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Wednesday, September 27, 2006

"[] (FOAM, CONTACT PAPER, SHADOW BOX-TYPE FRAME)" by STEPHANIE SYJUCO
Location: Babaylan Lodge

[ELEVENTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE.]

UPDATE:

Stephanie Syjuco is the subject of Art on Paper (Sept./Oct.)'s "How It Was Done Column". The article "It Takes A Village" by Reena Jana discusses how Syjuco makes photographs by downloading images from a Google search utilizing "Filipino" and "Philippines", cutting them out and placing them across backing of heavyweight paper, juxtaposing the cut-out images in various dioramas, then photographing them. She considers the lack of sharpness in the downloaded images to be a metaphor for the inaccurate representation she's found online of the Philippines.

***
Prov.: Syjuco: New Langton Arts, San Francisco; Barrios: New Langton Arts, San Francisco.

"Philip the Arabian, First Half of the III Century, A.D." (2006) (ACRYLIC ON WOOD BLOCK, 6.5 x 5.75 x .75) by MARK MULRONEY
Location: Galatea Offsite - San Francisco Apartment

"Untitled" (2005) (ACRYLIC ON WOOD BLOCK, 7.75 x 4.75 x 1.05) by MARK MULRONEY
Location: Galatea Offsite - San Francisco Apartment

We've been following Mark Mulroney's work over the past couple of years and were happy to finally get some of his works during Eileen's recent trip to New York. Mark apparently also will have an exhibition at Mixed Greens this coming November.

***
Prov.: Mixed Greens, New York

Sunday, September 24, 2006

"AGENTS" (1996) (INK, GRAPHITE AND GEL MEDIUM ON CLEAR MYLAR, 17 x 11 IN) by SHARON LOUDENLocation: Dining Room, Pygmalion-First Floor

"AGENTS" (1996) (INK, GRAPHITE AND GEL MEDIUM ON CLEAR MYLAR, 17 x 11 IN) by SHARON LOUDENLocation: Dining Room, Pygmalion-First Floor

[ELEVENTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:


Von Lintel Gallery of New York sends out this press release re Sharon Louden:

Sharon Louden at List Art Center

The David Winton Bell Gallery and Brown University’s Department of Visual Art present in TRANSIT: from OBJECT to SITE, from Saturday, Sept. 9, through Sunday, Oct. 22, 2006, at Brown University.

The collaborative exhibition features a series of installations displayed throughout List Art Center, transforming the modernist architecture of Philip Johnson’s 1971 building into a lively space of diverse multimedia and site-based projects.

Sharon Louden’s outdoor installation Faires is situated on the lawn facing the main entrance to the List Art Center. More than 200,000 feet of black tie-wire is arranged into an organic configuration that elegantly merges with its natural setting. Within theses piles of raw wire, thousands of small, flickering “lights” (reflective sheeting imbedded in the piles of wire) absorb and reflect the constantly changing light from its surrounding, creating a magical lighting field. Louden is a New York-based artist who works in numerous media, from drawing and painting to sculpture, installation and mostly recently video animation. Her work has been exhibited in numerous museums and galleries including the Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art in Ridgefield, Conn.; the Drawing Center in New York; Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh; Delaware Center for Contemporary Arts in Wilmington; Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art in Kansas City, Mo.; and most recently the Neuberger Museum of Art in Purchase, N.Y.

The David Winton Bell Gallery, located on the first floor of List Art Center, 64 College St., Providence, Rhode Island, is open from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday and 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. For more information, call 401/ 863-2932.

For additional information on Sharon Louden you can visit her website or www.oliverkamm.com.

***
Prov. Haines Gallery, San Francisco, CA

"[]" (OIL PAINTING, 21" X 15") (1842) by JACOB AKKERSDIJK
Location: TBD

Jacob Akkersdijk, Dutch, lived from 1815-1862. The painting apparently was put up at auction in each year since 2003 and did not sell. It seems no one loved the painting until we at Galatea saw it. Their loss; Our Gain.

***
Prov.: Christie's - Amsterdam

"UNTITLED" (2002) (GOUACHE ON WOOD PANEL) by CLARE ROJAS
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"UNTITLED" (2003) COMMISSIONED SITE-SPECIFIC MURAL INSTALLATION (GOUCHE/LATEX ON WALL) by CLARE ROJAS
Location: Master Bedroom Hallway, Pygmalion-2nd Floor

"ACHILLES" (2005) COMMISSIONED PAINTING by CLARE ROJAS
Location: Living Room, Pygmalion-First Floor

[THIRTEENTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:


Clare Rojas has opened a new exhibition:

Clare Rojas: Hope Springs Eternal
September 21 - December 17, 2006
Rose Art Museum
Brandeis University, Waltham, MA

***
Prov.: Lizabeth Oliveria Gallery, Culver City, CA

Thursday, September 21, 2006

DOUBLE CIRCLE (JANUARY, 1996) (OIL ON GRAPHITE ON CANVAS, 12 x 9 IN) by EVE ASCHHEIM
Location: Hallway Before Turret, Pygmalion-First Floor

REGULAR II (MARCH, 1997) (OIL ON GRAPHITE ON CANVAS, 9 X 12 IN) by EVE ASCHHEIM
Location: Hallway Before Turret, Pygmalion-First Floor

AUREOLE (JULY, 1997) (OIL ON GRAPHITE ON CANVAS, 12 IN DIAMETER) by EVE ASCHHEIM
Location: Hallway Before Turret, Pygmalion-First Floor

CONWAY (1995) (OIL, CHARCOAL, GRAPHITE ON CANVAS, 14 x 11 IN) by EVE ASCHHEIM
Location: Hallway Before Turret, Pygmalion-First Floor

[SEVENTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:


Eve Aschheim is the subject of a new article at Princeton University News! Here it is also in its entirety:

Aschheim teaches visual arts students to trust their instincts
by Jennifer Greenstein Altmann · Posted September 14, 2006; 10:46 a.m.

When Eve Aschheim enters a classroom at the beginning of the semester, she wants to get her students thinking about the relationship of ideas to paper. They may be accustomed to putting their thoughts on paper in the form of an essay or a poem. She wants them to express those thoughts not with words, but with the tip of a pencil or a paintbrush.

"My class is about the kinds of questions you can ask in a work of art, and being on the edge of your own intuition," said Aschheim, who is director of the Program in Visual Arts. "I want to open up some of the more conventional notions they might have about art."

The students who take her drawing and painting classes come from a variety of art backgrounds: some have never drawn or painted before, and some have a lot of experience. Aschheim gently prods all of them to take risks and explore, and she draws on diverse sources to provide them with inspiration and insight. Gently pushing boundaries is the same approach that Aschheim takes in her own work.

Aschheim's drawings, several of which are in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art, favor simple forms — lines, dashes, ellipses — and a limited color palette dominated by white, blue and black. Aschheim is known for the subtlety and nuance of her drawings and paintings, for the luminous images she creates and for pieces that appear delicate and muscular all at once.

Aschheim, who teaches painting and introduction to drawing, arrived at Princeton in 1991. She was appointed a senior lecturer in 2001 and became director of the Program in Visual Arts two years later.

She provides students with various subject matters — landscapes, still lifes, figures — and various approaches — working from a photograph, from life, from their imagination. Technique is secondary. The idea is to get them to loosen their inhibitions and make discoveries.

"She encourages you to explore and be open-minded as long as possible," said Elizabeth Looke-Stewart, a member of the class of 2006 and a winner of Princeton's Lucas Award in Visual Arts who works as a photo editor in New York. "She also encouraged me not to be afraid to take risks and to try different ways of working."

Aschheim is known for her accessibility to students, even the ones who are not taking her classes. "While Eve Aschheim was one of the most influential professors during my Princeton career, one of the most telling characteristics of the nature of the relationship that I share with her is that she was never my professor or adviser," said Temitayo Ogunbiyi, a member of the class of 2006 who also received a Lucas Award. "Eve always made time for me and my work — meeting with me whenever I desired feedback, inviting me to studio visits she'd arranged for her class, coming to my studio at 11 o'clock on a weeknight because she knew I'd be there. She wrote numerous recommendations and put me in touch with a number of incredible people."

Aschheim finds Princeton students have a "wonderful energy. Nearly every student produces something very personal and meaningful and surprising, something you didn't know was there, and that's really what I'm trying to do. That's where new art will come from. As a teacher you have to nurture it and step aside, not intervene too much. I give them the formal structure so they can access the language of drawing and see what they can do with it."

Students from the program have gone on to promising careers in a wide range of artistic fields. Dana Brintz '02 earned a master's degree in fine art from the Chelsea College of Art and Design in London last year and has had two exhibitions of her drawings at London galleries. Fazal Sheikh '87 won a MacArthur Fellowship last year for his portrait photography of displaced people. Jodi Hauptman '86 is associate curator in the department of drawings at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

Aschheim enjoys her role as director of the program because she loves interacting with artists who may be interested in coming to Princeton to teach.

"Finding new faculty is one of the most stimulating and rewarding parts of the job," she said. "It's an exciting time for the visual arts program. The administration has been extremely supportive, and is allowing us to reach our full potential."

The program is part of the new University Center for the Creative and Performing Arts, established by President Tilghman this year with a gift from alumnus Peter Lewis. Tilghman's initiative also includes plans to expand the size, resources and visibility of Princeton's undergraduate certificate programs in visual arts, creative writing, musical performance, and theater and dance. As part of that expansion, plans are under way to create a film studies certificate program, Aschheim said.

The Program in Visual Arts, in conjunction with the Council of the Humanities, recently has brought several well-known artists to Princeton as visiting faculty members and lecturers. Dawn Clements, who makes large panoramas that convey the feeling of living in a confined space, visited last spring as a guest printmaker and adjunct lecturer, and returns this fall to teach drawing. This year's fellows include Cuban-born photographer Abelardo Morell, Austrian filmmaker and theorist Peter Kubelka, and filmmaker and performance artist Yvonne Rainer.

A recent addition to the faculty is John O'Connor, a lecturer who does large-scale drawings that use idiosyncratic systems and graphs to register different patterns of human behavior. He will be teaching a new course called "Advanced Drawing" this fall.

"We added 'Advanced Drawing' partly in response to student demand and partly in response to the changing nature of the art world, where drawing right now is coming to the fore as a medium in its own right," Aschheim said. Drawing used to be regarded as a precursor to painting, rather than an art form itself.

Thinking in different ways

Aschheim's work, which embraces drawing as an art form, has been acquired by several prominent museums. In addition to the Museum of Modern Art, her pieces are in the collections of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., the Lannan Foundation in New Mexico, the Yale University Art Gallery and the Fogg Art Museum at Harvard University, among others. A defining moment of her career occurred when a well-known collector named Werner Kramarsky visited her studio in 1995, looked at six drawings and purchased all of them. He later donated two of Aschheim's drawings to the Museum of Modern Art. "If you live in New York — if you were born in New York, like me — all you think about is MoMA," she said.

This fall her work will be on display at the Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College in a show called "Twice Drawn." And in February 2007 she will have a show of her work on paper with one other artist, sculptor Jonathan Silver, at the Lori Bookstein Fine Art gallery in New York City.

Her work, which tends to be done on small canvases, uses abstract shapes to build complex relationships and structures. "I want to create a composition that is open, where the viewer can imagine," Aschheim said.

"The relation between her hand's irregular gestures and the blank ground upon which she chooses to make them creates an almost musical harmony, where sounds and pauses are of equal importance to the whole," wrote curator Regina Coppola in an essay accompanying an exhibition called "Eve Aschheim: Recent Work," shown in 2003 at the University Gallery at the Fine Arts Center at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. "Some works are dynamically dense with a torrent of dashes or layers of superimposed angles and lines, while others contain no more than a handful of delicate ellipses that balance each other with rhythmic undertones of stillness."

Aschheim works in a studio in Manhattan with a view of the Hudson River. Being in New York keeps her in touch with what's going on in the art world. When she's in Princeton, she relishes having "time and space to think," she said. She also cherishes contact with her colleagues at the University, both in the visual arts program and beyond it. A few years ago she paid a visit to John Conway, the John von Neumann Professor in Applied and Computational Mathematics.

"I told him I wanted to learn about mathematics," she said. "I was hoping I could learn to think in different ways about space and geometry."

Conway was eager to share his knowledge, and later came to one of Aschheim's classes to talk to her students about hyperbolic space and geometry, making sketches for the students.

Aschheim has pushed the boundaries of her work in recent years by experimenting with a new medium, thanks to a collaboration with professor of visual arts Emmet Gowin, a photographer.

"He saw my drawings and suggested we try to make photograms," Aschheim said. Working in a photography studio at 185 Nassau St., the two took several of Aschheim's drawings on mylar, laid them on photo paper, exposed them to the light and developed the photos. Marks that Aschheim had erased from her drawings during the creative process were now visible. For Aschheim, the photograms were a way to see where she's been and where she's going — and to examine how she got there.

"You can see how the drawing was made," Aschheim said. "All this hidden information comes out."

In the classroom, Aschheim helps students explore new ground and examine their own work in fresh ways. She has an "eye for untrodden paths," Ogunbiyi said.

"She pushed us to expand our art perspective, and encouraged us to explore a range of drawing mediums and discover new ways of expressing our work," said Veneka Chagwedera, who will be a sophomore this year.

For Aschheim, what she seeks to achieve in her own artwork is closely related to what she strives for in the classroom.

"What I try to do in my work is bring everything down to the basics and then build it back up again," she said. "And that's what I try to do in my teaching, too."

***
Prov: Stefan Stux Gallery, New York

"MT-M13" (2005) (WATERCOLOR, INK AND GRAPHITE ON PAPER, 15 x 18 IN UNFRAMED) by EMILIE CLARK
Location: Library Bathroom, Pygmalion-First Floor

[FIFTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:


Emilie Clark is currently in the following group exhibition:

TRANSFORMATIVE

with Franklin Evans, Ruth Pastine and Rachel Urkowitz

through October 13, 2006

at

Nathan Larramendy Gallery
107 South Signal STreet
Ojai, CA 93023

***
Prov.: Nathan Larramendy Gallery, Ojai, CA

"THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS, I, II AND III (2002)," THREE PHOTOGRAPHIC PRINTS by MAIL ORDER BRIDES
Location: Turret Guest Bathroom, Pygmalion-First Floor

SEVENTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:


Jennifer Wofford is part of the Mail Order Brides is a performance art group, whose other members are Reanne Estrada, Eliza Barrios and Jenifer Wofford). Wofford has several new developments:

First, a website at http://www.wofflehouse.com/

And: She is in the "Immediate Future" Murphy Cadogan Award Show at the San Francisco Arts Commission gallery. The show runs from Sept 14-Oct 28. Info at http://www.sfacgallery.org/exhibitions_detail.fsp?id=263295

And: She is currently showing a group of the "Nurse Drawings" for Kearny Street orkshop's APAture Festival. The show is from Sept 19-30. Info at http://kearnystreet.org/programs/ksw-ext/apature2006/index.html

Last but not least:

ART EXHIBIT
"Manila Envelope"


September 26, 2006 - October 13, 2006
Worth Ryder Art Gallery/116 Kroeber

MANILA ENVELOPE, a presentation of work from Manila artists Poklong Anading, Poi Beltran, MM Yu, Jayson Oliveria, Yason Banal, Lena Cobangbang, Louie Cordero, Gerardo Tan, Denis Lagdameo, Carlos Celdranand Norberto Roldan with contextual photos and writing by MFA candidate in Art Practice Jenifer K. Wofford.

MFA candidate Jenifer K Wofford received a Pacific Rim Research Program grant to document contemporary visual culture in Metro Manila this past summer. MANILA ENVELOPE is the resultant snapshot of new experimental art coming out of the alternative artist-run spaces in the Philippines capital city, June 2006. This exhibition showcases work made by local visual artists, and also provides some background and context about Metro Manila's current arts communities.

Sponsored by Art Practice, Contact Phone: 642-2582, Contact Email: artdept@berkeley.edu

The Center for Southeast Asia Studies
International & Area Studies
University of California at Berkeley
2223 Fulton Street, #617
Berkeley, CA 94720-2318
Phone: (510) 642-3609
Fax: (510) 643-7062
http://ias.berkeley.edu/cseas/

***
Prov.: Lizabeth Oliveria Gallery, Culver City, CA

Friday, September 08, 2006

"ACHILLES AND GABRIELA" (OIL PAINTING) by JON ENGDAHL
Location: Galatea Offsite-SF Apartment

As this year's birthday present, the hubby gave me a commissioned painting of our beloved dogs. Jon Engdahl painted a stylized version of Achilles and Gabriela based on this photo:



Happy Birthday to Moi!

***
Prov.: Direct from Artist

Thursday, September 07, 2006

"[]" (BOWL WITH TWO HANDLES, GOLDEN SURFACE) by BEATRICE WOOD
Location: Library, Pygmalion-First Floor

"FRIGHTENED OF HER DREAMS" (COLORED PENCIL ON PAPER) (1995) by BEATRICE WOOD
Location: Galatea Offsite-SF Apartment

"MADAM LOLA'S PLEASURE PALACE" by COUNTESS LOLA SCREWVINSKY (ALIAS BEATRICE WOOD) (No. 39 of 500 SIGNED LIMITED FACSIMILE EDITION OF THE ORIGINAL SPIRAL BOUND BOOK) (1994) by BEATRICE WOOD
Location: Library, Pygmalion-Second Floor

[THIRD MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:


Garth Clark Gallery in New York City celebrates its 25th anniversary with an exhibition-homage to the subject of its inaugural exhibit: Beatrice Wood! Here are details, beginning with champagne!

A champagne reception, 5-7 p.m., September 12
kicks off the exhibit
BEATRICE WOOD: A VERY PRIVATE VIEW
through November 12, 2006

***
Prov.: Bowl (LP); Drawing and Book (Beatrice Wood Foundation, Ojai, CA).

Wednesday, September 06, 2006

"PATCHWORK: X-27 EXPLORER" (ROBOT SERIES) (2005) (VINTAGE PAPER, STITCHING HOLES. GRAPHITE, WATERCOLOR, INK) (4 X 4, FRAMED) by LISA SOLOMON
Location: Library, Pygmalion-First Floor

[SIXTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:


Looks like Lisa Solomon will have a busy Fall! Here are her upcoming shows:


:: Opening Sept 5 and up through November 11 ::

^^^ GEOGRAPHIC PREMINITIONS ^^^
RECEPTION :: SATURDAY OCTOBER 14, 4-8PM


With Tara Daly, Barbara Diener, Desiree Holman, Kathleen Li, Tim Metallo, Michael Meyers, Kelsey Nicholson, Alexandria Pembleton, Andrew Phares, Kirstyn Russell, Amy Sollins, Mark Taylor, Sara Thacher, Jake Watlin

The Richmond Art Center {{ http://www.therac.org }}
2540 Barrett Avenue | Richmond, CA | 94804 | 510.620.6772
Tuesday - Saturday, 12 - 5 pm


:: September 9 through October 14 ::

*** NOSTALGIA ***
RECEPTION :: SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 9, 5-8PM


With Andrew Phares, Lauren Gibbes, Lisa Kokin

AfterModern {{ http://www.aftermodern.com }}
445 Bryant Street |San Francisco, CA 94107 | 415.512.7678


:: Opening September 24 and up through November 5, 2006 ::

!!! EMBROIDERED STORIES / KNITTED TALES !!!
RECEPTION :: Sunday September 24, 3-5 :: free admission


Bedford Gallery {{ http://www.bedfordgallery.org }}
1601 Civic Drive | Walnut Creek, CA | 94596 | 925.295.1486
Tuesday through Sunday, 12:00 - 5:00 p.m
General admission is $3.00 for adults, $2.00 for youth ages 13-17, free for children 12 and under. Free admission every Tuesday 12:00 - 5:00 p.m.


:: From now until October 1st I’m in ::

---BEDTIME STORIES--- In this show are some older figurative embroidery pieces.....

With J.D. Beltran, Lynn Criswell, Davis & Davis, Dane Howard, Evri Kwong, Michael McConnell, Brian McDonald, & Marta Thoma
"Bedtime Stories” is a group show investigating the different aspects of childhood, from fairytale and dream to youth and maturity

LIMN Gallery {{ http://www.limn.com }}
292 Townsend Street | San Francisco, CA | 415.977.1300 |
Gallery hours are: Wed. - Sun. from 11:00 am to 5:30 pm


:: November 13 – December 7 ::

%%% THE POINT OF LOOSE ENDS %%%
RECEPTION :: Monday, November 13, 11am - 2pm

Two person show with myself and Wendy Kawabata

KRUGLAK GALLERY | Mira Costa College
One Barnard Drive | Oceanside, CA 92056 | 760.757.2121
The gallery is located in the lower level of the student center. Use lot 3B for gallery parking – obtain a visitor’s parking permit from the Campus Police building in lot 1A. Gallery number – 760 795-6657.

***
Prov.: Graystone, San Francisco; 2005 San Francisco International Art Expo

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