text of review in its entirety, but do check out the L.A. Weekly link for the lovely illustrations of exhibit:

Call Them the Dazzle Dogs
Lizabeth Oliveria Gallery gives the boulevard more bark
by ARTY NELSON


It’s a little after 9:30 on a Saturday night, and I’m watching a 7-foot-tall skeleton aptly named Sleepy Bones shuffle and pirouette about in an elongated cube crowded with people. Sleepy Bones is talking, somewhat cryptically, about how much planet Earth has changed in the last few centuries. Over in the corner, a guy wearing nondescript pants and a polka-dotted smock pings away on a toy organ and drum while a kind of alterna–Little Red Riding Hood character ad-libs in an Anglo-Swedish accent, occasionally asking Sleepy Bones questions that the skeleton sort of responds to in strings of almost rhyming couplets. As audience members, we are very much in the middle of this drama, shifting back and forth in our limited-edition sneakers to accommodate Sleepy’s reckless dance, and although I’m at an opening at the Lizabeth Oliveria Gallery on La Cienega just north of Washington, I’m thinking that this is a very Rhode Island School of Design flashback seeing as how Clare Rojas and Erin Rosenthal, two of three artists in “Art Part II: Dazzle Dogs,” met there (the other artist in the show, Andrew Jeffrey Wright, lived in Providence, but didn’t go to RISD).

On the gallery walls are paintings with quilted borders, bright acrylics dominated by geometric shapes either painted on paper or directly on the wall, collages of groovy godlike creatures, and even a cluster of painted pebbles. From the rafters dangles a many-limbed papier-mâché sculpture. On a table by the back entrance, there’s a stand selling buttons for a buck, some zines and other art tchotchkes, and despite the fact that this is all happening in L.A. gallery world’s most recently anointed white hot corridor, La Cienega, the scene feels very far from anything slick or wealthy-collector-friendly, or any overly careerist constructs currently ruling the Land of Art. Rather, this feels like art in the grand bohemian tradition, messy and brimming with young ideals and questions and when the lights go down, more than likely, not many auto-sleds will be pointed toward Brentwood or Malibu.

Last May, Lizabeth Oliveria moved her gallery down from San Francisco almost on a whim after meeting L.A. gallerist Anna Helwing at the Art Chicago fair. “A year prior to that I would have never imagined being in Los Angeles,” she says. “I primarily work with emerging artists, and although I think San Francisco has an exceptionally strong group of those artists, it was really hard to actually get people to come through the gallery, especially when you’re talking about a more global scene. Since I’ve opened down here it’s been pretty amazing the amount of curators and critics and collectors that routinely come through.” When asked about the concept behind “Dazzle Dogs,” Oliveria confesses a laissez-faire attitude. “I approached Clare, who did a solo show with me up in San Francisco, and really she was the one who suggested including the other two artists,” she says. “Generally speaking, the way I work with artists, not just in this show but always, is that I trust the artists to do whatever they want with the space. This show was about having faith in Clare and subsequently trusting her instincts accordingly.”

As one takes in the show’s vibe — the bright palettes and handmade feel — no doubt, there’s a strong aesthetic overlap at work in “Dazzle Dogs.” Shades of folksy Americana mingle with state-of-the-art-pop culture bashing?, all mixed together with ’60s love and ’70s funk-deco patterns. The sum clearly concocts a whole that’s more psycho-loco than the parts. The effect feels like you’re in the midst of an art tribe that lives off the grid, but still cosmically borders the urban chaos.

Rojas has been on a roll as of late, contributing to museum shows at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Philly, Yerba Buena in S.F., and MOCA in Chicago. Her paintings — usually on paper, wood and stone — combine folk influences with an other-galaxy flavor and a feminist spirituality. In Rojas’ work, landscapes are filled with singing ponies, bearish torsos stuffed with precious gems perform handstands, bearded men are skewered on sharp, ornately decorated peaks, and birds are fused from lovely abstract shapes. Rojas says she wants her paintings to have the perspective that one might have staring off into a forest, a narrative taken in at a distance, but to still convey a vibrant emotional intensity.

Lately, Rojas has begun taking aim at society’s double standards by incorporating male nudes in her work. “There’s such an imbalance today. It’s hard to put a finger on it, but it’s everywhere in our culture, and I think that everyone’s so beaten down that we’ve become kind of numb to the repercussions,” she says. “But nature’s balanced, and things will happen as a result. Those images of women are not about sex or sexual freedom; they’re about money and selling. It’s not about nudity; it’s about the context.” One of her images features a naked man with a boner hugging a huge beer bottle.

Rojas also has a musical alter ego, Peggy Honeywell, whose framed lyrics are on display at the show. Occasionally, Rojas fashions sculptures upon which Honeywell performs.

Like Rojas, Andrew Jeffrey Wright is a multifaceted artist on the rise. His brightly colored patterned paintings, insane flowering bursts of Skittle-like pellets mixed with coy comic panels, screen prints and small, culturally subversive figurative works on paper create an effect that is not only visually dynamic but also politically astute. Mr. T fused with ET, Mr. eT With Soda (2004) resounds in a way that elevates both icons to a whole other perverse plane. Black and White Bart Simpsons play basketball one on one, while elsewhere plaid suitcases labeled “Weekend Drugs” are packed and at the ready. Along with impressive hand skills, Wright co-made the four-minute film Ich Bin Ein Manipulator (2003) with Rojas, a sly animated send-up, and “Dazzle Dogs” highlight, that mines the feel-bad-because-you-are-not-good-enough conceit behind the glossy-magazine industry.

“We’ve found that it’s a lot easier to get people to pay attention to something if they’re laughing than if we’re just hitting them over the heads with harsh facts,” says Wright.

Fulbright scholar Erin Rosenthal makes paintings, prints, sculptures, works on documentaries, plays the character Sleepy Bones and still finds time to wield the drumsticks for the band Urdog (she’s headed out on a three-week European tour after installing this show). For Rosenthal, the narrative is very important, and one can find consistent motifs in any single showing of her work as well as throughout the entire body. Her images are filled with extraterrestrial Buddhas, trees that appear alive and people constructed from ornate and bright patterns, not to mention the occasional pack of French fries.

“In my mind, when I make an image there’s always a story, and I like to think, an implied action as well. What’s important to me, though, is that the narrative not be didactic,” she says. “I like to leave a lot to the viewer’s imagination and interpretation. Some images are just really loaded and so heavy, so I find myself, every step of the way, making sure that I’m maintaining what I believe is a delicate balance.”

Rosenthal’s dangling sculptural piece, Out of Body ESP (2004), is abstract but still very much rooted in the figurative tradition, resembling a kind of outstretched super body soaring across the ceiling, the only difference being that this particular body includes a torso region comprised of a patch of clouds, bolts of lightning, eight different-size eyeballs and a two-arm section that looks like bicycle handlebars reaching out toward a heart that forms the prow of the sculpture. A body disjointed but yearning for a sense of wholeness, exploding across the sky.

As the evening progresses, the Nordic, alterna–Red Riding Hood character continues asking Sleepy Bones questions, but it’s clear Sleepy is beginning to lose steam, its loping elliptical orbits tightening more and more into herky-jerky twists until finally the tall skeleton waves farewell, disappearing back to its home — somewhere in Middle-earth, or Providence, Rhode Island.

*****
Prov.: Lizabeth Oliveria Gallery, Culver City, CA

Wednesday, March 09, 2005

"[] (HAND, MAPPED OUT, PAINTED/DRAWN AGAINST HAND-MADE PAPER) by SANTIAGO BOSE
Location: Babaylan Lodge

[SEVENTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:


Pusod, Center for Ecology, Culture and Bayan (Berkeley, CA) presents a March 19, 2005 book launch and film premiere focused around the works of Santiago "Santi" Bose. Click here for more information. The book launch is for a monograph on Santi's work, ESPIRITU SANTI: The Strange Life and Even Stranger Legacy of Santiago Bose, which includes two of my art essays and several of my poems (further reprinted in my new book I TAKE THEE, ENGLISH, FOR MY BELOVED).

Also featured will be a film by Santi's daughter, Lilledeshan Bose:

"my break ups into a million pieces" (16 min) is about a young woman's migration to Southern California after the death of her father, famous painter Santiago Bose. Directed by amir motlagh and written by Lilledeshan Bose, this 16-minute film, shot in digital video and super 8, is an exploration of personal and spiritual identity, death, romantic relationships and the myth of Americana from a Filipino perspective. Co-produced by Motlagh and Bose, the film-essay is punctuated with original music written by Bose with various Orange County bands and features many artists (painter Reza PorMansor, producer Alex Xenophon) from the Santa Ana underground. With gorgeous shots of Los Angeles freeways and endless blue skies, "my break ups into a million pieces" marks the transition to new country and a new life: the rush of a brave, sunshiney new world.

WRITER'S BIOGRAPHY
Lilledeshan Bose is an award-winning writer and musician. Born and raised in the Philippines, she moved to America two years ago. She works as an editor at a daily newspaper in Riverside, Calif. Before she moved to America, she was the features editor of Seventeen Magazine Philippines. She also wrote a teen novel called "Una and Miguel"(Adarna House, 2002). Her works of essay, fiction and poetry have appeared in international anthologies and publications such as Philippine Daily Inquirer, Asiaweek, Cosmopolitan and FHM. Her works have been translated in four languages. She is a graduate of the University of the Philippines, Diliman, where she majored in creative writing. She misses her father dearly. www.lilledeshan.com

DIRECTOR'S BIOGRAPHY
Amir Motlagh's filmography as a writer/director includes the films "Dino Adino," "Lover @ 11:47" and "Still Lover." In 2004 he added to his output, finishing two beautifully crafted documentaries titled "Pumkin Little" and "my break ups into a million pieces" both set for release in 2005. The first three films have played in over 30 festivals and film-related shows, winning five awards including an "Audience Award" at DancesWithFilms 2003, "Best of the Fest" YardFest 2003, "Outstanding Lead Actor" WestFest 2003 and two "Audience Awards" at Friday Night Shorts. His film "Still Lover" was also named, "Top Ten Atom Films of 2004" and is going on an 18-city world tour in 2005. In 2005 Motlagh also released a lo-fi 6 part video series titled, "Lessons in Self-Destruction." Motlagh is also a trained actor and holds a BA degree in Psychology from UCLA. He seeks smart producers to work on two feature films that will define a new genre.

Here are event details:

SATURDAY, MARCH 19
8-10PM
Pusod
1808 5th St.
Berkeley, CA, USA 94710
For info, call:   (510) 883-1808

***
Prov.: Direct from Artist

Tuesday, March 08, 2005

"UNTITLED" (2002) (GOUACHE ON WOOD PANEL) by CLARE ROJAS
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"UNTITLED" (2003) COMMISSIONED SITE-SPECIFIC MURAL INSTALLATION (GOUCHE/LATEX ON WALL) by CLARE ROJAS
Location: Master Bedroom Hallway, Pygmalion-2nd Floor

"ACHILLES" (2005) COMMISSIONED PAINTING by CLARE ROJAS
Location: Living Room, Pygmalion-First Floor

[SIXTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:


Clare Rojas is part of a new group exhibition at Lizabeth Oliveria Gallery. Here's the gallery's press release:

Lizabeth Oliveria Gallery is delighted to present Art Part II: Dazzle Dogs, an exhibition by Clare Rojas, Erin Rosenthal and Andrew Jeffrey Wright, March 5th - April 9th. There will be a reception for the artists on Saturday, March 5th from 7-9pm with a musical performance by Peggy Honeywell.

Clare Rojas's recurring repertory of whimsical animals, beguiling figures, and dream-like landscapes initially seems to reference classic fairy and folk tales, popular culture, and western art. However, the closer one looks at her meticulously painted scenes, the more one discovers her own idiosyncratic iconography. Filled with archetypes that are both magical and malevolent, Rojas's work elicits different associations and meanings from each viewer.

Rojas was born in Columbus, Ohio. She received her BFA in Printmaking at the Rhode Island School of Design in 1998, and her MFA at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2002. Rojas has exhibited her work at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; The Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia; the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts; and The Luggage Store in San Francisco. Her recent exhibitions include solo exhibitions, Table Turner at Deitch Projects, New York and Will Poor Will at the Belkin Satellite at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. Currently her work is on view in the Beautiful Losers exhibition at the Orange County Museum of Art, CA. Rojas is the first recipient of the Headlands Center for the Arts Tournesol Award, and in 2003 Rojas also received the prestigious Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Award.

A reoccurring theme in Erin Rosenthal's work is invented and evolving personal mythology. Through a rediscovery of ancient memory and belief in peace, her characters and the worlds they inhabit reflect a synthesis of cultural beliefs. Rosenthal is repeatedly intrigued by the precarious dynamic between modern civilization and the natural world. She aims to create work that although narrative in content and form, allows the viewer space to free-associate and construct his/her own interpretation.

Erin Rosenthal was born in 1976 in Providence, R.I, and holds a B.A. in Film/Animation/Video from the Rhode Island School of Design. In 2000-2001, she received a Fulbright Scholarship for film study at the Academy of Fine Arts Krakow, Poland. Her work has been seen in Forest For Us, The Space at Alice, Providence, RI; Summer Printing Pool, Gallery Rocket, Tokyo, Japan; Paper Rodeo Traveling Show, The
Beguiling, Toronto, Ontario; and Space 1026 & Friends, Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia, PA.

Andrew Jeffrey Wright lives in Philadelphia, PA. where he is a co-founder of Space 1026, an art collective. Wright’s artwork ranges from painting, screen-printing and drawing to artists’ zines collaborating with a variety of artists. His work has been seen in numerous exhibitions including, Beaver College, Exhibition of Collectives: The Royal Art Lodge, Paper Rodeo; The Skull Show, Hanna, Tokyo, Japan; #20, w/Hisham Akira Bharoocha, Bjorn Copeland, Scott Wolniak, Champion Fine Art, Brooklyn, NY; Outerspace Hillbilly, w/Barry McGee, Leif Goldberg & Clare Rojas, Luggage Store, San Francisco, CA; Odd Fellows, w/Marcel Dzama & Michael Dumontier, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia, PA; and Headlands Center for the Arts, Project Space with Barry McGee, Devin Flynn, Dan Murphy, Isaac, Lin, Clare Rojas and Paper Rad, Sausalito, CA.

The Manipulators, his animated film made in collaboration with Clare Rojas, has received numerous awards, including Best Animation at the New York Underground Film Festival (2000). Wright received his B.F.A. from the University of the Arts, Philadelphia.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
lizabeth oliveria gallery
2712 s. la cienega blvd.
los angeles, ca 90034
(t) 310.837.1073
(f) 310.837.1740
web@lizabetholiveria.com

***
Prov.: Lizabeth Oliveira Gallery, Culver City, CA

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