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Sunday, April 29, 2007

FOUR "DECAYING ORANGE" PHOTOGRAPHS (2004) by MEL VERA CRUZ
Location: Babaylan Lodge

FOUR "EROTIC LEMON" PHOTOGRAPHS (2004) by MEL VERA CRUZ
Location: Babaylan Lodge

"[] SILK-SCREENED COLLAGE ON CARDBOARD (WHITE)" (2004) by MEL VERA CRUZ
Location: Galatea Offsite - SF Apartment

"[] SILK-SCREENED COLLAGE ON CARDBOARD (BLUE)" (2004) by MEL VERA CRUZ
Location: Galatea Offsite - SF Apartment

EIGHTH MENTION

Mel Vera Cruz is in a new group exhibition; here's the gallery's press release:

ESTEBAN SABAR GALLERY PRESENTS

TRAIDOR!

Paintings by England Hidalgo , Marcius Noceda, Carlo Ricafort, Mel Vera Cruz

Curated by: Lian Ladia

May 3-31, 2007
Reception: May 3, 6-9 pm

SAN FRANCISCO – April 17, 2007 – Esteban Sabar Gallery is pleased to present TRAIDOR! An exhibition by four contemporary Filipino Painters England Hidalgo, Marcius Noceda, Carlo Ricafort and Mel Vera Cruz. Lian Ladia, the curator, explains, “Traidor is a spanish word for traitor, and this exhibition explores the seduction of material objects, annihilation of a sabotaged history and the breath of survival."

Socio-Realism, rejection for power, anarchy, pain and nihilism are some of the issues that are spread on canvas, showing textures of decay and beauty. Marcius Noceda’s paintings particularly delves on the mutation of the “Makapili”, traitors and conspirators who wore masks during the Japanese Occupation in World War II.

The painters are all Filipino and working primarily in the Bay Area with a focus on Postmodern, satiric and political artworks. Their most recent show was at Somarts in San Francisco called Overmapped with significant artists like Carlos Villa and Robert
Guitterez. The group’s dynamics is very progressive and they have been invited to exhibit their works at the Cultural Center of the Philippines , Manila in 2008.

Esteban Sabar Gallery Hours:
Monday, Thursday & Friday:
11am to 6pm

Saturday & Sunday:
12noon to 6pm

Esteban Sabar Gallery
480 23rd St.
Oakland, CA 94612

Additional Event Information
415.728.4106

http://kwatro-kantos.com

***
Provenance: Direct from Artist

Friday, April 27, 2007

"UNTITLED" (2002) (GOUACHE ON WOOD PANEL) by CLARE ROJAS
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"UNTITLED" (2003) COMMISSIONED SITE-SPECIFIC MURAL INSTALLATION (GOUCHE/LATEX ON WALL) by CLARE ROJAS
Location: Master Bedroom Hallway, Pygmalion-2nd Floor

"ACHILLES" (2005) COMMISSIONED PAINTING by CLARE ROJAS
Location: Living Room, Pygmalion-First Floor

SIXTEENTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:


Clare Rojas's ongoing exhibition at Lizabeth Oliveria Gallery (see prior post) was just reviewed by the Los Angeles Times Los Angeles Times Calendarlivecom. You can see HERE, or read below (N.B. I actually don't like this review -- I personally don't think there's a "direct line" from Barry McGee's to Clare Rojas' work (even though -- just because?) they're married -- but, shrug, at least it's a favorable review):

AROUND THE GALLERIES
L.A. galleries: Clare Rojas joins the frat party
Rojas' current work at Lizabeth Oliveria has a great deal of fun with the male image.

Folksy
(Clare Rojas / Lizabeth Oliveria Gallery)

By Holly Myers, Special to The Times

Consider the frat party: young men sucking beer out of long plastic tubes while standing on their hands on the lip of a keg; pounding tequila shots and swaying, bleary-eyed, while others pound on sticky tables and chant; dancing with construction cones on their heads and slices of pizza held bikini-like over bared nipples — not, to be sure, the most becoming facet of young American manhood.

Enter Peggy Honeywell, the folk singer alter ego of San Francisco artist Clare Rojas. With a sweet, Midwestern face, thick, black curls piled high on her head and eyes that could melt an iceberg, she settles on a sofa in the center of the melee and, without so much as a flicker of irony, launches into an achingly tender ballad called "Bower Bird." (The title refers to an Australian species whose males are known for their remarkably complex mating behaviors, which include building elaborate "bachelor pad" bowers to lure the females.)

The young men pause respectfully — one, perhaps love-struck, begins to harmonize — then happily resume their head banging, now absurdly out of rhythm.

The scene appears in a three-minute video in Rojas' current solo show at Lizabeth Oliveria (a collaboration between Rojas, Ted Passon and Andrew Jeffrey Wright) and epitomizes the show's endearing spirit: an appealing fusion of earnestness, playfulness, technical skill (her painting, like her voice, is delectable) and deceptive conceptual acumen.

In this, as in past work, Rojas has a great deal of fun with the male image. In the largest painting (all are untitled), a nude male figure floats horizontally in the air, guzzling a bottle of beer, his pointed penis arcing skyward, while women poke him with pencils and laugh. (Two more penises, free-floating and anthropomorphized, appear to be engaged in a boxing match nearby.) In other, smaller paintings, nude men adopt silly, contortionist poses, as if emulating female fashion models. The women, by contrast, are invariably clothed — they wear long, formless, patterned smocks — and always seem confidently in charge.

Rojas' folk-y imagery and floor-to-ceiling installation style betray a direct line to the work of fellow San Franciscan Barry McGee and McGee's late wife, Margaret Kilgallen. The most obvious distinction is Rojas' rigorous investment in Americana decoration, particularly quilting. Much of the installation is taken up with bright, blocky pattern — triangles, squares, stripes, flowers and stars, anarchic in its sprawl but taut in design and fabrication.

As with much of the best McGee-school, street-conscious work of the last decade, the show is distinguished by its visual generosity.

Stepping into the virtually wallpapered main space of the gallery is an enlivening, heartening, cheering experience. Given the scale of Rojas' output in recent years — three albums as Peggy Honeywell and a whopping 13 solo shows, three of them at museums, since she received her master of fine arts degree from the Art Institute of Chicago in 2002 — it's clearly the result of fierce effort. Like any good hostess, however, she is loath to let you think so.

Lizabeth Oliveria Gallery, 2712 S. La Cienega Blvd., Los Angeles, (310) 837-1073, through June 2. Closed Sundays and Mondays. www.lizabetholiveria.com..

***
MO: Prov.: Lizabeth Oliveria Gallery, Culver City, CA

Thursday, April 12, 2007

"UNTITLED" (2002) (GOUACHE ON WOOD PANEL) by CLARE ROJAS
Location: Galatea Offsite/San Francisco Apartment

"UNTITLED" (2003) COMMISSIONED SITE-SPECIFIC MURAL INSTALLATION (GOUCHE/LATEX ON WALL) by CLARE ROJAS
Location: Master Bedroom Hallway, Pygmalion-2nd Floor

"ACHILLES" (2005) COMMISSIONED PAINTING by CLARE ROJAS
Location: Living Room, Pygmalion-First Floor

FIFTEENTH MENTION DUE TO UPDATE]

UPDATE:


Clare Rojas is in a new exhibition at Lizabeth Oliveria Gallery. Here's the gallery's press release:

Exhibition: Kitty Buck - paintings & installation by Clare E. Rojas
Date: April 14th - June 2nd, 2007
Opening Reception: April 14th 6-8pm with performance by Peggy Honeywell
Where: 2712 S. La Cienega Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90034
contact: +1. 310.837.1073

Lizabeth Oliveria Gallery is delighted to present Kitty Buck a solo exhibition by Clare E. Rojas. This marks Rojas' first solo exhibition at Lizabeth Oliveria Gallery, Los Angeles. The show will open April 14th and will run until June 2nd, 2007. There will be a reception for the artist, Saturday, April 14th from 6-8 p.m. with a musical performance by Peggy Honeywell.

On the heels of her solo exhibition, Hope Springs Eternal, at the Rose Art Museum, Waltham, MA, Rojas brings a scaled down installation to Los Angeles for Kitty Buck. Her quilt patchwork installations combines her complex iconography with traditional American folk art imagery inspired by and in homage to the feminist traditions of the 1970’s, such as the work of Miriam Schapiro and Judy Chicago. As Raphaela Platow so eloquently describes in her catalog essay, Hope Springs Eternal, Clare Rojas’ women “… are portrayed not in the supposed roles as caring spouses, mothers, and housekeepers, but as individuals often engaged in enigmatic activities. Women of all ages populate the artist’s work. Their long robes function like protective armor, belying their bodies’ silhouettes. They could be priestesses or warriors. With confidence and radiance, they interact with each other, men, children, animals and nature to project an interconnectedness with their surroundings.” *

Clare E. Rojas (born in Ohio, USA, 1976) received her M.F.A from the School of the Art Institute, Chicago, IL. Her work has been exhibited extensively both nationally and internationally, including solo exhibitions at The Rose Art Museum, Waltham, MA (catalog); Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Castilla y León (MUSAC), Spain; Stuart Shave/Modern Art, London, United Kindgom; Galleri Nicolai Wallner, Copenhagen, Denmark; and Deitch Projects, New York, NY. She has been invited to participate in group exhibitions, such as Panic Room, Deste Foundation, Athens, Greece; The Prague Biennial 2005, Prague, Czechoslovakia; Outerspace Hillbilly, Luggage Store, San Francisco, CA; and Beautiful Losers: Contemporary Art, Skateboarding and Street Culture, the Contemporary Art Center, Cincinnati, OH, a travelling exhibition from 2004-2007. A recipient of the 2003 Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Grant, Rojas will have an upcoming solo exhibition at Museum Heit Domein in Sittard, Holland.


***
MO: Prov.: Lizabeth Oliveria Gallery, Culver City, CA

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