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Sunday, March 19, 2006

"[] (SKETCH OF CORKSCREW)" IN E.T.'S ART/POETRY JOURNAL by SHIMON OKSHTEYN
Location: Library, Pygmalion, Second Floor

[SECOND MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

Shimon Okshteyn's exhibit, "After Lifes: New Paintings and Sculpture" is up at Stefan Stux, New York, through March 25, 2006.

***
Prov.: Direct from Artist

"WALLPAPER FOR GIRLS: YOUR MOTHER AS STRIPPER TATTOOS" (1997) (OIL ON VINYL, 30 x 30 IN) by INKA ESSENHIGH
Location: Red Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

[SIXTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

Inka Essenhigh has an ongoing exhibition, through April 15, 2006, at 303 Gallery in New York City.

***
Prov.: Stefan Stux Fine Arts, New York City

ANTIQUE POT (LARGE) (PERSIAN, IMPORTED FROM ISFAHAN)
Location: Living Room, Pygmalion-First Floor

ANTIQUE POTS (TWO SMALL) (PERSIAN, IMPORTED FROM ISFAHAN)
Location: Library Bathroom, Pygmalion-First Floor

Darioush is a Napa winery. Its tasting room, within a building inspired by Persepolis, was deliberately designed to look more like a hotel lobby, complete with gift stands offering other souvenirs besides wine. Among them were ancient pots imported from Isfahan, the capital of Iran from 1599-1722. Mr. Darioush is from Iran. We visited there today and, while not impressed with the wines, fell in love with these three pots.

***
Prov.: Darioush Winery, Napa, CA

Friday, March 17, 2006

"SOO D'OUDEN SONGEN, SOO PYPEN DE JONGEN" by Anonymous copying Adriaen Brouwer (OIL ON WOOD) (Dutch School, 20th Century)
Location: Dining Room, Pygmalion-First Floor

We like living with well-painted paintings, even by "Anonymous"-es as long as they're, duh, well-painted. And this one is!

***
Prov.: Sotheby's, Amsterdam

Thursday, March 16, 2006

"WARPED WOMEN," (COLLAGE, MIXED-MEDIA PAINTING) by SUSAN BEE
Location: Red Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

FIFTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATES]

UPDATE:


Susan Bee's most recent exhibit, a dual one with her own artist-mother Miriam Laufer, is featured in the just-released issue of BROOKLYN RAIL. Here's an excerpt from the article by Robert Morgan:

"Susan Bee’s paintings function on a different level by sustaining a different order. In her case, one might speak of 'order' quite literally as a kind of metonymy, in which abstract ideas are signified by concrete symbols: an unconscious Foucaultian order, perhaps, but not entirely. I have always understood Bee’s paintings in terms of allegory, a kind of intrinsic narrative in which nouns and verbs float in suspension of one another. The Cabbalistic and/or Saussurean tree that forms the spine of her recent paintings spreads inexorably across the picture plane, encircling an enigmatic miscellany of pictograms in its branches. It is simply there without a name, yet potentially awaiting its name.

"In his famous speech in Houston in 1957, Duchamp talked about the viewer being the one who completes the work of art. The artist has the idea, but the work may or may not transmit the idea. This is for the viewer to decide. So, in a painting such as 'Bound and Unbound' (2004), the viewer must decide whether or not to name the tree according to the fragments of imagery that are held within it. But the naming always comes shy of resolution, due to the linguistic parameters that reveal the limits of rational thought. Thus, in one sense, Bee is pushing the boundaries of painting further than her mother (although the two artists possess a similar tactile resonance that opens the surface to an expansion of feeling, both physical and emotional.)

"But look at the magazine creatures that occupy the limbs of Susan Bee’s unnamable tree! These images are the ghosts of pulp fiction from another era -- an era more tactile in its appeal for significance than our own. Look! There’s Felix the Cat! And look again! There’s the Macarena, the weeping woman who parades the dolorous alleys of Segovia. The trunk of the tree is a dark-skinned mother and child. Egyptian eyes, birds, flowers and pyramids are scattered throughout. The centerpiece -- or optical focal point -- is a bound woman, a mummy perhaps, in the dark space beneath the branches of the tree. On the opposite side are boy-and-girl storybook characters from the twenties or thirties, haunting our memories from ages past, now enshrouded in mystery.

"Bee’s tree is about how memory produces mystery and perhaps how mystery reinvents memory. Her painting is a storybook espionage, a spying on the past, an interlude, an interval between presence and absence, between the naming and the unnamed. Bee’s feminism is bound to the narrative as the story is bound to the feminist impulse to open up the relative past in relation to the relative present, to explore the hidden texts and subtexts submerged under the current veneer of media consciousness. These image/texts seem to perpetually raise the issue of where we are and who we are, as the loss of tactility takes us into a virtual world where feeling is divorced from ideology and narratives reap disaster through ultimate whimsy and absurdity. But for Bee I do not sense the absurd as hopelessness, but rather as a spur for reconciliation, as a matter of dealing with our heads and our bodies, the locus between behavior and language."

***
Prov.: A.I.R. Gallery, New York; Direct from Artist

"INFORMAL ECONOMY VENDORS, #8" (2005) (ANALOG AND DIGITAL MEDIA RENDERED AND CUT ON VINYL MATERIAL) (1 OF 5) by JULIO CESAR MORALES
Location: Living Room, Pygmalion-First Floor

[SECOND MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

Julio Cesar Morales is offering a workshop at San Francisco's oldest performing arts space:

Intersection for the Arts presents
Accidental Audiences & Community Engagement
A workshop with Julio Cesar Morales
and Guest Artist Claudia Bernardi

Saturdays, April 1, 8, 22 & 29
11am to 2pm - $180

Limited space is available...reserve your spot today.

This four-week workshop taught by Bay Area visual artist and educator Julio Cesar Morales, focuses on community-based public art/social justice practices and issues within contemporary art, through lectures, readings and discussions. The workshop will also concentrate on community engagement, grants funding, developing and implementing public projects and social interventions. As an outcome of the workshop, participants will write grant proposals for personal projects with the guidance of workshop instructor. Special guests include artist/activist Claudia Benardi among others.

Julio Cesar Morales uses a range of media including photography, video, and printed and digital media to make conceptual projects that address the productive friction that occurs in trans-cultural territories such as urban Tijuana and San Francisco, and in inherently impure media such as popular music and graphic design. He studied in the New Genres department at The San Francisco Art Institute, resent solo exhibitions include, Fototeca de Havana in Cuba, Peres Projects in Los Angeles and The San Diego Museum of Contemporary Art with groups shows at The San Juan Triennial in Puerto Rico and representing Mexico at the 2005 Arco International Art Fair in Spain. He has received awards from Rockefeller Foundation, The San Francisco Arts Commission's Public Art Program, The Fleishhacker Foundation, The Ed Fund, The Creative Work Fund, Levis Strass Foundation, and The Art Council/Artadia. Morales with Bob Linder are currently operating Queens Nails Annex, an experimental art space and record label for visual artists in San Francisco.

Claudia Bernardi, internationally recognized human rights and social justice activist, will guest teach the last session of this workhsop. Bernardi has presented her sculpture, installations, and prints in more than 40 solo exhibitions worldwide.

A native of Argentina, Claudia Bernardi works as both an artist and a human rights activist. As a forensic anthropologist, she has exhumed the remains of many victims of political repression. According to Angelina Snodgrass Godroy of the Center for Latin American Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, "Claudia Bernardi's artwork is inspired by suffering, yet infused with life. Drawing upon experiences of state terror--such as the exhumation of mass graves in Central America--the artist's challenge is to resurrect beauty amid the bloodshed and in doing so, to refuse to succumb to the silencing embrace of political repression."

In 2004, Bernardi was awarded an Honorary Doctor of Fine Arts by the College of Wooster, Ohio. She received an MFA from the National Institute of Fine Arts in Buenos Aires, and an MA and her second MFA from the University of California at Berkeley. She has taught at the Universidad del Salvador, Colegio Nacional de Buenos Aires, California College of the Arts, the San Francisco Art Institute, and the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. She was a California Arts Council Artist-in-Residence from 1990-1993 and 1994-1995 for the Artist in the Community project directed to the population of political refugees and survivors of torture from Latin America, and was an East Bay Community Foundation Art Project Artist-in-Residence in 1993-1994.

In 2004, Bernardi received a Potrero Nuevo Fund Grant to create an art school/ open studio in Perquin, a rural community in El Salvador.

You may make a reservation for this workshop by visiting us at www.theintersection.org, or by calling our offices at 415-626-2787.

Intersection for the Arts
446 Valencia Street (between 15 & 16)
San Francisco, CA 94103
(415) 626-2787, www.theintersection.org


***
Prov.: Direct from Artist

"ENSO" (DRAWING ON FOUR PIECES OF HANDMADE PAPER) by MAX GIMBLETT
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"UNTITLED" (COLLABORATIVE DRAWING ON BUTCHER PAPER BETWEEN MAX GIMBLETT, E.T., T.P. AND NOMI) (2001)
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"[]" (2003) (PRINT, 15/25) by MAX GIMBLETT
Location: Yellow Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

"UNTITLED" (SUMI INK DRAWING AGAINST ASIA SOCIETY PROGRAMS) (2001) by MAX GIMBLETT
Location: Babaylan Lodge

POETRY/ART BROADSIDE by MAX GIMBLETT AND E.T.
Location: Babaylan Lodge

"DOUBLE HEADED CREATURE FEATURE" (ARTISTS' BOOK, 17.5 X 7 X 0.5 IN) by MAX GIMBLETT AND JOHN YAU WITH TOBY HINES
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

DRAWINGS IN TWO OF E.T.'S ART/POETRY JOURNALS by MAX GIMBLETT
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

DRAWINGS IN TWO COPIES OF MAX GIMBLETT MONOGRAPH by MAX GIMBLETT (2003)
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

EPHEMERA by MAX GIMBLETT
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

[SIXTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATES]

Max Gimblett just opened a new exhibition on at 222 E41st Street between 2nd and 3rd Avenues in New York City. The building is open 24/7 and houses New Zealand Trade and Enterprises.

Max also opened on March 14 an exhibition of new works, "Banquet", at Gow Langsford Gallery in New Zealand. Max will be teaching at Auckland University while the exhibition is up.

In other news, Searchings - The Journals of Max Gimblett will be published this month by Holloway Press, Auckland University, with text by Alan Loney and illustrations and two original ink drawings in each book by Max.

Max Gimblett and Alan Loney's Mondrian's Flowers is also shown in "Too Much Bliss: Twenty Years of Granary Books" at Smith College Museum of Art, Northhampton, MA.

Max has written "Nine Easy Pieces," an article for New Zealand Art Monthly, which can be read here.

***
Prov.: Direct from Artist

Sunday, March 12, 2006

"[]" by DULCIE DEE (WATERCOLOR AND MIXED MEDIA)
Location: Red Bedroom, Pygmalion-Second Floor

[FIFTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

Dulcie Dee is among the artists in the following ongoing exhibition:

"Light My Ire"
Feb. 16 - May 31, 2006
Main Gallery of FusionArts Museum
57 Stanton Street
Manhattan, New York

Artists in Exhibition: Paul Cabezas (also the curator), Dulcie Dee, Maria Davidoff, J. Taylor Basker, Kiri Bermack, Carl Carvano, Gregory Castillo, Moki Cherry, Paul DiLella, Jocelyn Fisef, Flash Light, Dennis Golden, Rene Hinds, Hi Tek Hoop, Liz N-Val, Joe Maynard, Peter Missing, Billy Parrot, Patricia O'Rourke, Daniel Ramirez, Phil Rostek, Allan Rabin, Jon Schluenz and Rafael Velez.

The exhibit also received coverage in The Filipino Reporter, New York, Feb. 24-March 2, 2006 edition. The article notes that the exhibit was made possible with the help of the New York State Concil on the Arts, and sponsored by Converging Arts Media Organization, a nonprofit charity arts organization that brings innovative art and arts related events to the Lower East Side of New York City.

***
Prov.: Direct from Artist

Sunday, March 05, 2006

"WHILE MIA SLEEPS" (ACRYLIS ON CANVAS) by CRISTINA QUERRER
Location: Galatea Offsite--SF Apartment

"VOLCANIC LAUGHTER" (ACRYLIC ON CANVAS) by CRISTINA QUERRER
Location: Galatea Offsite--SF Apartment

"UMBILICAL" (ON PAPER) (2003) by CRISTINA QUERRER
Location: TBD

OH MOI GOD! This was totally unexpected!!!! Friday's mail brought these three artworks from Florida-based poet and painter Cristina Querrer. Beautiful and unexpected! I am so grateful when artists share what they're up to -- in Cristina's case, I hadn't heard from her in a while (I once wrote an article on her paintings here) and then, this gift! Wheeeee!

THANK YOU, CRISTINA! And, yes, indeed, I can promise you they are in a good home.

***
Prov.: Direct from Artist.

"UNTITLED" (1999) (OIL, MIXED MEDIA ON PANEL, 71.75 X 71.75 IN) by RON EHRLICH
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"UNTITLED" (2003) (OIL, MIXED MEDIA ON PANEL, 16 X 16 IN) by RON EHRLICH
Location: Hallway to Library, Pygmalion-First Floor

DRAWING IN ET'S ART/POETRY JOURNAL (VOL. II) (2002) by RON EHRLICH
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

[THIRD MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

Ron Ehrlich just opened a new solo exhibition at Stephen Haller Gallery in New York. It's up through April 4, 2006!

***
Prov.: Stephen Haller Gallery, New York

KIAUWE ASH GLAZE VASE (200[6]) by ADAM G. FIELD
Location: Kitchen, Pygmalion-First Floor

[FOURTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:


The first pot by Adam Field that we purchased through the Four Seasons Art Program 2005 in Maui, was destroyed during shipping. Happily, we were able to obtain a replacement pot and it now sits cheerfully in Pygmalion's kitchen where it communes with an ancient French pot -- yadda.

This second pot arrived with Adam Field's "Artist Statement" which I replicate below:

I am fascinated with antique pottery and its unique ability to speak of the people, places and cultures of its origin. This fascination inspires me to create pottery that speaks of my own time and place. I work toward a clean aesthetic that celebrates the masterful simplicity of antique Far Eastern pottery, while retaining the modest utility of colonial American wares.

My pieces are made on the potter's wheel from the highest quality translucent porcelain. I carve intricate patterns into the surface of the porcelain when it has dried to the "leather hard" stage. The stylized abstractions of nature on the surfaces of my works reflects my greate admiration for the beautiful place I call home. Once completely dry, the pieces are fired at a low temperature before personally formulated glazes are applied. Finally the works are fired to Cone 11 (2380F) transforming them into highly durable vessels made to carry the marks of their maker into the unknown.


***
Prov.: Direct from Artist.

"DER DOZEN DANTZ (THE DANCE OF DEATH)" (1991) (INK ON PAPER, 24 X 18 IN, 36 x 28 IN FRAMED) by MANUEL OCAMPO
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"UNTITLED (Bird, Pink, Cross, Shit)" (2005) (30" X 24", oil on canvas) by Manuel Ocampo
Location: Living Room, Pygmalion-First Floor

[SEVENTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

Manuel Ocampo has a new exhibit forthcoming at Gray Kapernekas Gallery in New York City: here's the gallery's info:

Manuel Ocampo
24 March –- 29 April 2006
In his first solo exhibition in New York since 2000, Ocampo will exhibit new paintings that continue his ongoing interest in hierarchies of power. Using imagery from art historical, religious, and political sources, Ocampo's pictures are Gothic and disturbing, iconic and provocative.


***
MO: Prov.: Pearl Albino, New York; Lizabeth Oliveria Gallery, Culver City, CA.

"LOVING" (2005) (ACRYLIC & MIXED MEDIA ON PAPER) (13 x 13 UN) by TRAVIS SOMERVILLE
Location: Galatea Offsite-San Francisco Apartment

[FIFTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:

Travis Somerville's exhibition at Nathan Larramendy Gallery entitled "Peckerwood Nation" recently received coverage in the VC Reporter on Thursday, February 23, 2006.

Question authority
Travis Somerville’s art enlightens, enrages and, above all, sparks conversation

~ By MATTHEW SINGER ~

George Bush is watching Ojai.

From the front window of the Nathan Larramendy Gallery, the eight-foot floating head of the president is peering out at this humble hillside community with a cold, unsettling gaze. His enormous eyes — as big as a giant squid’s — are almost unnaturally blue. Oil is pouring from his ears and mouth, vainly collected in a Mason jar below his chin. His lips are framed with white makeup, as if he just finished performing in a minstrel show. Lincoln Logs tumble down in front of his face, as pictures of John Kennedy, George Washington and the red-and-white cross logo of the Ku Klux Klan bleed into the background around him. And branded across his forehead, in Old English lettering like a prison tattoo, is the word “peckerwood,” a slur typically directed at racist Southerners.

It’s a grotesque image, the implications of which are clear. It took artist Travis Somerville six years to build up the courage to manifest his nightmarish vision on paper — and not because he was afraid of expressing the ideas behind it.

“I couldn’t even look at the guy,” he says. “I started at the face and eventually I became completely removed from who it was. I had no idea what it was going to be.”

Like the majority of Somerville’s work, the Bush piece, titled “God Said … Tear Down the House of Lincoln,” is ugly — vivid, disturbing, startling and powerful, too, but, ultimately, ugly. And that’s the point. It, as with the whole of his solo exhibition Peckerwood Nation, is about confronting ugliness: not only that which surrounds us, but also that which exists inside us, as human beings and, especially, as Americans. Combining explosive, large-scale collages with smaller, subtler drawings, Somerville creates a portrait of a country that has yet to come to terms with its tortured past. At the same time, he also explores his own history.

“In a way, it’s overtly political, but it’s also autobiographical,” says Nathan Larramendy, who met Somerville when he was hired to help sell his art in San Francisco. This is the second exhibit of his work Larramendy has hosted at his gallery. “Travis is not trying to make a comment for society as a whole. It’s his individual perspective. It might be a collective perspective, but he’s not trying to give a particular group a voice. It’s just his personal voice.”

Growing up in the South in the 1960s, Somerville, 42, was practically born into the fire of America’s burning racial tension. Although he is white, his mother and father — a teacher and an Episcopalian minister, respectively — were vocal advocates of the civil rights movement, making them targets for a particular strand of bigotry. “We were run out of a few towns,” he says. “My father had to leave churches because things didn’t work out.” As a result, Somerville spent his childhood in constant transition, bouncing from Georgia to Tennessee to Maryland to Connecticut; he estimates he lived in 14 different houses by the time he was 16. Everywhere he went, he observed the inherited divides that kept people separated from one another. It wasn’t until much later, however, that he fully recognized how much his upbringing differed from that of his peers. “My parents being politically active and involved shaped who I am today … But I didn’t really pay attention to that stuff until I got older. Going to war protests was just a common weekend for me.”

Art, on the other hand, was something Somerville grasped the significance of at an early age. His first project was a freelance piece: gluing sticks and rocks to the family Volkswagen. “I vaguely remember doing it,” he recalls. “I remember more getting in trouble for it.” Still, his parents encouraged his creative sensibilities. In high school, Somerville realized that his interest in art could expand into more than just a hobby. A pivotal moment occurred during his senior year, when he traveled to Washington to see an exhibit of the 19th-century French sculptor Auguste Rodin. Initially, he was more enthused by the potential for partying, but the immensity of the sculptures on display galvanized his desire to become a professional artist. “The ambition was something that meant a lot to me. There are artists today that I admire for their ambition more than their work. I really admire ambition, where there’s no limits, no boundaries.”

He enrolled at the San Francisco Art Institute in 1984. Finally, Somerville found himself in a place where his views were not at odds with the cultural consensus. Naturally, he fell in love with the famously liberal city and, for the first time in his life, he felt settled; he still lives there today (though he’s planning on relocating to Los Angeles this summer). Being removed — both geographically and philosophically — from the region where he was raised gave Somerville the space to reflect on his heritage: the values passed down by his parents; the historical baggage that comes with being Southern; the guilt of being privileged simply because of skin color; and what, exactly, that all added up to.

“It was something I always thought about, but I didn’t know how to approach it,” he says. “It came out of the idea of identity: What is my identity? Who am I? As a white guy, what do I have to offer?”

The new environment also influenced Somerville’s artistic development. Traveling from his home to his studio every day, he became fascinated with the tattered billboards he’d see go unchanged for months in certain neighborhoods. He wanted to experiment with similar textures and, roughly, size. He began to collect boxes of found material — blueprints, sheet music, pages from textbooks, old magazines — to use as the base for his paintings. When he starts to put an image together, Somerville says he’s never quite sure what the end result is going to be: “It’s a learning process the whole way.”

His first piece to deal with issues of race and U.S. history was relatively simple: a portrait of Martin Luther King with a Nike swoosh hovering above his head. By taking an iconic figure and subverting what he stood for — trading King’s utopian idealism for crass commercialism — Somerville found a way to challenge popular perceptions, as well as illustrate the conflict between his beliefs and the intense prejudices that are practically soaked into the soil of where he grew up. It opened the door for increasingly extreme juxtapositions: Malcolm X wearing a Klan hood, Abraham Lincoln with a blackface caricature imprinted between his eyes. As his collages became more complex, they also became more open to misinterpretation: In the comment book from a showing at the University of Georgia, somebody accused him of racism — and applauded him for it.

Aside from George Bush, Peckerwood Nation is mostly free of recognizable archetypes. Recently, Somerville started to move away from using famous faces as focal points, replacing them with anonymous visages from the grainy, discolored photographs he discovered at flea markets and second-hand stores. In some cases, he’s kept the individuals frozen in their world and attached a mythology to them, superimposing either racist iconography (white robes, Confederate flags) or African-American stereotypes (do-rags, nappy hair) over their pictures. “He’s reclaiming their identity, and also claiming their internal racism,” Larramendy says. In others, Somerville removes the subjects completely from any specific time or place, sketching them on stark white paper and leaving the viewer to fill in the gaps. It’s those graphite drawings — quiet and unassuming compared to massive narrative pieces Somerville normally does — that Larramendy chose to center the exhibit around.

“When I see Travis’s work, I think it’s so important that somebody is working this way,” he says. “It sparks conversation; it creates debate. There’s many reasons why I love art, but, for me, when art is a vehicle for discussion — important discussion — it’s really serving a wonderful function in society.”

In an age where it takes a natural disaster of apocalyptic proportions to refresh the national discourse about race in the United States, Somerville hopes his art can keep the lines of communication open. But he’s not trying to pass any judgments or shove an opinion down anyone’s throat. More than anything, Somerville’s work is about himself.

“I’m not trying to save anybody or say, ‘This is right, this is wrong,’” he insists. “I’m pretty much reporting my feelings, my experiences and my beliefs. I’m not saying, ‘This is how it is.’ It’s open to interpretation.”

Travis Somerville’s Peckerwood Nation will hang at the Nathan Larramendy Gallery (107 South Signal St., Ojai) through March 26. For more information, visit www.larramendygallery.com or call 646-2750.

***
Prov.: Catherine Clark Gallery, San Francisco; 2005 SF Art Fair

"TREE MAN" (2004) (EDITION OF 2,500) (INJECTION MOLDED PLASTIC, 3 IN HIGH) by MARCEL DZAMA
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"UZAMA" (2004) (EDITION OF 2,500) (INJECTION MOLDED PLASTIC, 3 IN HIGH) by MARCEL DZAMA
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"CLOUDINUS" (2004) (EDITION OF 2,500) (INJECTION MOLDED PLASTIC, 3 IN HIGH) by MARCEL DZAMA
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"EVIL UGOLINOR" (2004) (EDITION OF 2,500) (INJECTION MOLDED PLASTIC, 3 IN HIGH) by MARCEL DZAMA
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"XENOPHANER" (2004) (EDITION OF 2,500) (INJECTION MOLDED PLASTIC, 3 IN HIGH) by MARCEL DZAMA
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"SEA SNAKE MAN" (2004) (EDITION OF 2,500) (INJECTION MOLDED PLASTIC, 3 IN HIGH) by MARCEL DZAMA
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"ALBATROSS NOTE" (RECORD) by Marcel Dzama (aka Dzama Radio)
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

[SEVENTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATES:


Marcel Dzama is exhibiting through April 8 with Alice Shaw at the San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery, 401 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco. Their exhibit got a write-up in the March 4 issue of the SF Chronicle. Here's an excerpt from Kenneth Baker's article entitled "A slide show that won't put you to sleep. No, really":

"...a sort of low-intensity mischief.

"Dzama's drawings look a little like cartoons. He frequently writes in captions such as '15 Famous People'--none of whom even looks fully human--and 'Cowbows Against Crime,' in which cowboys take aim at what look like Capone-era gansters.

"Dzama leaves most of his drawings untitled but those who handle his work attach parenthetical mnemonic phrases, such as 'cake walking down cat stairs': The drawing makes it sound perfectly sensible.

"Dzama uses root beer, with ink and watercolor, as a drawing medium, lending his sheets a unifying sepia tone and rhyming with the sweetness that many of them--but by no means all-- have.

"Weird things happen without fanfare in many of Dzama's images. They have the quality of illustrations for not-yet-written fairy tales, with all that implies of the fairy tale's power to conjure and resolve childish fears."

***
Prov.: Susan Inglett Gallery, New York; Trillium Press, San Francisco; 2005 International San Francisco Art Expo

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